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Div. of Media Relations
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(404) 639-3286
Fax (404) 639-7394

 


MMWR
Synopsis for August 8, 2003

The MMWR is embargoed until NOON ET, Thursdays.

  1. Imported Plague New York City, 2003
  2. National, State, and Urban Area Vaccination Levels Among Children Aged 1935 Months 2002
  3. Vaccination Services in Postwar Iraq, May 2003
  4. Update: Adverse Event Data and Revised American Thoracic Society/CDC Recommendations Against the Use of Rifampin and Pyrazinamide for Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection United States, 2003
  5. Pneumococcal Vaccination for Cochlear Implant Candidates and Recipients: Updated Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices
  6. West Nile Virus Activity United States, July 31 August 6, 2003
MMWR Telebriefing for August 7, 2003
WHO: Dr. Julie Gerberding, Director, CDC
WHAT: News conference to discuss West Nile Virus in the United States.
WHEN: Thursday, August 7, 2003
2:00 PM ET

Brief remarks followed by Q/A.
WHERE: CDC
1600 Clifton Rd, Atlanta
Building 16, enter via Clifton Way parking deck

Parking is available in the Building 16 parking deck located on Clifton Way. Media must arrive at Building 16 entrance by 1:30 pm for access to the briefing. Media must present photo ID for access.

Media who cannot attend in-person, may listen and ask questions by toll-free conference line. The briefing will begin promptly and it is recommended that media dial-in a few minutes prior to the start of the conference.

Teleconference name: CDC
Dial: 866-254-5942

This briefing will also be audio webcast. Listen LIVE online at www.cdc.gov/media.

A full transcript of this teleconference will be available following the teleconference on the CDC website at www.cdc.gov/media.

Synopsis for August 8, 2003

Imported Plague New York City, 2003

Bubonic plague can be treated successfully if treatment begins early in the disease course.

PRESS CONTACT:
Chad Smelser, MD

CDC, Epidemiology Program Office
(505) 8270099
(Assigned New Mexico Department of Health)
 

Plague is a rodent-associated bacterial illness. The disease occurs naturally in seventeen western states. The disease is maintained in the environment through transmission between certain rodents and their fleas. Other mammals can become infected and some, including humans, suffer severe disease and high mortality. Human cases are usually acquired through the bites of infectious fleas; however, direct contact with the tissues or body fluids of infected animals and, rarely, inhalation of infectious materials can transmit the disease. Since the plague bacteria can cause severe human illness and is a potential agent of bioterrorism any patient suspected of having plague should be evaluated promptly for treatment and to determine the source of infection.

 

National, State, and Urban Area Vaccination Levels Among Children Aged 1935 Months 2002

Immunization coverage for 19-35 month old children in the United States remains at near-record highs.

PRESS CONTACT:
Natalie Darling, MS

CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 6398427
 

Coverage for varicella vaccine achieved a record high of 80.6%. Coverage with pneumococcal vaccine, reported for the first time, reached 40.9%. Although coverage with recommended vaccines remains high, vigilance is needed to maintain these high levels. Eliminating disparities between states and urban areas with the highest and lowest coverage remains a public health priority.

 

Vaccination Services in Postwar Iraq, May 2003

The restoration of important public health programs in Iraq, such as routine childhood immunizations, is underway and significant achievements have been made.

PRESS CONTACT:
Karen Triggs

Department of Defense
Note: Spokesperson is in Iraq. Phone contact is unreliable and there is an 8-hour time difference. Email: triggsk.GBR@
orha.centcom.mil
 

The breakdown of civil order in Iraq, after the recent war, disrupted many public health programs including routine childhood vaccinations. In May, the Iraqi Ministry of Health (IMoH) sent teams around the country to assess refrigerated storage sites (cold chain) and the ability of the public health system to provide routine immunizations. At that time, 61% of primary healthcare centers had the equipment and staff to offer daily routine immunizations. The extent of the damage to cold chain equipment varied between the Iraqi governorates and ranged from 12% (Kerbala) to 64% (Missan). The Coalition Provisional Authority and the Iraqi Ministry of Health are working closely with international organizations and non-governmental organizations to re-establish secure public health programs throughout Iraq.

 

Update: Adverse Event Data and Revised American Thoracic Society/CDC Recommendations Against the Use of Rifampin and Pyrazinamide for Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection United States, 2003

CDC and the American Thoracic Society are recommending that the two-month drug regimen of rifampin and pyrazinmide (RZ) not be routinely offered to persons with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI).

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications

CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 6398895
 

These recommendations are also endorsed by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. To date, CDC has identified 48 cases of severe liver injury, including 11 deaths, associated with the use of RZ for LTBI treatment. This article outlines data supporting the change in recommendations, including findings from a CDC survey of more than 100 healthcare providers. The providers surveyed prescribed RZ to nearly 8,000 LTBI patients from January 2000 to June 2002. CDC researchers reported that rates of hospitalization for those receiving RZ were at least 15 times higher than rates for patients receiving the standard treatment regimen of isoniazid (INH). Nine-months of INH continues to be recommended as the optimal LTBI treatment regimen. For more information about LTBI treatment, go to: www.cdc.gov/nchstp/tb/.

 

Pneumococcal Vaccination for Cochlear Implant Candidates and Recipients: Updated Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices

PRESS CONTACT:
John Moran, MD
CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 6398657
or
Jennita Reefhuis, MD
CDC, National Center for Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities
(404) 4983917
 

No summary available.

 

West Nile Virus Activity United States,
July 31 August 6, 2003

PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations

CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 639-3286
 

No summary available.

 

 

 

 


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This page last reviewed August 7, 2003
URL: http://www.cdc.gov/media/mmwrnews/n030808.htm

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