Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
 CDC Home Search Health Topics A-Z

CDC Media Relations
Media Home | Contact Us
US Department of Health and Human Services logo and link

Media Relations Links
About Us
Media Contact
Frequently Asked Questions
Media Site Map

CDC News
Press Release Library
Transcripts
MMWR Summaries
B-Roll Footage
Upcoming Events

Related Links
Centers at CDC
Data and Statistics
Health Topics A-Z
Image Library
Publications, Software and Other Products
Global Health Odyssey
Find your state or local health department
HHS News
National Health Observances
Visit the FirstGov Web Site
Div. of Media Relations
1600 Clifton Road
MS D-14
Atlanta, GA 30333
(404) 639-3286
Fax (404) 639-7394


MMWR
Synopsis for February 4, 2000

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. Eastern time on Thursday.

  1. Outbreaks of Salmonella Serotype Enteritidis Infection Associated with Eating Raw Shell Eggs United States, 19961998
  2. Prevalence of Selected Risk Factors for Chronic Disease and Injury Among American Indians and Alaska Natives United States, 19951998

MMWR
Synopsis for February 4, 2000

Outbreaks of Salmonella Serotype Enteritidis Infection Associated with Eating Raw Shell Eggs United States, 19961998

Although the number of Samonella Enteritidis (SE) outbreaks have declined in recent years, undercooked eggs still remain the primary source of SE infection.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
David Swerdlow, M.D.
CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 6392206
(Alternate: Mary Evans, M.P.H., same phone number)
During the 1980's and 1990's, Salmonella serotype Enteritidis emerged as an important cause of human illness in the United States. Studies have shown that much of this increase is associated with the consumption of raw or undercooked eggs. Although the rates of sporadic illness as well as the number of SE outbreaks have declined in recent years, SE is still an important public health problem. Further reductions in illness can be accomplished by establishing prevention measures such as on-farm control programs, refrigeration during transport and storage, and consumer and food worker education.

 

Prevalence of Selected Risk Factors for Chronic Disease and Injury Among American Indians and Alaska Natives United States, 19951998

Risk factors leading to chronic disease and injury in American Indians and Alaska Natives vary by region of the country and gender.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Clark Denny, Ph.D.
CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion
(770) 4882455
Smoking-related illnesses, diabetes, and motor vehicle injuries are major causes of death among American Indians and Alaska Natives. Results from CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a national telephone survey, show large differences between regions of the country and between men and women for current smoking, awareness of having diabetes, and not always wearing a seatbelt while driving or riding in a car. Smoking among American Indians and Alaska Natives was most common in the Northern Plains (45%) and least common in the Southwest (22%). Awareness of having diabetes was lowest among AI/AN men and women in Alaska. Not wearing a seatbelt was most common in the Northern Plains (54%) and least common on the Pacific Coast (19%). American Indian and Alaska Native men were at higher risk than women for smoking.

 


Media Home | Contact Us

CDC Home | Search | Health Topics A-Z

This page last reviewed Thursday, February 4, 2000
URL:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Office of Communication