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MMWR
Synopsis for June 22, 2001

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. EST Thursdays.

  1. Vitamin A Deficiency Among Children Micronesia, 2000
  2. Measles Incidence Before and After Supplementary Vaccination Activities Lusaka, Zambia, 19962000

MMWR Reports & Recommendations
June 22, 2001/Vol. 50/No. RR-10

Contact: Division of Media Relations
CDC, Office of Communication
(404) 6393286

Vaccinia (Smallpox) Vaccine: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2001
These revised recommendations regarding vaccinia (smallpox) vaccine update the previous Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations (MMWR 1991;40; No. RR-14:1-10) and include current information regarding the non-emergency use of vaccinia vaccine among laboratory and health-care workers occupationally exposed to vaccinia virus, recombinant vaccinia viruses, and other Orthopoxviruses that can infect humans. In addition, this report contains ACIP's recommendations for the use of vaccinia vaccine if smallpox (variola) virus were used as an agent of biological terrorism or if a smallpox outbreak were to occur for another unforeseen reason.


Synopsis for June 22, 2001

Vitamin A Deficiency Among Children Micronesia, 2000

Vitamin A deficiency is a severe public health problem among pre-school children in the Federated States of Micronesia.

 

PRESS CONTACT:
Perpetua Socorro Gonzaga, M.D.

CDC, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities
(770) 4887483
 


Vitamin A deficiency is a severe public health problem among pre-school children with a prevalence of 63.3% in Kosrae state and 33.8% in Yap proper, in the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM). In this country, vitamin A deficiency is found in children who do not appear to have other nutritional deficits. It is very likely that the vitamin A deficiency problem extends to other segments of the population. The current efforts to provide targeted population supplementation through vitamin A capsule distribution is not sufficient to fully address this problem. A comprehensive, multi-faceted, long term approach to promote sustained improvement in vitamin A status is necessary to address the pervasive problem of vitamin A deficiency in FSM.

 

Measles Incidence Before and After Supplementary Vaccination Activities Lusaka, Zambia, 19962000

In March 2001, the World Health Organization set a goal for reducing global measles deaths by 50% by 2005.

 

PRESS CONTACT:
Gustavo Dayan

CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 6398115
 


In Zambia, measles is 1 of the 5 major causes of sicknesses and deaths among children 5 years of age and younger. In August 1999, supplementary vaccination activities (SVAs) were conducted in Lusaka, Zambia. Although conducted in accordance with WHO recommendations, SVAs in Lusaka had limited impact on measles morbidity and mortality during the 11-month period following the intervention. Possible reasons for this include vaccination coverage during SVAs was no greater than the routine coverage achieved in earlier years; SVAs were restricted to children 959 months (approximately 20 percent of recorded measles cases occurred among persons 5 years of age and older); and SVAs were limited to urban areas. Future SVAs should target a wider age group and geographic area. Additionally, improvements in the vaccination infrastructure and surveillance are needed.

 


 

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