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MMWR
Synopsis for September 21, 2001

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m., ET, Thursdays.

  1. Shigellosis Outbreak Associated with an Unchlorinated Fill-and-Drain Wading Pool — Iowa, 2001
  2. Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to Fluoroquinolones — United States, 1995–1999
  3. Weekly Update: West Nile Virus Activity — United States, September 11-18, 2001

Notice to Readers

FDA Approval for a Combined Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B Vaccine

The Food and Drug Administration has licensed a combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccine (Twinrixฎ) for use among persons 18 years of age and older. The antigenic components in Twinrixฎ have been used routinely in separate single antigen vaccines in the United States since 1995 and 1989.

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Synopsis for September 21, 2001

Shigellosis Outbreak Associated with an Unchlorinated Fill-and-Drain Wading Pool — Iowa, 2001

Outbreaks of illness associated with recreational water use have increased in recent years.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communication

CDC, Media Relations Division
(404) 639–3286
 

Although outbreaks of recreational water illness have been increasing over the past decade, many of these outbreaks can be prevented. Bacterial outbreaks, such as reported from Iowa, should not occur if aquatic facilities are disinfected and pool water quality is maintained appropriately. In this outbreak the wading pool was unchlorinated and was frequented by diaper- and toddler-aged children who may be more likely to be infected with Shigella. Shigellosis is caused by bacteria. Most people who are infected develop diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps starting a day or two after they are exposed. More information on recreational water illness can be found online at: www.cdc.gov/healthyswimming. More information on Shigellosis is online at www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dbmd/diseaseinfo/shigellosis_g.htm.

 

Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to Fluoroquinolones — United States, 1995–1999

Fluoroquinolones are important agents for treating pneumococcal infections and community-acquired pneumonia.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communication

CDC, Media Relations Division
(404) 639–3286
 

Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia, meningitis, and otitis media in the United States. Because of the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in pneumococci, fluoroquinolones are now recommended by some groups for the treatment of pneumonia in adults, especially when antibiotic-resistance is suspected. This report indicates that pneumococci with reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones are appearing in the United States. Appropriate use of antibiotics is crucial for slowing emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance. If fluoroquinolone resistance becomes more common, clinical laboratories should consider routine susceptibility testing of fluoroquinolones on invasive pneumococcal isolates.

 

Weekly Update: West Nile Virus Activity — United States, September 11-18, 2001

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communication

CDC, Media Relations Division
(404) 639–3286
 
Beginning with this issue, the MMWR will feature timely updates of West Nile Virus (WNV) activities in the United States. The reports will include information on human cases and deaths, infected birds and other animals, and WNV-positive mosquito pools.

 


 

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