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MMWR
Synopsis for February 11, 2000

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. E.S.T. Thursdays.

  1. Age-Specific Excess Deaths Associated with Stroke Among Racial/Ethnic Groups United States, 1997
  2. Elevated Blood Lead Levels Among Internationally Adopted Children United States, 1998
  3. Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents One Year Before the Institution of a Seventh Grade School Entry Vaccination Requirement San Diego, California, 1998

MMWR
Synopsis for February 11, 2000

Age-Specific Excess Deaths Associated with Stroke Among Racial/Ethnic Groups United States, 1997

Deaths from stroke can be reduced or delayed by preventing and controlling certain high-risk behaviors.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Carma Ayala, M.P.H., Ph.D.
CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion
(770) 4882424
African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian and Pacific Islander, and Hispanic adults, especially those 35-64 years of age, are more likely to die from stroke than white adults. Deaths from stroke can be reduced or delayed by preventing and controlling risk factors such as hypertension, cigarette smoking, overweight, diabetes, and physical inactivity. Reducing stroke deaths among 35- to 64-year-old men and women in these groups largely depends on reaching them early, before they adopt unhealthy behaviors. Public health efforts must focus on primary and secondary prevention strategies among younger ages of these high-risk groups. The greatest disparities in death rates are found between African Americans and white adults. African Americans 35-54 years of age are 4 times more likely to die from a stroke than white adults of the same age.

 

Elevated Blood Lead Levels Among Internationally Adopted Children United States, 1998

International adoptees may arrive in the United States with lead poisoning.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Lisa Rosenblum, M.D., M.P.H.
CDC, National Center for Environmental Health
(404) 6392510
A survey of international adoption medical specialists showed that the prevalence of elevated blood lead levels (>= 10 ug/dl) among young Chinese immigrant children was generally higher (8-13%) than the prevalence among US children (2%-6%). Immigrant children younger than 15 years of age are not required to have any serologic or blood tests either in their country of origin or upon entry into the United States unless there is reason to suspect infection with syphilis or HIV. International adoptees coming from countries where lead poisoning is prevalent should be screened after arrival to the United States. Children with elevated blood lead levels should receive follow-up care in accordance with CDC guidelines and state and local laws.

 

Vaccination Coverage Among Adolescents One Year Before the Institution of a Seventh Grade School Entry Vaccination Requirement San Diego, California, 1998

Adolescents should receive all recommended vaccinations.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Francisco Averhoff, M.D. M.P.H.
CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 6398209
A survey of 5th and 6th graders in San Diego, California, one year before the initiation of 7th grade school entry vaccination requirement, found that a minority had received all recommended vaccinations. Hepatitis B vaccine, which along with measles, mumps and rubella vaccine are included in the new requirement, had very low coverage in this population; only 16% had received the recommended three doses. Without school entry requirements, many adolescents remain at risk for vaccine preventable diseases. Several national organizations interested in the health of adolescents advocate a goal of 90% vaccination coverage with all recommended adolescent vaccinations by the year 2002.

 


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