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MMWR
Synopsis for October 27, 2000

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. E.S.T. Thursdays.

  1. Levels of Diabetes-Related Preventive-Care Practices — United States, 1997-1999
  2. End-Stage Renal Disease Treatment Attributed to Diabetes Among American Indians/Alaska Natives With Diabetes — United States, 1990–1996
  3. Folate Status in Women of Childbearing Age— United States, 1999
 

MMWR
Synopsis for October 27, 2000

Levels of Diabetes-Related Preventive-Care Practices — United States, 1997-1999

Preventive care practices by persons with diabetes needs improvement.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Edward Tierney, M.P.H.

CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion
(770) 488–1263
 

Data from 40 states during1997-1999 indicate low levels of preventive care practices and a wide gap between current state levels and the Healthy People 2010 goals for people with diabetes. In general, levels of preventive care were lowest among persons living in the south, persons without health insurance, and persons with less than a high school education. Collaborative efforts among health-care systems, health-care providers, public health officials, and patients are needed to identify effective mechanisms for delivering improved quality care to people with diabetes. Healthy People 2010 objectives include increasing the proportion of people with diabetes who: 1) have an annual dilated eye exam to 75%, 2) have an annual foot examination to 75%, 3) perform self-monitoring of their blood glucose at least once daily to 60%, and 4) have a glycosylated hemoglobin measurement at least once a year to 50%.

 

End-Stage Renal Disease Treatment Attributed to Diabetes Among American Indians/Alaska Natives With Diabetes — United States, 1990–1996

Chronic kidney failure, attributable to diabetes, is a disabling condition associated with high mortality and is likely to continue to increase among AI/AN.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Nilka Ríos Burrow, M.P.H.

CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion
(770) 488–1263
 

Diabetes is the leading cause of chronic kidney failure; i.e., kidney failure requiring dialysis or kidney transplantation. Among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) with diabetes, chronic kidney failure, attributable to diabetes, increased between 1990 and 1996, particularly among those < 45 years. The relative increase in the age-adjusted rate of initiation of treatment for chronic kidney failure was higher among AI/AN women with diabetes than men (32% vs. 14%). Between 1990 and 1996, the rate of initiation of treatment for chronic kidney failure increased in all age groups — 58% among those < 45 years, 9% among those 45–64 years, and 34% among those > 65 years.

 

Folate Status in Women of Childbearing Age— United States, 1999 

Food fortification has been a successful method of increasing blood folate levels in women of childbearing age.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Sandra Smith, M.P.H.

CDC, National Center for Health Statistics
(404) 639–2215
 

Blood folate levels for American women of childbearing age nearly tripled according to the latest data from CDC's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The 1999 survey findings show that mean serum folate — a measure of the average level of folic acid in the blood — rose from 6.3 to 16.2 ng/mL among women 15-44 years. This increase in blood folate (due primarily to food fortification) will potentially reduce a woman's risk of having a baby born with a birth defect of the spine or brain (spina bifida or anencephaly). Food fortification, rather than supplements, was determined to be the best strategy for increasing blood folate levels because the critical period for adequate folic acid is the first weeks of pregnancy before most women know they are pregnant. Since 1998, all enriched cereals and grain products produced in the United States have been fortified with folic acid.


 

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