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Preview-2013

13 in 2013: CDC Looks Ahead

Publishing Date: January 17, 2013

Thomas R. Frieden, MD, MPH, looking ahead

As America’s health protection agency, CDC works 24/7 saving lives, protecting people from health threats, and saving money through prevention. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are chronic or acute, curable or preventable, human error or deliberate attack, CDC is there for you.

Here’s a glance of 13 public health topics to look for in 2013:

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

Let’s Stop HIV Together

In the fight against HIV, stigma and complacency are among our most insidious opponents. To combat two major obstacles to HIV prevention—stigma associated with the infection and complacency about the epidemic— CDC launched Let’s Stop HIV Together, a national communication campaign that gives voice to the estimated 1.1 million Americans living with HIV, and to their loved ones. The campaign, which features people living with HIV standing with their friends and family and calling on all Americans to join the fight against the disease, will reach millions of Americans through print, online and outdoor advertisements and through social media, including Facebook and Twitter.

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Stigma remains a major barrier to HIV testing, condom use and other prevention strategies. It also discourages those living with HIV from seeking the care and treatment they need to stay healthy and avoid transmitting HIV to others. If we can overcome stigma and misperceptions about HIV, we can lift these barriers and save lives.

Jonathan Mermin, MD - Director of CDC’s Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention

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Healthcare-Associated Infections

Protecting Patients, Saving Lives

More than 1 million Americans get a healthcare-associated infection during the course of their medical care, which accounts for billions of dollars in excess healthcare costs. CDC is working toward the elimination of healthcare-associated infections across all settings. CDC continues to target untreatable drug resistant infections that threaten patient safety and, in early 2013, will be releasing updated national and state numbers on healthcare-associated infections prevention in U.S. hospitals.

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Graphics/Images

CDC scientist Alicia Shams

CDC scientist Alicia Shams demonstrating K. pneumoniae growth on a MacConkey agar plate.

CDC scientist Alicia Shams

A growing number of healthcare-associated infections are caused by bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics.

Videos

Outbreaks of Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae
Arjun Srinivasan, MD

Author: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Date: 5/2/2012
Outbreaks of Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae

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Today, complex medical care is often provided outside of hospitals. Patients deserve to be safe regardless of where they receive care. We want to raise the national bar of what is acceptable healthcare in the United States.

Michael Bell, MD - Deputy Director, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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CDC Vital Signs

Public Health Calls to Action

Released on the first Tuesday of every month, CDC Vital Signs presents recent data and calls to action for important public health issues. CDC believes that by focusing on a single topic using multiple media devices, the nations might better identify these health problems in their area and work towards their improvement. In 2013, Vital Signs will be covering important health issues that are public health priorities with large-scale impact on health and with known, effective strategies to address them.  

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Graphics/Images

Woman holding he head with a drink in her hand

Intoxicated woman holding her head with a drink in hand.

 

CDC scientist Alicia Shams

Nearly 14 million US women binge drink about three times a month.

Videos

Binge Drinking
Binge Drinking

Author: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP)
Date: 04/13/2010
Binge Drinking

Podcasts

  • January 2013 Vital Signs Podcast – Binge Drinking Among Women and Girls
    English | Spanish

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We use standard scientific methodology to analyze disease and what can be done about it. For the call to action, we use science-based recommendations for what works. We are speaking not only to state and local health departments, but directly to the public and media, asking them to look and see if they have done what they can to advance their own health in these important specific areas. And we are also addressing practitioners who see these people in their offices to help make sure that they are getting the preventive care that they need.

Richard Schieber, MD, MPH - Coordinator of Vital Signs, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Public Health Grand Rounds

Exploring Public Health Issues

Created to foster discussion on major public health issues, CDC’s Public Health Grand Rounds continues to close the gap between science and communication. Each monthly webcast session focuses on key challenges related to a specific health topic, and explores cutting-edge scientific evidence and potential impact of different interventions. CDC’s 2013 Public Health Grand Rounds will ignite stimulating discussions on topics including venous thromboembolism (VTE), human papillomavirus (HPV), teen pregnancy, and immunization by highlighting how CDC and its partners are already addressing these challenges and discuss the recommendations for future research and practice.

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Public Health Grand Rounds

Public Health Grand Rounds.

 

Speakers of the December 2013 Public Health Grand Rounds

Speakers of the December 2013 Public Health Grand Rounds, “Where in health is disability? Public health practices to include people with disabilities”. From left to right, Georges Benjamin, MD, FACP, FNAPA, FACEP (E), Hon FRSPH, Catherine Leigh Graham, MEBME, Jennifer Hootman, PhD, ATC, FACSM, FNATA, Monika Mitra, PhD, and Gloria Krahn, PhD, MPH. Photo Credit: Mandie Mills.

 

Videos

Where in health is disability? Public health practices to include people with disabilities
Where in health is disability? Public health practices to include people with disabilities

Author: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Date: 12/19/2012
Where in health is disability? Public health practices to include people with disabilities

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CDC Grand Rounds continues to build a strong following with scientists, clinicians and college students in medicine, nursing and public health. Our live webcasts have larger audiences each month, and we've learned that colleges across the country are using our archived programs in their classrooms. This year we will continue to grow our social media presence with live Tweeting during each event.

Susan K. Laird, MSN, RN - Director, Division of News and Electronic Media, Communications Manager for CDC Public Health Grand Rounds

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Million Hearts™

Preventing Heart Attacks and Strokes

Nearly 800,000 people die in the United States each year from cardiovascular disease, accounting for 1 in 3 deaths and more than $300 billion in direct medical costs and lost productivity. CDC is working with other Million Hearts™ public and private partners to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017. CDC continues to focus on helping Americans improve their heart health by encouraging greater collaboration between clinical practice and public health and in early 2013 will support the release of new Spanish-language materials for the public and guidance for public health practitioners on implementing self-measured blood pressure monitoring to improve high blood pressure control.

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Just 3% of U.S. adults report having ideal heart health. The good news is that everyone can make progress and be healthier. Research shows that when doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and patients work as a team, they can improve heart health. They use electronic health records to improve care and track progress. Every member of the health care team is on alert to identify patients with high blood pressure or cholesterol and provide them with support, including how to take their medicines for greatest effect. Consumers are full partners in taking action to improve their ABCS and sustain their heart health by eating a healthy diet low in sodium and trans fat, maintaining a healthy weight, and being physically active.

Janet Wright, MD, FACC - Executive Director of Million Hearts™

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TIPS from FORMER Smokers

Helping Smokers Quit

This year CDC is planning to release national results from the groundbreaking Tips From Former Smokers’ national ad campaign launched in 2012. Building on the known successes of the TIPS campaign, new advertisements will be launched in 2013. Stay tuned for details.

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Graphics/Images

Cigarettes

Smoking harms nearly every organ of the body, causing many diseases and affecting the health of smokers in general, as well as those inhaling “second hand” smoke. Quitting smoking has immediate as well as long-term benefits for you and your loved ones. Photo credit: Debora Cartagena, CDC

 

: Commit to Quit Smoking in 2013

Stop smoking campaign graphic: Commit to Quit Smoking in 2013.

Videos

Tips from Former Smokers
Tips from Former Smokers

Author: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Date: 05/15/2012
CDC: Tips from Former Smokers - Buerger's Disease Ad

2012 TIPs Campaign Videos

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The success we’ve seen with last year’s TIPS From Former Smokers ads shows just how effective media campaigns can be in motivating smokers to quit for good. This year’s new ads will present more stories told by a new group of national heroes who are suffering from the devastating health consequences of smoking. These new TIPS ads—like their predecessors—will help smokers successfully quit and save lives.

Tim McAfee, MD, MPH - Director of CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health

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Newborn Screening

Saving Babies' Lives

Nearly 6,000 babies born in the United States with severe disorders, most of which are treatable, are identified using newborn screening programs each year. CDC’s Division of Laboratory Sciences in the National Center for Environmental Health plays an important role in newborn screening by offering the Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program (NSQAP) to local, state, and international laboratories and assuring newborn screening test results are as accurate as possible. Throughout 2013, CDC will be working with the Association of Public Health Laboratories to promote the benefits of newborn screening and recognize the 50th year of newborn screening in the United States.

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Graphics/Images

Cigarettes

CDC’s Research Chemist Joanne Mei analyzing blood spots in the Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program.

 

TIPS Campaign graphic

Newborn Screening Quality Assurance infographic.

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It’s all about the babies, and protecting the babies from the effects of a detectable condition also helps families. It takes considerable effort for doctors to diagnose serious disorders--usually after babies suffer a health crisis and families endure extended and costly diagnostic procedures. Newborn screening detects these serious disorders so they can be treated immediately. Newborn screening gives babies the best chance to lead healthy lives.

Carla Cuthbert - Branch Chief of the Newborn Screening and Molecular Biology Branch in CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health

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Food Safety

Safer Food From Finding and Stopping Outbreaks

CDC works 24/7 to track the germs, foods, places, and behaviors that make people sick. In 2013, new CDC data gleaned from outbreaks will better identify where, and why, food becomes contaminated.  Fifteen states partner with CDC food safety programs to get ahead of stubborn foodborne outbreaks: FoodCORE conducts more rapid DNA fingerprinting to uncover outbreaks, and together with  FoodNet will pilot advanced technology for laboratorians, epidemiologists, and federal public health regulatory agencies to share outbreak information. Food Safety Integrated Centers of Excellence will provide regional response and resources.

Related Links

Graphics/Images

Food Safety Progress Report

Food Safety Progress Report.

Photo: CDC PulseNet scientist conducts DNA  fingerprinting to uncover foodborne outbreaks

CDC PulseNet scientist conducts DNA fingerprinting to uncover foodborne outbreaks.

Videos

Food poisoning fix?
Thomas R. Frieden, MD, MPH

Author: CBS News
Date: 12/13/2012
Food poisoning fix?

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People who want to reduce their risk of foodborne illness should assume raw chicken and other meat carry bacteria that can cause illness and should not allow them to contaminate surfaces and other foods, such as produce. While it's important to wash produce thoroughly, consumers should never wash meat and poultry. They should also cook chicken, other meats, meat, poultry, and eggs thoroughly well, avoid consuming unpasteurized milk and juice as well as and unpasteurized soft cheese, and make sure shellfish are cooked or treated for safety before eating.

Robert Tauxe, MD, MPH - Deputy Director, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Infectious Zoonotic Diseases

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Heads-Up Program

Heads-Up to Parents

From sports fields to schools across the country, CDC's Heads Up program works to get information on how to spot and respond to concussions to every coach, teacher and athlete. Already CDC has disseminated over 6 million copies of Heads Up materials and has trained more than 800,000 coaches through its Heads Up online concussion trainings. In 2013, CDC will launch the Heads Up to Parents initiative, with tools designed to help parents keep kids safe from concussion on and off the sports field.

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Graphics/Images

Woman on a bike fastening a helmet on a child

Woman on a bike fastening a helmet on a child.

What to do if yor think your child has a brain injury

What to do if yor think your child has a brain injury: Assess the situation, Be Alert for brain injury signs and symptoms, Contact a healthcare professional.

Videos

Kurt Warner Heads Up PSA
Kurt Warner Heads Up PSA

Author: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Date: 07/18/2012
Kurt Warner Heads Up PSA

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Concussions can have a serious effect on a young, developing brain. When parents know how to spot and respond to concussions, they can help keep kids safe. Through CDC’s Heads Up program, we are helping parents ‘Be Heads Up’ about concussions, whether they are watching their child on the playground, at sports practice, or at home.

Linda C. Degutis, Dr PH, MSN, - Director of CDC's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control

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Children’s Mental Health

CDC Brings a Focus to Children's Mental Health

Approximately 1 in 5 children in the United States this year will experience a mental, emotional, or behavioral disorder (MEB) with an overall economic impact of $247 billion annually.  MEB disorders are associated with poor school and health outcomes, and greater demands on the health, education, juvenile justice, and welfare systems.  An MMWR titled “Children's mental health: Surveillance of mental disorders among children in the United States” is planned for 2013 that will describe current federal efforts to track children’s mental disorders, the prevalence of these disorders, identify gaps, and inform a public health approach to prevent MEB disorders and promote mental health in children.  

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Picture of kids in a row

Picture of kids in a row.

Three of every thousand children have Tourette syndrome

A CDC study has found that three of every thousand children six through seventeen years old have been diagnosed with Tourette syndrome.

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Effective public health strategies - put into place early - can reduce the impact or prevent the on-set of mental, emotional, or behavioral disorders. Early diagnosis and appropriate services for the child and his or her family can make an enormous difference in the welfare of our children.

Coleen A. Boyle, PhD MS hyg - Director of CDC’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities

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Clinical Preventive Services for Children and Adolescents

Services That Improve the Health of Children and Save Lives

Screening infants for developmental delays, vision screening beginning in preschool years, blood pressure screening in school age children, tobacco use counseling in adolescents – all can improve the health of children and adolescents and save their lives. Passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 as amended by the Healthcare and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, offers new opportunities to promote and use these kinds of clinical preventive services. This year, CDC will report on the potential benefits of selected services and how we can work together to improve use.

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Clinical preventive services for children and adolescents can improve their development and quality of life, prevent diseases, and save lives. This report provides a snapshot of preventive services for U.S. children and adolescents before 2010. As we look to the future, we can track how our nation’s health is progressing through better prevention in health care.

Thomas R. Frieden, MD, MPH - Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Preventing Parasitic Diseases

Integrating Technology and Health

One billion people are disabled, killed, or disfigured by parasitic diseases worldwide and millions in the United States are infected. To prevent spread of these infectious diseases and assist those afflicted, CDC is launching a novel diagnostic service that uses high-quality imaging technology, enabling CDC scientists to analyze images remotely of a possible parasite discovered during testing or a medical procedure in real-time, 24/7, such as organ transplants. This simultaneous examination will improve diagnosis and treatment for 15,000+ cases CDC assists with a year, as well as enhance training for laboratory scientists worldwide, including state, territory, and local health departments.

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Graphics/Images

LAb worher with a hook worm in his hands

Henry Bishop, CDC microbiologist, with roundworms (Ascaris lumbricoides) from a little boy.
Photo credit: James Gathany

 

encapsulated Trichinella worm

Microscopic image of an encapsulated Trichinella worm. People are infected by the microscopic parasite by eating raw or undercooked meat.

Videos

Dangerous Creatures – A Visit To The CDC Insectary
Dangerous Creatures – A Visit To The CDC Insectary

Author: Center for Global Health
Date: 10/29/2012
Dangerous Creatures – A Visit To The CDC Insectary

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Real-time telediagnostic imaging will bring our diagnostic assistance to the next level. We are thrilled to share our expertise with laboratory scientists interactively and thus protect people from parasitic diseases more effectively.

CAPT Monica Parise, MD - Parasitic Diseases Branch Chief, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health

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Global Efforts to Prevent Violence Against Children

Protecting Childhood Around the World

More than 1 billion children – half of all children in the world -- are victims of violence each and every year.  These children are at greater risk for common and destructive, yet entirely preventable consequences, including HIV, chronic diseases, crime and drug abuse, as well as serious mental health problems. In 2013, CDC will contribute to the US Government Action Plan on Children in Adversity, recently launched at the White House, by expanding our work with global partners to measure the magnitude and impact of violence against children, and to use those measurements to propel effective and sustainable action.

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TIPS Campaign graphic

Sexual violence against girls is a global human rights injustice of vast proportions with severe health and social consequences. Photo Credit: Nadia Todres

: Commit to Quit Smoking in 2013

Together for girls: We can end sexual violence.

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CDC is committed to working alongside other United States government agencies and an array of global partners to help assure that children not only survive, but also thrive, growing up in strong families, with safe, stable and nurturing relationships.

Thomas R. Frieden, MD, MPH - Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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