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MMWR
Synopsis for February 7, 2003

The MMWR is embargoed until 12 Noon ET, Thursdays.

  1. HIV/STD Risks in Young Men Who Have Sex with Men Who Do Not Disclose their Sexual Orientation -- Six U.S. Cities, 1994-2000
  2. Hypothermia-Related Deaths -- Philadelphia, 2001, and United States, 1999
  3. Outbreaks of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infections -- Los Angeles, California, 2002–2003

Notice to Readers
Smallpox Vaccine Adverse Events Monitoring and Response System for the First State of the Smallpox Vaccination Program

CDC and the State Health Departments have established a system for the monitoring and responding to adverse events following smallpox vaccination.
Information from this system will be communicated on a regular basis to vaccine safety oversight groups, to public health and medical communities, and to the media. This system will be used to: 1) monitor the occurrence of known events after vaccination, and identify potential new unexpected adverse events; 2) monitor the effectiveness of screening for contraindications to vaccination; 3) identify the potential need for new contraindications to vaccination; and 4) coordinate the distribution of VIG and cidofovir, if these are needed for treatment of patients with certain severe adverse events.

Contact: Division of Media Relations
CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 639–3286


MMWR Reports & Recommendations
February 7, 2003/Vol 52/No. RR-3

Guidelines for Laboratory Testing and Result Reporting of Antibody to Hepatitis C Virus

Contact: Division of Media Relations
CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 639–3286

Telebriefing for February 6, 2003
(Note time change for today's telebriefing)
WHO: Dr. Eric Mast, CDC immunization expert
WHAT: To discuss this week’s MMWR Notice to Readers on the smallpox vaccine adverse events monitoring and response system. Brief remarks followed by Q/A.
WHEN: Thursday, February 6, 2003; 11:00 AM ET
WHERE: At your desk, by toll-free conference line: Dial 866-254-5942
Teleconference name: CDC
A full transcript will be available today following the teleconference and this teleconference will also be audio webcast. Access both at http://www.cdc.gov/media/.

Synopsis for February 7, 2003

HIV/STD Risks in Young Men Who Have Sex with Men Who Do Not Disclose their Sexual Orientation -- Six U.S. Cities, 1994-2000

CDC study finds high prevalence of HIV among African American men who have sex with men, but do not disclose their sexual orientation.

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications

CDC, National Center for HIV, STD & TB Prevention
(404) 639–8895
 

African American men who have sex with men (MSM), but who do not disclose their sexual orientation (nondisclosers), have a high prevalence of HIV infection (14%); nearly three times higher than nondisclosing MSMs of all other races/ethnicities combined (5%). Confirming previous research, the study of 5,589 MSM, aged 15-29 years, in six U.S. cities found that African American MSM were more likely not to disclose their sexual orientation compared with white MSM (18% vs. 8%). HIV-infected nondisclosers were less likely to know their HIV status (98% were unaware of their infection compared with 75% of HIV-positive disclosers), and more likely to have had recent female sex partners. These findings underscore the need for expanded HIV/STD testing and prevention services for nondisclosing MSM, particularly African Americans, and their male and female sex partners.

 

Hypothermia-Related Deaths -- Philadelphia, 2001, and United States, 1999

Hypothermia-related deaths are preventable.

PRESS CONTACT:
Carlos Sanchez, MD, MPH

CDC, National Center for Environmental Health
(404) 498–1376
 

Hypothermia is defined as the unintentional lowering of the deep body (core) temperature below 95.0º F (35.0º C) and can be mild (below 95.0ºF[35.0ºC]), moderate (below 90.0ºF[32.2ºC]) or severe (below 82.4ºF[28ºC]). Common risk factors for hypothermia include exposure to cold while under the influence of alcohol or drugs, altered mental status, and immersion in cold water. Warning symptoms for hypothermia in adults include shivering, confusion, drowsiness, exhaustion, fumbling hands, and slurred speech. Unattended children and persons aged >65 years also are at greater risk for hypothermia. Persons from regions with warmer winters may be at greater risk from the indirect effects of cold weather than persons from regions with colder and longer winters. Avoiding hypothermia prevents other health issues related to exposure to cold weather.

 

Outbreaks of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infections -- Los Angeles, California, 2002–2003

PRESS CONTACT:
Nicole Coffin

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 498–1271
 

No summary available.

 

 

 

 


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URL: http://www.cdc.gov/media/mmwrnews/n030207.htm

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