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MMWR
Synopsis for July 16, 2004

The MMWR is embargoed until Thursday, 12 PM EDT.

  1. Genetic Testing for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility: Evaluating Direct-to-Consumer Marketing ― Atlanta, Denver, Raleigh-Durham, and Seattle, 2003
  2. Trichinellosis Associated with Bear Meat ― New York and Tennessee, 2003
  3. Prevalence of Anemia Among Displaced and Nondisplaced Mothers and Children ― Azerbaijan, 2001
  4. West Nile Virus Activity ― United States, July 7-13, 2004
There is no MMWR Telebriefing scheduled for Thursday, July 15, 2004

Synopsis for July 16, 2004

Genetic Testing for Breast and Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility: Evaluating Direct-to-Consumer Marketing ― Atlanta, Denver, Raleigh-Durham, and Seattle, 2003

Results from the first direct-to-consumer campaign to market BRCA1/2 testing to the public indicate that further research and additional education are needed to prepare consumers and health care providers to address the complexities of genetics testing.

PRESS CONTACT:
Melanie Myers, PhD, MS

CDC, Office of Genomics and Disease Prevention
(404) 498-1420
 

Consumer and provider awareness of clinical genetic testing for susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer (BRCA1/2 testing) increased in two cities where a direct-to-consumer marketing campaign for this genetic test was conducted in 2002-2003. Health care providers reported that the campaign had an impact on their practices, including more questions asked about testing, more tests requested, and more tests ordered. However, the survey also showed that providers often lacked knowledge to advise patients about inherited breast and ovarian cancer (BOC) susceptibility and testing. The sole U.S. provider of clinical genetic testing (Myriad Genetic Laboratories) for inherited BOC susceptibility conducted the marketing campaign in Atlanta, Georgia, and Denver, Colorado, during September 2002–February 2003. CDC and state health departments in the two pilot cities and two comparison cities (Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, and Seattle, Washington) surveyed consumers and health care providers to assess the impact of the campaign on consumer behaviors and provider practices. Based on the results of the survey, the authors indicate that more education and additional data on the benefits and limitations of genetic testing are needed to prepare consumers and health care providers as genetics becomes a part of routine health care.


Trichinellosis Associated with Bear Meat ― New York and Tennessee, 2003

Wild game meat is becoming progressively more popular and those who prefer to consume not fully cooked meat are at increased risk of infection with trichinella. Consumers should be advised to monitor for an adequate cooking temperature of 160Ί F (71Ί C).

PRESS CONTACT:
Robert Kenny
Acting Assistant Director of Public Affairs
New York State Department of Health
Public Affairs Office
(518) 474-7354
OR
Diane Denton
State of Tennessee Department of Health
(615) 741-3111
 

As a result of improvements in swine production, trichinellosis has declined steadily in the United States. However, infection also can result from eating meat of wild animals. During 1997–2001, a total of 72 cases of trichinellosis (median: 12 cases annually; range: 11–23 cases) were reported to CDC. The majority of these infections came from eating wild game, predominately bear. This report describes three cases of trichinellosis associated with eating undercooked bear meat reported from New York and Tennessee in 2003. Persons should cook all meats, particularly wild game, to an internal temperature 160Ί F (71Ί C).


Prevalence of Anemia Among Displaced and Nondisplaced Mothers and Children ― Azerbaijan, 2001

Levels of anemia among displaced and nondisplaced mothers and children in Azerbaijan approaches 40%, the level at which WHO recommends immediate public health action. Such actions include the implementation of iron supplementation and behavior modification programs. Future research should focus on identifying causes for the high rates of anemia in Azerbaijan.

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications

CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
(770) 488-5131
 

Azerbaijan currently hosts the largest number of conflict affected persons in Europe, many of whom are still coping with unfavorable living conditions despite sustained humanitarian assistance. This report provides the most recent estimates of anemia among displaced and nondisplaced mothers and children in Azerbaijan. Anemia has been associated with increased mortality and morbidity among women and children. This public health condition can be managed through inexpensive and effective interventions. Findings indicate a high prevalence of anemia among mothers and children, with no significant difference between the displaced and nondisplaced groups. In addition, anemia was associated with several socioeconomic factors such as education, socioeconomic status, area of residence and receiving humanitarian aid. A rapid response is needed to address anemia among high-risk groups while building the national capacity to reduce anemia.


West Nile Virus Activity ― United States, July 7-13, 2004

PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations

CDC, Office of Communications
(404) 639-3286
 

No summary available.






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