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MMWR
Synopsis for August 17, 2001

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m., EST, Thursdays.

  1. Human Anthrax Associated with an Epizootic Among Livestock North Dakota, 2000
  2. Botulism Outbreak Associated with Eating Fermented Food Alaska, 2001
  3. Self-Reported Asthma Prevalence Among Adults United States, 2000

Synopsis for August 17, 2001

Human Anthrax Associated with an Epizootic Among Livestock North Dakota, 2000

This report presents the first case of cutaneous anthrax in the United States since 1992.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
David Ashford, M.D.

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 6394728
 

In the United States, the annual incidence of human anthrax declined from approximately 200 cases in the early 1900s to no human cases in 1992. Anthrax most commonly occurs in both wild and domestic mammals (e.g., cattle, sheep, goats, camels and other herbivores). In this report, a 67-year-old man in North Dakota, who helped dispose of five cows that had died of anthrax, was diagnosed with cutaneous anthrax. This case was associated with an outbreak of anthrax in North Dakota that resulted in 32 farms being quarantined in 2000. Although 157 animals died, no other cases of anthrax in humans have been identified in North Dakota.

 

Botulism Outbreak Associated with Eating Fermented Food Alaska, 2001

The risks for foodborne botulism in Alaska can be reduced by boiling fermented foods before eating, and by avoiding foods fermented by non-traditional methods.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Kip Baggett, M.D.

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(907) 7293435 (Alaska)
 

An outbreak of foodborne botulism occurred in a southwest Alaska village in January 2001. Disease was associated with eating fermented foods, which are an important part of the Alaska Native diet. The implicated foods were fermented by non-traditional methods, which appear to increase the risk for botulism. Local health officials and CDC are working together to develop a prevention strategy that emphasizes a return to traditional fermentation methods. This message has been incorporated into an educational video produced in English and an Alaskan Native language. Alaska has the highest rate of foodborne botulism in the United States.

 

Self-Reported Asthma Prevalence Among Adults United States, 2000

Asthma is a chronic disease which affects both children and adults in the United States.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Stephen Redd, M.D.

CDC, National Center for Environmental Health
(404) 4981000
 

This report provides the first estimates of self-reported asthma prevalence data for U.S. adults for all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. It uses state data collected from the 2000 Behavioral Risk Factor Survey System (BRFSS) survey, which estimates the portion of adults 18 years or older in each state, with lifetime asthma and current asthma. This data will allow states health departments to monitor trends in asthma prevalence and to provide data to direct asthma management. Overall, 14.6 million U.S. adults report current asthma. This represents approximately 7.2% of the adult population. This study also found that current asthma was reported by 9.1% of adult women and 5.1% of men.

 


 

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