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MMWR
Synopsis for October 10, 2003

The MMWR is embargoed until NOON ET, Thursdays.

  1. Cigarette Smoking Among Adults United States, 2001
  2. Yersinia enterocolitica Gastroenteritis Among Infants Exposed to Chitterlings Chicago, Illinois, 2002
  3. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination Levels Among Persons Aged > 65 Years United States, 19892001
  4. Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis Georgia, 2002
  5. West Nile Virus Activity United States, October 28, 2003
No MMWR Telebriefing is scheduled for Thursday, October 9, 2003

Synopsis for October 10, 2003

Cigarette Smoking Among Adults United States, 2001

Comprehensive tobacco control programs at the state level have helped to reduce tobacco use.

PRESS CONTACT:
Corinne Husten, MD

CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion
(770) 4885493
 

One of the national health objectives for 2010 is to reduce the prevalence of cigarette smoking among adults to <12% (objective 27.1a). To assess progress toward this objective, CDC analyzed self-reported data from the 2001 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Adult Core questionnaire. This report summarizes the findings of this analysis, which indicate that, in 2001, approximately 22.8% of U.S. adults were current smokers compared with 25.0% in 1993. Current smoking prevalence data from 1965 to 2001 indicate a slow but steady decrease among blacks and whites. This prevalence has declined more rapidly among black men than white men and among black women than white women, especially during the 1990s. However, the overall decline in smoking is not occurring at a rate that will meet the national prevalence objective of <12% by 2010.

 

Yersinia enterocolitica Gastroenteritis Among Infants Exposed to Chitterlings Chicago, Illinois, 2002

Infants are at risk of illness when exposed to chitterlings preparation.

PRESS CONTACT:
Tim Hadac

Chicago Department of Public Health
(312) 7479805
 

Consumers of chitterlings should be aware of the risks of chitterlings preparation and should take the necessary steps to avoid illness. Infants are especially susceptible to infection from bacteria commonly found in chitterlings, and are at risk simply from being around the person preparing the chitterlings, or from being present in the area where the chitterlings are prepared. Boiling chitterlings for five minutes prior to cleaning has been shown to be the safest method of preparation. Consumers should consider all chitterlings to be contaminated with harmful bacteria, and should carefully avoid contact with infants during chitterlings preparation.

 

Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination Levels Among Persons Aged > 65 Years United States, 19892001

Elderly Blacks and Hispanics are less likely to receive influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations than are whites.

PRESS CONTACT:
Walter Orenstein, MD

CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 6398200
(Alternate: Pascale Wortley, MD, MPH, 4046398823)
 

Both influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are recommended for persons 65 and older. Older Blacks and Hispanics are, however, substantially less likely than whites to have received the influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations. We analyzed 2000-2001 national survey data to describe these differences. Influenza and pneumococcal coverage levels were 66.0% and 57.3% for whites, 48.3% and 32.8% for blacks, and 53.7% and 31.7% for Hispanics. Marked differences in vaccination coverage persist even among persons most likely to be vaccinated, such as persons with the highest education level, or frequent visits to health-care providers. We also examined trends over time and found that these differences have persisted over time and the gap has not narrowed.

 

Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis Georgia, 2002

Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM) is an extremely rare, but fatal infection that may be prevented by holding the nose shut or using nose clips when jumping or diving into warm fresh water.

PRESS CONTACT:
LeAnne Fox, MD, MPH

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(770) 4887781
(Alternate: James Maguire, MD, MPH, (770) 4887766)
 

PAM is caused by Naegleria fowleri, an ameba that inhabits freshwater lakes, rivers and hot springs. PAM results when ameba-contaminated water incidentally enters the nose during aquatic activities and amebas migrate to the brain. Symptoms can include headache, fever, stiff neck and seizures. Although hundreds of millions of people swim in freshwater rivers and lakes, only 24 fatal cases of PAM have been documented in the United States from 1989-2000; the majority of which occurred in the summer and among children. High water temperature and lowered water level may lead to increased risk of infection. Recommendations for prevention include holding the nose shut or using nose clips when jumping or diving into bodies of fresh water.

 

West Nile Virus Activity United States, October 28, 2003

PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations

Office of Communication
(404) 6393286
 

No summary available.

 

 

 

 


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URL: http://www.cdc.gov/media/mmwrnews/n031010.htm

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