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MMWR
Synopsis for January 17, 2002

The MMWR is embargoed until noon EST.

  1. Fibrosing Skin Condition Among Patients with Renal Disease United States and Europe, 1997-2001
  2. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Activity-United States, 2000-2001 Season
  3. Lyme Disease United States, 2000
MEDIA TELEBRIEFING
WHO: Stacie Marshall, CDC epidemiologist
Ned Hayes, CDC medical epidemiologist
WHAT: To discuss this week's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) article, "Lyme Disease United States, 2000." According to the study, Lyme Disease a tick-borne bacterial illness continues to increase in prevalence in the United States. Brief remarks followed by Q/A.
WHEN: Thursday, January 17, 2002; 12 Noon 12:30 PM ET
WHERE: At your desk, by toll-free conference line: Dial 866-254-5942
Teleconference name: CDC
WHY: Learn more about Lyme disease, an important emerging infectious disease in the U.S.

A full transcript of this teleconference will be available today following the teleconference on the CDC website at www.cdc.gov/media. This teleconference will also be audio webcast. Listen LIVE online at www.cdc.gov/media.


Synopsis for January 17, 2002

Fibrosing Skin Condition Among Patients with Renal Disease United States and Europe, 1997-2001

 

PRESS CONTACT:
Michelle Goveia, MD, MPH
(510) 622-4421
California Department of Health Services

 

Since 1997, 49 people suffering from poor kidney function in the United States and Europe have been diagnosed with a new skin condition. Patients with this condition have large areas of raised and hardened skin on their extremities and trunk and severe skin tightening and thickening, which leads to limited mobility. This condition most closely resembles a rare disease called scleromyxedema; however, this new condition has several distinct differences that are seen clinically and on biopsy. A study, comparing eight patients with this disease and 24 patients without it, concluded that patients with this new skin condition were more likely to have poorer renal function after kidney transplantation. The eight patients were also more likely to require hemodialysis and receive medications associated with severe renal disease. However, the exact cause of the new skin disease is unknown and will require further study.

 

Respiratory Syncytial Virus Activity-United States, 2000-2001 Season

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Ashley Lamonte, MPH
(404) 639-4830
CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
 

The National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) monitors the spread of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), documenting annual RSV outbreaks in the United States, primarily during winter months from November through May. RSV is considered the most common cause of lower respiratory illness among infants and young children worldwide. However, serious lower respiratory tract infections associated with RSV can also occur among persons with compromised respiratory, cardiac, or immune systems and the elderly. By November 3, 2001, RSV reached levels of widespread activity in the United States. As a result, health care providers should consider RSV as a cause of acute respiratory disease in both children and adults.

 

Lyme Disease United States, 2000

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Stacie Marshall, MPH
(970) 221-6400
CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
 

The trend of increasing prevalence of Lyme disease is continuing in the United States, according to latest data analyzed. Lyme disease, a tick-borne bacterial illness, continues to be an important emerging infectious disease in the United States. As expected, most cases of Lyme disease were reported from states in the northeast, mid-Atlantic, and north-central regions. Most cases of Lyme disease arise from tick exposures in late spring and early summer. Children and older adults are at highest risk of infection. Lyme disease can be prevented by reducing tick populations, avoiding tick-infested areas, using repellents, promptly removing attached ticks, and vaccination. Complications of infection can be reduced by early diagnosis and correct treatment. CDC-sponsored community Lyme disease prevention projects have been initiated in four states with high rates of Lyme disease.

 


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