Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 CDC Home Search Health Topics A-Z

CDC Media Relations
Media Home | Contact Us
US Department of Health and Human Services logo and link

Media Relations Links
• About Us
• Media Contact
• Frequently Asked Questions
• Media Site Map

CDC News
• Press Release Library
• Transcripts
• MMWR Summaries
• B-Roll Footage
• Upcoming Events

Related Links
• Centers at CDC
• Data and Statistics
• Health Topics A-Z
• Image Library
• Publications, Software and Other Products
• Global Health Odyssey
Find your state or local health department
HHS News
National Health Observances
Visit the FirstGov Web Site
Div. of Media Relations
1600 Clifton Road
MS D-14
Atlanta, GA 30333
(404) 639-3286
Fax (404) 639-7394


MMWR
Synopsis for April 14, 2000

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. E.S.T. Thursdays.

  1. Salmonellosis Associated with Chick and Ducklings — Michigan and Missouri, Spring 1999
  2. Measles Outbreak in the Netherlands, April 1999–January 2000
  3. Fatal Yellow Fever in a Traveler Returning from Venezuela, 1999
 

MMWR
Synopsis for April 14, 2000

Salmonellosis Associated with Chick and Ducklings — Michigan and Missouri, Spring 1999

Avoid contact with the feces of young fowl, and carefully wash your hands with soap and water after handling these animals and anything that has come in contact with them.

 
PRESS CONTACT: 
Kammy Johnson, D.V.M., Ph.D.

CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 639–2206
Handling chicks and ducklings poses a health risk, particularly for children. Such exposures may occur more commonly during the spring or Easter season. The risk posed by chicks and ducklings may be highest for children since Salmonella infections in children may be more severe, and children are often recipients of chicks or ducklings as pets. To prevent the transmission of Salmonella from chicks, ducklings, and other young fowl to people, avoid contact with feces and carefully wash your hands with soap and water after handling young fowl or anything that has come in contact with them. Chicks, ducklings, and other young fowl may not be appropriate pets for children. These animals should not be kept in households with infants, young children, or immunocompromised persons who are at highest risk for illness or serious disease.

 

Measles Outbreak in the Netherlands, April 1999 – January 2000

Measles is a severe disease that can result in death even in industrialized countries.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Dalya Guris, M.D., M.P.H.

CDC, National Immunization Program
(770) 488–8757
A large outbreak of measles occurred in the Netherlands in 1999. This outbreak mainly affected members of a religious group, many of whom refused vaccination on religious grounds. Although nationwide measles vaccination coverage is over 95% in the Netherlands, vaccination coverage is low in municipalities with large religious communities. Between April 15, 1999 and February 4, 2000, 2961 cases of measles were reported. Ninety-nine percent of the cases were unvaccinated. Three measles case-patients died and 68 were hospitalized because of measles-related complications. Although measles is more severe in malnourished or immunosuppressed persons, severe disease or death may result in persons with no underlying disease. Measles sometimes is considered a mild disease; however, this outbreak underlines the fact that severe cases of measles may result in death.  

 

Fatal Yellow Fever in a Traveler Returning from Venezuela, 1999

Persons traveling to yellow fever (YF) endemic areas should be vaccinated before taking their trip.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Martin Cetron, M.D.

CDC, National Center for for Infectious Diseases
(404) 639-8100
This report describes the second cases of imported, fatal YF in a U.S. resident returning from South America, since 1996. A 48-year-old man from California sought treatment at a local emergency department in September 1999. The patient had recently returned from a 10-day trip to Venezuela (He did not receive YF vaccine before his trip.) He died on October 4, 1999. There is epidemiologic evidence of increasing transmission of yellow fever in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. Yellow fever vaccine is a safe and effective vaccine. Persons traveling to areas where yellow fever is endemic should receive yellow fever vaccine before travel. In addition, these travelers should avoid exposure to mosquitoes by using repellents, wearing protective clothing, and remaining in well-screened or air-conditioned areas where possible.


 

Media Home | Contact Us

CDC Home | Search | Health Topics A-Z

This page last reviewed Friday, April 14, 2000
URL:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Office of Communication