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MMWR
Synopsis for June 23, 2000

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. E.S.T. Thursdays.

  1. National HIV Testing Day at CDC-Funded HIV Counseling, Testing, and Referral Sites — United States, 1994–1998
  2. Laboratory-Acquired Human Glanders — Maryland, May 2000
  3. Contribution of Assisted Reproductive Technology and Ovulation-Inducing Drugs to Triplet and Higher-Order Multiple Births — United States, 1980–1997
  4. Trends in Gonorrhea Rates — Selected States and United States, 1998
  5. Update: Clostridium novyi and Unexplained Illness Among Injecting-Drug Users — Glasgow, Scotland; Dublin, Ireland; and England, April–June 2000
 

MMWR
Synopsis for June 23, 2000

National HIV Testing Day at CDC-Funded HIV Counseling, Testing, and Referral Sites — United States, 1994–1998

National HIV Testing day leads to increases in HIV testing.

 
PRESS CONTACT: 
Office of Communications

CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 639–8895

 

June 27 is National HIV Testing Day, an annual campaign to encourage Americans who are at risk for HIV infection to learn whether or not they are infected. To evaluate the success of previous testing day efforts, CDC analyzed the level of HIV testing for the week of testing day, compared to the week prior. Data collected by CDC-funded HIV counseling, testing and referral sites show an increase in the number of tests performed during the week of testing day. This increase was seen for each year data was available, beginning in the first year of the campaign (1995) through 1998. In 1998, there were 5,523 additional tests, including 70 additional HIV-positive results.

 

Laboratory-Acquired Human Glanders — Maryland, May 2000

 
PRESS CONTACT:
David Ashford, M.D.

CDC, Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 371–5335
 
Summary not available.  








Contribution of Assisted Reproductive Technology and Ovulation-Inducing Drugs to Triplet and Higher-Order Multiple Births — United States, 1980–1997

Of the 6737 triplet and higher-order multiples born in 1997, 43% were conceived using assisted reproductive technology (ART).

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Kathy Harben

CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion
(770) 488–5131
 
Pregnancies associated with ART are more likely than spontaneously conceived pregnancies to result in triplet and higher-order multiple births. Of the 6737 triplet births in 1997, only 18% were naturally occurring triplets; 43% were known to be conceived using ART; the remaining 38% were not explained by our data but are believed to be in large part due to ovulation drugs without ART. Compared to single births, both mothers and babies experience greater health risks during multiple births, including cesarean section and hemorrhage for the mothers and low birth weight, preterm delivery, and death for the babies. Due to the morbidity and mortality associated with them, continued efforts are needed to reduce the risk of multi-fetal pregnancies resulting from ART and ovulation-inducing drugs.

 

Trends in Gonorrhea Rates — Selected States and United States, 1998

After a 13-year decline, U.S. gonorrhea rates are increasing.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications

CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 639–8895
 
From 1997 to 1998, overall gonorrhea rates increased by more than 8%. This was the first rise in the gonorrhea rate in 13 years. Prior to this upswing, gonorrhea rates declined by 64% from 1985 to 1997. The Midwest reported the highest increase with more than a 16% jump, followed by the south with almost 9% and the west by 6.5%. The northeast was the only region to report a decline in rates, although it was less than one percent. Women showed a more than 10%t upturn, compared to nearly seven and half percent in men. The gonorrhea rates in African-Americans also increased from 1997 to 1998 by more than 13%, Hispanics by almost 16%, Asian/Pacific Islanders by nearly 20% and American Indians and Alaska Natives by 17%. In two states that were surveyed, increased gonorrhea rates in men who have sex with men also were reported and may be related to an increase in unsafe sex practices.

 

Update: Clostridium novyi and Unexplained Illness Among Injecting-Drug Users — Glasgow, Scotland; Dublin, Ireland; and England, April–June 2000

This report is an update of the ongoing investigation of unexplained illness among injecting-drug users (IDUs) in Scotland, Ireland and England.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Marc Fischer, M.D.

CDC, Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 639–3158
 
Since April 19, 2000, health officials in Scotland, Ireland, England and the United States have been investigating an outbreak of unexplained illness and death among IDUs in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Initial testing from case-patients has indicated that Clostridium novyi may be associated with these illnesses. Several Clostridium species have been previously implicated in clusters of wound infections among IDUs. Efforts in the ongoing investigation will further characterize these illnesses, confirm the role of C. novyi as the cause for the outbreak, identify risk factors for disease, and implement prevention measures. In Ireland, cases have remained limited to Dublin, and in Scotland cases have been reported from both the Glasgow and Aberdeen areas. No cases associated with this outbreak have been reported in the United States.


 

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