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MMWR
Synopsis for June 14, 2002

The MMWR is embargoed until 12 NOON, ET, Thursdays.

  1. Summary of West Nile Virus Activity ― United States, 2001
  2. Update: Influenza Activity ― United States and Worldwide, 2001–02 Season, and Composition of the 2002–03 Influenza Vaccine
  3. Disseminated Infection with Simiae-Avium Group Mycobacteria in Persons with AIDS ― Thailand and Malawi, 1997

MMWR Recommendations and Reports
June 14, 2002, Vol. 51, RR-8

Guidelines for Preventing Opportunistic Infections Among HIV-Infected Persons―2002: Recommendations of the U.S. Public Health Service and the Infectious Diseases Society of America
In 1995, the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) developed guidelines for preventing opportunistic infections (OIs) among persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); these guidelines were updated in 1997 and 1999. This fourth edition of the guidelines, made available on the Internet in 2001, is intended for clinicians and other health-care providers who care for HIV-infected persons. The goal of these guidelines is to provide evidence-based guidelines for preventing OIs among HIV-infected adults and adolescents, including pregnant women, and HIV-exposed or infected children.

Contact: Office of Communication
CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 639–8895

Telebriefing, June 13, 2002
WHO: Drs. Daniel O'Leary and Steve Ostroff, infectious diseases experts
WHAT: To discuss this week's MMWR article on West Nile Virus. Brief remarks followed by Q/A.
WHEN: Thursday, June 13, 2002; Noon–12:30 PM ET
WHERE: At your desk, by toll-free conference line: Dial 866-254-5942
Teleconference name: CDC
A full transcript of this teleconference will be available today following the teleconference on the CDC website at www.cdc.gov/media.

This teleconference will also be audio webcast. Listen LIVE online at www.cdc.gov/media.

Synopsis for June 14, 2002

Summary of West Nile Virus Activity ― United States, 2001

West Nile Virus (WNV) activity has been detected throughout the eastern half of the United States, and has established itself permanently in North America.

PRESS CONTACT:
John Roehrig, PhD

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(970) 221–6417

 

In 2001, WNV activity was reported to CDC from 359 counties in 27 states and the District of Columbia (D.C.). This was a marked increase from 2000 when WNV activity was reported from 138 counties in 12 states and D.C. In 2001, fifteen states without any prior reports of WNV activity in animals detected infected birds, horses, or mosquitoes. Human cases of WNV disease were reported from 10 states; seven states reported human cases for the first time. Horses were the only non-human mammals reported to CDC with WNV infection in 2001. The apparent geographic limits of WNV activity in 2001 were marked by reports of dead WNV-infected birds from western Arkansas, southern Maine, and southern Florida.

 

Update: Influenza Activity ― United States and Worldwide, 2001–02 Season, and Composition of the 2002–03 Influenza Vaccine

Clinicians should consider influenza A and B when diagnosing a febrile respiratory illness during the summer.

PRESS CONTACT:
Pauline Terebuh, MD, MPH

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 639–3747
 

The 2001-02 influenza season was mild to moderate in the United States. Influenza A (H3N2) viruses predominated, but influenza B viruses were identified more frequently toward the end of the season. Outbreaks of influenza B continue to be reported, especially among school-aged children. An influenza B strain that had not been detected in the United States since 1990, began to circulate again during the past season. Therefore, the influenza B component of the influenza vaccine will be updated for the 2002-03 season. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has made important changes in the recommendations for the 2002-03 season. Vaccination of healthy children aged 6-23 months and close contact of children aged 0-23 months is encouraged because young, healthy children are at increased risk for influenza-related hospitalization. As in previous years, vaccination of children ³ 6 months who have certain high-risk medical conditions including asthma, lung or heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, immunosuppressive diseases, or are on chronic aspirin therapy is strongly recommended.

 

Disseminated Infection with Simiae-Avium Group Mycobacteria in Persons with AIDS ― Thailand and Malawi, 1997

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communication

CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 639–8895
 

Summary not available.

 

 

 

 


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