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MMWR
Synopsis for November 19, 1999

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. Eastern time on Thursday.

  1. Nonfatal and Fatal Firearm-Related Injuries United States, 19931996
  2. State-Specific Prevalence of Current Cigarette and Cigar Smoking Among Adults United States, 1998
  3. Influenza Activity United States, 19992000 Season

MMWR
Synopsis for November 19, 1999

Nonfatal and Fatal Firearm-Related Injuries United States, 19931996

Progress has been made to reduce national firearm-related death and injury rates.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
J. Lee Annest, Ph.D
CDC, National Center for Injury Prevention & Control
(770) 4884804
For fatal and nonfatal firearm-related injuries, the annual death rate declined 21%, and the annual rate of nonfatal injuries treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments declined about 41%. The decline was substantial and consistent among population subgroups (sex, race/ethnicity, age, and intent of injury). The number of firearm-related deaths declined from a historic high of 39,595 in 1993 to 32,436 in 1997. However, in 1997, firearm-related injury remained the second leading cause of injury-related death in the United States behind motor vehicle traffic-related injury. Despite the significant declines in fatal and nonfatal firearm-related injury rates, an estimated 96,643 U.S. residents (or an average of 265 persons per day) sustained gunshot wounds in 1997. Recent occurrences of violence (school-related and multiple shootings) are reminders that firearm-related injuries remain a serious public health concern.

 

State-Specific Prevalence of Current Cigarette and Cigar Smoking Among Adults United States, 1998

Variations in State rates of cigarette and cigar smoking emphasize the need for reducing tobacco use and improving tobacco prevention and control measures.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Michael Eriksen, Sc.D.
CDC, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion
(770) 4885493
This CDC report presents a wide variation in state-specific cigarette smoking prevalence among U.S. adults; ranging from 14.2% in Utah to 30.8% in Kentucky. The median for current adult cigarette smoking was 22.9% (25.3% for men and 21.0 % for women) for all 50 states and the District of Columbia, remaining relatively unchanged since 1996. The states with the highest adult cigarette smoking prevalence were Kentucky (30.8%), Nevada (30.4%), West Virginia (27.9%), Michigan (27.4%), and South Dakota (27.3%). The lowest adult cigarette smoking prevalence rates were found in Utah (14.2%), Minnesota (18.0%), California (19.2%), New Jersey (19.2%) and Hawaii (19. %). The study also provides first-ever state specific adult cigar smoking data; highest in Nevada (7.4%) and lowest in Arizona (1.4%).

 

Influenza Activity United States, 19992000 Season

Influenza activity is currently at low levels, but sporadic cases have been identified throughout the country.

 
PRESS CONTACT:
Influenza Branch
CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 6393747
Influenza activity was at a low level in the United States during October through early November. However, sporadic flu cases were reported from 30 states, and 4 nursing home outbreaks were reported from three states. Institutional outbreaks can occur year-round, but most often during peak flu season. Institutions should be prepared to quickly detect and control outbreaks to minimize their impact. The predominant viruses have been influenza type A (H3N2), although influenza B viruses have also been detected. These viruses are well-matched to strains in the 1999-2000 vaccine. CDC obtains flu data from the Sentinel Physicians Surveillance Network, state and territorial epidemiologists' reports, 122 Cities Mortality Reporting System, and the World Health Organization and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System collaborating laboratories.

 


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