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MMWR
Synopsis for July 12, 2002

The MMWR is embargoed until 12 Noon, ET, Thursdays.

  1. Infant Mortality and Low Birth Weight Among Black and White Infants ― United States, 19802000
  2. Update: AIDS ― United States, 2000
  3. Diagnosis and Reporting of HIV and AIDS in States with HIV/AIDS Surveillance ― United States, 19942002

Notice to Readers

Resumption of Routine Schedule for Diphtheria and Tetanus Toxoids and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine and Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Vaccine

Contact: Greg Wallace, MD, MPH
CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 6398715


MMWR Surveillance Summaries
July 12, 2002/Vol. 51/No. SS-5

Hysterectomy Surveillance ― United States, 19941999
From 1994 through 1999, an estimated 3,525,237 hysterectomies were performed among U.S. women aged >15 years, and the overall hysterectomy rate for U.S. female, civilian residents was 5.5 per 1,000 women. Although statistically significant increases for hysterectomy rates were observed from 1994 (5.1/1,000) through 1998 (5.8/1,000), the increase was limited and the curve remained nearly flat.

Contact: Susan Hillis, PhD
CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion
(770) 4886372

Malaria Surveillance ― United States, 2000
CDC received reports of 1,402 cases of malaria with an onset of symptoms during 2000 among persons in the United States or one of its territories. This number represents a decrease of 9.0% from the 1,540 cases reported for 1999. P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. malariae, and P. ovale were identified in 43.6%, 37.2%, 4.8%, and 2.3% of cases, respectively. Nine patients (0.6% of total) were infected by >2 species. The infecting species was unreported or undetermined in 161 (11.5%) cases.

Contact: Louise Causer, MBBS
CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(770) 4887782

Note: The Surveillance Summaries are not attached. The document is available online at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/mmwr_ss.html.


Note: There is no telebriefing scheduled for July 11, 2002.


Synopsis for July 12, 2002

Infant Mortality and Low Birth Weight Among Black and White Infants ― United States, 19802000

Although infant mortality rates have decreased over the last 20 years, the gap between black and white infant mortality continues to widen.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Wanda Barfield, MD, MPH

CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
(770) 4886273
 

In 1980, black infants were two times more likely to die than white infants. In 2000, black infants were 2.5 times more likely to die than white infants. Studies demonstrate that black-white disparities in low birth weight are complex and not explained entirely by demographic risk factors such as maternal age, education or income. Factors that might contribute to the disparity include racial differences in maternal medical conditions, stress, lack of social support, bacterial vaginosis, previous preterm delivery, and maternal health experiences that might be unique to black women. National maternal and infant health objectives for 2010 aim to reduce deaths among infants <1 year to <4.5 per 1,000 live births among all racial/ethnic groups.

 

Update: AIDS ― United States, 2000

The number of new AIDS diagnoses (AIDS incidence) has stabilized.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications

CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 6398895
 

Declines in AIDS deaths have slowed and the number of people living with AIDS has continued to grow. Following sharp declines in AIDS incidence between 1996 and 1998, AIDS incidence in the U.S. has since stabilized at roughly 40,000 diagnoses per year. Trends vary by region, racial/ethnic groups, and HIV exposure category, but have declined or leveled in all areas and groups with the exception of slight increases among those exposed heterosexually, and those residing in the Northeast. The number of AIDS deaths continued to decline between 1996 and 2000, but the rate of decline has slowed in recent years. Further reductions in AIDS incidence and deaths will require improved access to and use of HIV testing, expanded access to care, and improvements in HIV therapies.

 

Diagnosis and Reporting of HIV and AIDS in States with HIV/AIDS Surveillance ― United States, 19942002

HIV diagnoses in these 25 states declined steadily from 1994 through 1999 but stabilized during the latter part of the decade.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications

CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 6398895
 

The overall stability in these states in recent years masks an increase in HIV diagnoses among individuals exposed through heterosexual contact. The majority of diagnoses in these states occurred among African-Americans, pointing to the disproportionate toll of the epidemic in this population. The declines in HIV diagnoses from 1994 through 1999 occurred almost exclusively among 25-44 year-olds and were likely the result of both prevention efforts and declines in HIV incidence from its peak in the late 1980s. HIV diagnoses among 13-24 year-olds, a better indication of recent infections, remained roughly stable throughout the study period. Roughly 25 percent of persons diagnosed with HIV throughout the period of analysis had AIDS at the time of diagnosis.

 


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