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MMWR
Synopsis for December 13, 2002

The MMWR is embargoed until 12 Noon ET, Thursdays.

  1. Exophiala (Wangiella) Meningitis and Death from Contaminated Injectable Steroids Prepared by a Compounding Pharmacy -- United States, July-November, 2002
  2. Outbreaks of Gastroenteritis Associated with Noroviruses on Cruise Ships -- United States, 2002
  3. Measles Outbreak Among Internationally Adopted Children Arriving in the United States, February-March 2001

MMWR Surveillance Summary
December 13, 2002/Vol. 51/SS-11

Adult Blood Lead Epidemiology and Surveillance — United States, 1998–2001
Elevated blood lead levels (BLLs) in adults can damage the cardiovascular, central nervous, reproductive, hematologic, and renal systems. The majority of cases are workplace-related. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that BLLs among all adults be reduced to <25 ΅g/dL. The highest BLL acceptable by standards of the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration is 40 ΅g/dL. The mean BLL of adults in the United States is <3 ΅g/dL. This report covers cases of adults (aged >16 years) with BLLs >25 ΅g/dL, as reported by 25 states during 1998-2001.

Contact: Robert Roscoe, MS
CDC, National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health
(513) 841–4424

Telebriefing for December 12, 2002
WHO: David Forney and Dr. Elaine Cramer, CDC vessel sanitation inspection experts.
WHAT: To discuss outbreaks of Norwalk-like viruses associated with travel on cruise ships.
Brief remarks followed by Q/A.
WHEN: Thursday, December 12, 2002; Noon ET
WHERE: At your desk, by toll-free conference line: Dial 866-254-5942
Teleconference name: CDC
A full transcript will be available today following the teleconference and this teleconference will also be audio webcast. Access both at http://www.cdc.gov/media/.

Synopsis for December 13, 2002

Exophiala (Wangiella) Meningitis and Death from Contaminated Injectable Steroids Prepared by a Compounding Pharmacy -- United States, July-November, 2002

This report describes five cases of fungal infection associated with contaminated drugs prepared at a compounding pharmacy.

PRESS CONTACT:
Nicole Coffin

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 498-1271
 
In the United States, pharmacists can compound medications to fulfill unique patient drug requirements or to prepare drug products that are not commercially available. As of December 5, five patients have developed Exophiala dermatitidis infection associated with injectable steroids prepared by a compounding pharmacy. The compounded product had been distributed in 11 states. Exophiala is a neutrotropic, dark pigment-forming fungus found in soil and is a rare cause of human illness. In this outbreak, 1 case-patient died.

 

Outbreaks of Gastroenteritis Associated with Noroviruses on Cruise Ships -- United States, 2002

PRESS CONTACT:
Division of Media Relations

CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 639-3286
 
Summary not available.

 

 

 

 

Measles Outbreak Among Internationally Adopted Children Arriving in the United States, February-March 2001

Imported cases of measles continue to affect susceptible U.S. residents.

PRESS CONTACT:
David Kim, MD

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 498-1600
 
A 10-month-old child adopted from an orphanage in China traveled with prodromal fever (an infectious stage of measles) on international and domestic flights on commercial airlines. The child was part of a group of adopted children from China who resided in the same orphanage. The child potentially exposed multiple persons during the communicable period. Subsequent investigations identified 14 U.S. measles cases related to this case. Parents of internationally adopted children should be aware of the importance of assuring that they and their family members are current in their immunizations. Further, soon after arrival in the United States, their adopted children’s immunization status should be updated according to the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices' guidelines.

 


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