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MMWR
Synopsis for October 13, 2000

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. E.S.T. Thursdays.

  1. Outbreak of Rift Valley Fever — Saudi Arabia, August–October, 2000
  2. Measuring Childhood Asthma Prevalence Before and After the 1997 Redesign of the National Health Interview Survey — United States
  3. Outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infection Associated with Eating Fresh Cheese Curds — Wisconsin, June 1998
  4. Enterovirus Surveillance — United States, 1997–1999
 

MMWR
Synopsis for October 13, 2000

Outbreak of Rift Valley Fever — Saudi Arabia, August–October, 2000

Rift Valley Fever is transmitted primarily by contact with infected animal body fluids and mosquito bites.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Pierre Rollin, M.D.

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 639–1115
 

On September 10, 2000, the Ministry of Health (MOH), Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and subsequently the Ministry of Health of Yemen received reports of unexplained hemorrhagic fever in humans and associated animal deaths from the southwestern border of Saudi Arabia and Yemen. As of October 9 in Saudi Arabia, 316 persons with suspected severe Rift Valley Fever (RVF) have been reported from primary health-care centers and hospitals. RVF is a mosquito-borneviral disease predominantly causing abortion and deaths of young animals (e.g., sheep and goats). Epizootic and epidemic transmission is associated with periodic heavy rainfall. Human infection is predominately not apparent or is associated with a brief self-limited febrile illness. However, complications such as retinitis, hemorrhagic fever, or encephalitis occur in some patients.

 

Measuring Childhood Asthma Prevalence Before and After the 1997 Redesign of the National Health Interview Survey — United States

Although childhood asthma has recently decreased, the redesign of the National Health Interview Survey precludes making conclusions about recent trends in asthma.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Lara Akinbami, M.D.

CDC, National Center for Health Statistics
(301) 458–4306
 

Over the past two decades, childhood asthma prevalence increased dramatically. The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), the principal source of asthma prevalence data for the U.S., underwent a major redesign in 1997. The redesigned survey produces more specific estimates of asthma attack prevalence which are not comparable to asthma prevalence estimates prior to 1997. Asthma prevalence among 0-17 year old children increased 4.9% per year from 1980-1995. The 1996 estimate of 62 per 1,000 children was 17% lower than in 1995 (75 per 1,000). The 1997 and 1998 asthma attack prevalence estimates were 54 and 53 per 1,000 respectively. While the 1997 redesign of the NHIS has created a break in the trend of asthma prevalence, no conclusions can be made about very recent changes in asthma prevalence.

 

Outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infection Associated with Eating Fresh Cheese Curds — Wisconsin, June 1998

Fresh cheese curds from a diary plant may have been the source of an outbreak of E. coli in Wisconsin.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Mary Proctor, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Wisconsin Division of Public Health
(608) 267–9005
 

Raw milk and raw milk products have repeatedly been associated with human illness including those caused by E. coli O157:H7, campylobacteriosis, salmonellosis, listeriosis, brucellosis, and cryptosporidium. This outbreak investigation illustrates that when both raw and pasteurized product are made on the same day on the same production line, there is the potential for mislabeling or cross-contamination of pasteurized product by equipment or with ingredients used to prepare raw milk product. Consumption of raw milk and dairy products made with raw milk products is a risky behavior. While the very young, the elderly and those with weakened immune systems should avoid consuming products made with raw milk, all individuals should be aware of the increased risk of these products. During June 1998, 55 persons from 7 counties became ill after eating fresh cheese curds.

 

Enterovirus Surveillance — United States, 1997–1999

Enteroviruses are among the most common viruses which account for an estimated 10–15 million infections in the United States each year.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Nino Khetsuriani, M.D., Ph.D.

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 639–3596
 

Enteroviruses are associated with a wide range of diseases including upper respiratory illness, aseptic meningitis, hand-foot-and-mouth disease, encephalitis, carditis, poliomyelitis, etc. This report summarizes data on enterovirus isolations reported to CDC during 1997–1999. During this period, echovirus 30 was the most common nonpolio enterovirus isolated in the United States, followed by echovirus 11, echovirus 9, and echovirus 6. In addition to nonpolio enteroviruses, vaccine-related polioviruses continued to circulate. However, reports of vaccine-related poliovirus isolations declined considerably during 1997-1999. This decline is likely due to declining use of oral polio vaccine beginning in 1999, and the expanded use of inactivated polio vaccine.


 

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