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New CDC Diabetes Report

Continued Increase in Rates of Diabetes and Prediabetes

The number of cases of diabetes and prediabetes among Americans of all ages and ethnicities continues to increase, according to the National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2014 (based on health data from 2012), released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. People with diabetes are at increased risk of serious health complications including blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation of toes, feet or legs, and premature death. Prevention efforts nationwide are crucial to combat serious health risks.

  • Diabetes: Twenty-nine million people in the U.S. have diabetes aged 20 years or older (12.3% of the adult population), and 1 in 4 do not know it. This number has increased from 26 million in 2010. In 2012 alone, 1.7 million people aged 20 years or older were newly diagnosed with diabetes and 208,000 people younger than 20 years have diabetes (type 1 or type 2).
  • Prediabetes: Eighty-six million people—more than 1 out of 3 people—aged 20 years and older have prediabetes. The percentage of U.S. adults with prediabetes is similar for non-Hispanic whites (35%), non-Hispanic blacks (39%), and Hispanics (38%). Without weight loss and moderate physical activity, 15-30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years.
  • Cost: Diabetes and its related complications account for $245 billion in total medical costs and lost work and wages. This figure is up from $174 billion in 2010. People with diabetes are at increased risk of serious health complications including blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation of toes, feet or legs, and premature death. Prevention efforts nationwide are crucial to combat serious health risks.

Individuals can learn more about diabetes and prediabetes by talking to a healthcare provider about the risk to them and their families. Learn more about diabetes and CDC’s evidence-based and cost-effective interventions through our National Diabetes Prevention Program.

Contact Information

CDC Media Relations
(404) 639-3286
media@cdc.gov

Spokespersons

Ann Albright, PhD, RD

“These new numbers are alarming and underscore the need for an increased focus on reducing the burden of diabetes in our country. Diabetes is costly in both human and economic terms. It’s urgent that we take swift action to effectively treat and prevent this serious disease."

“Now is the time to take action. If these numbers continue to rise, 1 in 5 people could have diabetes by the year 2025, and it could be 1 in 3 people by the year 2050. We simply can’t sustain this trajectory – the implications are far too great – for our families, our healthcare system, our workforce, our nation."

“We know today that adopting a healthier lifestyle is the most effective way to prevent type 2 diabetes and improve health for people already diagnosed with diabetes. It’s critical that people learn ways to change their own health behaviors (through programs like CDC’s National Diabetes Prevention Program), and that they have the necessary support and encouragement from the people and environment around them."

“The sooner people find out they have prediabetes and take action, the better their chances of preventing type 2 diabetes."

Ann Albright, PhD, RD - Director, Division of Diabetes Translation, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Edward Gregg, PhD

“If we want to reduce the overall burden of diabetes in our nation, we have to focus on preventing diabetes in the first place."

“The number of people affected by diabetes and prediabetes has increased across all age groups and ethnicities. Diabetes is everyone’s disease."

Edward Gregg, PhD - Chief of the Epidemiology and Statistics Branch, Division of Diabetes Translation, National Center for Chronic DiseasePrevention and Health Promotion

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