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MMWR
Synopsis for October 24, 2003

The MMWR is embargoed until NOON ET, Thursdays.

  1. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in U.S. Military Personnel Southwest/Central Asia, 20022003
  2. Infant Health Among Puerto Ricans Puerto Rico and U.S. Mainland, 19892000
  3. West Nile Virus Infection Among Turkey Breeder Farm Workers Wisconsin, 2002
  4. Nonfatal Injuries Among Older Adults Treated in Hospital Emergency Departments United States, 2001
  5. West Nile Virus Activity United States, October 1622, 2003
  6. Guidelines for Maintaining and Managing the Vaccine Cold Chain
No MMWR Telebriefing is scheduled for Thursday, October 23, 2003

Synopsis for October 24, 2003

Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in U.S. Military Personnel Southwest/Central Asia, 20022003

Cutaneous leishmaniasis should be considered in the diagnosis of U.S. military personnel, returning from central/southwest Asia, who have persistent skin lesions.

PRESS CONTACT:
Public Affairs Officer

Walter Reed Army Medical Center
(202) 7827177
 

Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease transmitted by sand flies. Persons who travel to, or live in, areas of the tropics, subtropics, and southern Europe are at-risk for developing the disease. This report provides preliminary data about 22 confirmed cases of cutaneous Leishmania major infection in U.S. military personnel deployed during 2002-2003 to Afghanistan, Iraq, or Kuwait. The cases were evaluated and treated at Walter Reed Army Medical Center from August 2002-September 2003.

 

Infant Health Among Puerto Ricans
Puerto Rico and U.S. Mainland, 19892000

Infants born in Puerto Rico are at a greater risk for low birthweight, pre-term delivery, and infant death than mainland-born Puerto Rican infants. The reasons for these disparities are unknown.

PRESS CONTACT:
Maura Whiteman, PhD

CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion
(770) 4886293
 

Among U.S. Hispanics, considerable heterogeneity exists in infant health, with the poorest outcomes reported among infants of Puerto Rican descent. This report compares trends during the previous decade in infant mortality, low birthweight (LBW), preterm delivery (PTD), and select maternal characteristics among infants born to Puerto Rican women in the U.S. mainland (50 states and the District of Columbia) with corresponding trends among infants born in Puerto Rico. The findings indicate that despite having lower prevalence of selected maternal risk factors, Puerto Rico-born infants are at greater risk for LBW, PTD, and infant death than U.S. mainland-born Puerto Rican infants. Future research should focus on identifying factors responsible for these disparities to guide prevention efforts to improve infant health in Puerto Rico.

 

West Nile Virus Infection Among Turkey Breeder
Farm Workers Wisconsin, 2002

This outbreak represents a new potential occupational exposure to West Nile virus (WNV), and turkey farm workers should take precautions to protect themselves from possible infection.

PRESS CONTACT:
Linda Glaser, DVM and Jeffrey Davis, MD

Wisconsin Department of Health
(608) 2679003
 

This report describes a cluster of WNV illnesses among turkey farm workers in Wisconsin during the fall of 2002. WNV infections were also documented in female turkeys at this farm. Because the mode of transmission to workers is unknown, it is recommended that turkey farm workers take appropriate precautions to prevent WNV infections. Workers should use mosquito repellant, wear protective clothing and gloves, and wash their hands frequently.

 

Nonfatal Injuries Among Older Adults Treated in Hospital Emergency Departments United States, 2001

Nonfatal injuries are a significant public health problem among older adults. Falls among older Americans contribute to a majority of these injuries.

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications

CDC, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
(770) 4884902
 

Injuries affect everyone, but little is known about their impact upon older adults even though injuries are the eighth leading cause of death for those 65 years and older. This study found that approximately 2.7 million older adults were treated for nonfatal injuries in U.S. hospital emergency departments in 2001. Falls were the leading cause of injuries (62%) and more women experienced falls (67%) than men (52%). CDC scientists recommend that prevention efforts be tailored for both men and women as they age. For example, exercise programs, which can reduce falls among older adults by 15%, are particularly important for older women who have much higher rates of fall-related injuries.

 

West Nile Virus Activity United States, October 1622, 2003

PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations

CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 6393286
 

No summary available.

 

 

 

 

Guidelines for Maintaining and Managing the
Vaccine Cold Chain

Storing vaccines at the correct temperature is critical to ensure that each dose of vaccine provides the maximum protection against disease.

PRESS CONTACT:
Greg Wallace, MD, MS, MPH

CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 6398257
(Alternate: Mary Mulholland, MA, 4046398222)
 

Immunization prevents millions of cases of infectious disease every year. Proper storage and handling of vaccines is critical to successful immunization. Letting vaccines get too warm or too cold can reduce their effectiveness. The guidelines published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) alert vaccine providers to the importance of good vaccine storage practices and outline the temperature requirements for vaccine storage and shipment, proper use of refrigerators and freezers for vaccine storage, and appropriate temperature monitoring practices.

 


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This page last reviewed October 23, 2003
URL: http://www.cdc.gov/media/mmwrnews/n031024.htm

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