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MMWR
Synopsis for July 13, 2001

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. E.S.T. Thursday.

  1. Congenital Syphilis United States, 2000
  2. Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Infection Among Clients at HIV Counseling and Testing Sites Connecticut, 1999

Notice to Readers

Division of Media Relations
CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 6393286

Delayed Influenza Vaccine Availability for 200102 Season and Supplemental Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

Because of the 200102 influenza season vaccine delay and the large number of doses projected for distribution in November and December, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has developed supplemental recommendations.


MMWR Reports & Recommendations
July 13, 2001/Vo. 50/No. RR-12

Contact: Laura Zimmerman, M.D.
CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 6398690

Control and Prevention of Rubella: Evaluation and Management of Suspected Outbreaks, Rubella in Pregnant Women, and Surveillance for Congenital Rubella Syndrome

Outbreaks of rubella continue to occur in the United States despite widespread use of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Throughout the mid- to late-1990s, rubella outbreaks were characterized by increased numbers of cases among adults born in countries that do not have or have only recently instituted a national rubella vaccination program.


Synopsis for July 13, 2001

Congenital Syphilis United States, 2000

The syphilis rate among infants in 2000 declined by 51 percent since 1997, the year before the CDC launched a national campaign to eliminate the disease in the United States.

 

PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications

CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 6398895
 


In 2000, only 529 cases of congenital syphilis (13.4 cases per 100,000 live births) were reported in the United States, compared to 1,077 cases, (27.8 cases per 100,000 live births) in 1997, according to this study. Women with syphilis, who are not treated, may give birth to infected infants, who are neurologically impaired, have seizures or die during or after birth. The overall declines may be attributed to syphilis elimination programs initiated in recent years by CDC in collaboration with state and local partners. Access to and use of comprehensive prenatal care are crucial to the prevention of congenital syphilis. CDC recommends that health care providers test all women for syphilis during the early stages of pregnancy. Because stillborn delivery can be due to syphilis infection, all women who deliver a stillborn infant after 20 weeks of gestation should also be tested for syphilis and treated if infected.

 

Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Infection Among Clients at HIV Counseling and Testing Sites Connecticut, 19999

Hepatitis C counseling and testing services should be integrated into existing public health programs that offer HIV counseling and testing.

 

PRESS CONTACT:
Joanna Buffington, M.D., M.P.H.

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 3715910
 


Injection drug use is a major risk factor for infection with multiple blood borne viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Publicly funded HIV counseling and testing sites may be important settings for provision of hepatitis prevention and control services. The Connecticut Department of Public Health found that over seven times as many clients tested in these public sites had evidence of exposure to HCV, compared with HIV infection. Over 66% of persons reporting injection drug use anytime since 1978 had evidence of HCV infection. In HIV counseling and testing sites located in substance abuse treatment settings, over 40% of persons, regardless of reported risk factor, had evidence of HCV infection, compared with just under 7% of persons tested for HIV in sites not associated with substance abuse treatment programs.

 


 

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