Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home
Share
Compartir

Injury Center Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs)

CE04-015 - Effective Strategies to Reduce Motor Vehicle Injuries Among American Indians/Alaska Natives

Initial Fiscal Year: 2004
Program: DUIP
FOA Number: CE04-015
FOA Title: Effective Strategies to Reduce Motor Vehicle Injuries Among American Indians/Alaska Natives

Injury Center Success Story

photo: teenage boy driving car with father in passenger seat

Ho-Chunk Nation Launches Road Safety Program

Ho-Chunk Division of Health, Wisconsin

"This program highlights people and programs who buckle up. I like that. Motor vehicle crashes are the number one killer of children and adolescents. I love that this life-saving message is being spread to the whole community, raising awareness, and changing behaviors."
- Amy J. DeLong, MD, MPH, Family Medicine, Adolescent Health

Ho-Chunk Nation Launches Road Safety Program [PDF 748 KB]

Native American Road
Safety >>

More Success Stories >>

Purpose

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the availability of fiscal year (FY) 2004 funds for a cooperative agreement program to develop, implement, and evaluate community-based interventions with demonstrated effectiveness to reduce motor vehicle-related injuries among American Indians and Alaska Natives (also referred to as Native Americans). This program addresses the “Healthy People 2010” focus area of Injury and Violence Prevention.

The purpose of the program is to design/tailor, implement, and evaluate Native American community-based interventions with demonstrated effectiveness for preventing motor vehicle injuries within the following areas: (1) strategies to reduce alcohol-impaired driving among high risk groups; (2) strategies to increase safety belt use among low-use groups; and (3) strategies to increase the use of child safety seats and booster seats among low use groups. (see Attachment 1 for additional background)

In addition, the program should gather information on the process of implementing and evaluating these strategies, including any challenges and barriers for tribes. An overriding intent of this funding is to assist tribes in designing/tailoring (as well as implementing and evaluating) these evidence-based effective strategies in programs, which take into consideration the unique culture of American Indians and Alaska Natives.
Note: Attachments are posted with the Program Announcement at the CDC web site, Internet address: http://www.cdc.gov. Click on “Funding,” then “Grants and Cooperative Agreements”.

This project will fund the formation of coalitions of tribal health departments, tribal injury prevention programs, law enforcement, and tribal transportation and traffic safety agencies. These coalitions will work with other community groups, organizations, state agencies, and the Indian Health Service (IHS) to design/tailor, implement, and evaluate at least two selected interventions. Collaborations may include schools, youth organizations, safety advocates, local media, health care providers, academic researchers, IHS staff, state traffic safety agencies and social service agencies, among others.

Measurable outcomes of the program will be in alignment with one or more of the following performance goals for the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC): (1) increase the capacity of injury prevention and control programs to address the prevention of injuries and violence; and (2) monitor and detect fatal and non-fatal injuries. In addition applicants should address the following research priorities in transportation safety from the NCIPC Research Agenda: (1) evaluate strategies to implement known, effective interventions to reduce alcohol-impaired driving and test the effectiveness of new, innovative strategies; (2) develop and evaluate interventions that address the proper and consistent use of measures to protect child occupants in motor vehicles; and (3) develop and evaluate interventions to increase the use of occupant protection devices, such as seat belts, in high-risk and hard-to-reach populations.

The CDC report, “Motor-Vehicle Occupant Injury: Strategies for increasing use of child safety seats, increasing use of safety belts, and reducing alcohol-impaired driving: a report on recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services,” may be useful in understanding these effective strategies and in preparing applications. The report can be found on the CDC website at:
www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/rr/5007 [PDF 139 KB].

Awarded Projects

Project Title: Ho-Chunk Motor Vehicle Injury Prevention Program
Grant Number: 5 U17 CE524094-04
Project Period: 9/1/2004 - 8/31/2009

Project Title: The Design, Implementation & Eval of Effective Strategies to Reduce MV Injry Among Members to Reduce
Grant Number: 5 U17 CE924091-04
Project Period: 9/1/2004 - 8/31/2009

Project Title: Effective Strategies to Reduce MV Injuries Among Thono O'odham Nation in Plma, Pinal & Mariciopa Co
Grant Number: 5 U17 CE924092-04
Project Period: 9/1/2004 - 8/31/2009

Project Title: San Carlos IP Project to Reduce MV Related Injuries
Grant Number: 5 U17 CE924093-04
Project Period: 9/1/2004 - 8/31/2009


 

 
Contact Us:
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC)
    4770 Buford Hwy, NE
    MS F-63
    Atlanta, GA 30341-3717
  • 800-CDC-INFO
    (800-232-4636)
    TTY: (888) 232-6348
  • Contact CDC–INFO
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO
A-Z Index
  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #