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MMWR
Synopsis for January 3, 2002

The MMWR is embargoed until 12 Noon ET, Thursdays.

  1. Outbreaks of Salmonella Serotype Enteritidis Infection Associated with Eating Shell Eggs -- United States, 1999-November, 2001
  2. Blood Safety Monitoring Among Persons with Bleeding Disorders -- United States, May 1998-June 2002
There is no telebriefing scheduled for January 2, 2003

Synopsis for January 3, 2002

Outbreaks of Salmonella Serotype Enteritidis Infection Associated with Eating Shell Eggs -- United States, 1999-November, 2001

A concerted prevention effort is needed from farm to table for all eggs to help prevent Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infections.

PRESS CONTACT:
Padmini Srikantiah, MD

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 6392206
 

Repeated investigations have indicated that the most common sources of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infection are undercooked and raw shell eggs. Although rates of culture-confirmed SE infection reported to CDC have declined since the early 1990s, there has been no further decline in the reported cases of SE from 1999 through 2001, and outbreaks associated with shell eggs continue to occur. To achieve sustained reductions in egg-associated SE illnesses, a concerted prevention effort is needed from farmers to consumers. A key factor in SE-control programs is farm-based measures that include routine microbiologic monitoring for the presence of SE. Farm participation in current SE-control programs is voluntary and the components of programs vary. Future shell-egg safety measures should include greater participation in SE-control programs.

 

Blood Safety Monitoring Among Persons with Bleeding Disorders -- United States, May 1998-June 2002

Since 1998, CDC has collaborated with approximately 140 federally funded hemophilia treatment centers, through the Universal Data Collection (UDC), to monitor blood product safety.

PRESS CONTACT:
Anna Kirtava

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 3715257
 

In addition to blood safety concerns, UDC helps to detect viral hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus infections. This report presents findings of an investigation conducted during May 1998-June 2002 that identified 1,149 seroconversions for hepatitis viruses among persons with bleeding disorders who were enrolled voluntarily in UDC. None of these cases was attributable to blood products received during this time period, which indicates that blood factor concentrates used to treat bleeding disorders are unlikely to transmit viral hepatitis. Regular testing of patients is required to ensure the continued safety of blood and blood products.

 


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This page last reviewed January 3, 2002
URL: http://www.cdc.gov/media/mmwrnews/n030103.htm

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