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  Press Summaries

MMWR
August 27, 1999

MMWR articles are embargoed until 4 p.m. Eastern time on Thursday.


MMWR Synopsis
  1. Health Status of and Intervention for U.S.-Bound Kosovar Refugees Fort Dix, New Jersey, May - July 1999
  2. Progress Toward the Elimination of Tuberculosis United States, 1998
  3. Progress Toward the Global Interruption of Wild Poliovirus Type 2 Transmission, 1999

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MMWR

Synopsis August 27, 1999

Health Status of and Intervention for U.S.-Bound Kosovar Refugees Fort Dix, New Jersey, May - July 1999
The Kosovar refugees, who came to the United States, received preventive health services in addition to the mandatory health assessment.

PRESS CONTACT:
Susan Cookson, M.D.
CDC, National Center for Infectious Diseases
(404) 639-8110
From May 5 through July 16, 1999, U.S.-bound Kosovar refugees were temporarily housed at Fort Dix, New Jersey. Refugees resettling in the United States normally undergo a mandatory health assessment. This group of Kosovar refugees received additional preventive health services and interventions. This included identifying chronic conditions (e.g., hypertension and diabetes) requiring medication, vaccinations, pregnancy testing and referral to prenatal care services, and providing acute dental and mental health services. Medical records from Fort Dix were transmitted to the resettlement health providers. These conditions, normally not identified, aid in the transition of refugees to their new homes. This health information and data collection and dissemination should be considered basic components of the refugee admission and resettlement process.

  Progress Toward the Elimination of Tuberculosis United States, 1998
1998 TB declines indicate U.S. remaining track, but challenges still exist.
PRESS CONTACT:
Office of Communications
CDC, National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention
(404) 639-8895
In 1998, there were 18,361 cases of active tuberculosis (TB) disease reported in the United States; declining 8 percent from 19,851 cases in 1997. This overall decline for the sixth straight year provides continued evidence that the United States has recovered from the resurgence of TB, which began in the 1980's. However, the trends in TB point to a number of remaining challenges for the next era of TB elimination. Trends of concern include the impact of the global TB epidemic in the United States with an increasing proportion of foreign-born cases from 27% in 1992 to 42% in 1998. Multi-drug resistant TB remains a concern with 45 states reporting cases between 1993 and 1998. Effectively addressing these concerns will require specific approaches for identifying and treating those populations at greatest risk. TB elimination will require a sustained U.S. commitment and increased global collaboration.

  Progress Toward the Global Interruption of Wild Poliovirus Type 2 Transmission, 1999
Wild poliovirus is on the threshold of eradication; this achievement will be a significant milestone in the global initiative.
PRESS CONTACT:
Victor Caceres, M.D., M.P.H.
CDC, National Immunization Program
(404) 639-8252
Since 1988, when the World Health Assembly resolved to eradicate polio by 2000, substantial progress has been made toward attaining this goal: the Americas, the Pacific Rim, Europe, and Central Asia are polio-free. Among the three poliovirus serotypes, the greatest gains have been achieved against wild poliovirus type 2. As of 1999, the only known reservoir for wild poliovirus type 2 is the Ganges valley of India, though it is likely there are isolated areas of circulation in Africa. In addition to the near elimination of wild poliovirus type 2, the genetic diversity of remaining genotypes (a group of polioviruses within serotypes with genetic similarity) has been significantly reduced globally as chains of transmission are broken and endemic reservoirs become polio-free. Further intensification of vaccination and surveillance activities will be needed to meet the year 2000 goal for the eradication of all wild poliovirus serotypes.

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