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Replicating Effective Programs Plus

Questions and Answers

History of REP

What is REP?

Started in 1996, Replicating Effective Programs (REP) is a CDC project that supports the translation of evidence-based HIV prevention interventions into everyday practice, by working with the original researchers in developing a user-friendly package of materials designed for prevention providers. Fact sheets on each REP-packaged intervention can be found here.

How often are new intervention packages added to the REP collection?

CDC’s goal is to add new intervention packages to the REP collection every year, but this is dependent of the availability of federal funds and national prevention priorities of the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.

What activities do not pertain to REP?

REP is not …

REP Process

What criteria must interventions meet to be considered for the REP collection?

In order to consider packaging, interventions should be identified by the Prevention Research Synthesis (PRS) project as best-and good-evidence of efficacy. These criteria can be found on the PRS website.

What are the procedures for adding intervention packages to the REP collection?

Each year or two CDC announces a request for applications to translate the science-based protocols of proven interventions. Researchers with effective interventions apply for competitive funding to translate their research protocols into intervention packages for use by prevention providers. The highest scoring applicants are selected. Various letters of support may need to accompany applications. For example, if the research was part of a multisite project with a common protocol, applicants need letters from all of the original developers of the intervention indicating their commitment to participate in developing the intervention materials and specifying the nature of their participation. Of particular importance is narrative that discusses generalizing the intervention to other target populations. If the applicant is not the intervention's original researcher, the applicant also needs letters of permission from the intervention's originator(s) to develop and market materials for the proposed intervention package.

CDC staff then work with the funded researchers to develop technical assistance guides, training materials, posters, and any other materials necessary to implement the intervention, all of which become part of the intervention package. Once the intervention packages have been developed, CDC posts fact sheets on the REP+ web site and alerts REP+ listserv subscribers to the availability of the added packages.

What products are prepared with a REP-packaged intervention?

REP will develop all of the materials that a prevention provider will need to conduct the intervention:

If CDC’s Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions (DEBI) project disseminates a REP-packaged intervention, DEBI may add enhancements to the packages, such as logic models and evaluation guides. The DEBI project is a national-level strategy to provide high-quality training and ongoing technical assistance for selected evidence-based HIV/STD prevention interventions, including those packaged by REP, to state and community HIV/STD program staff.

What is the process for packaging an intervention for the REP Project?

Interventions are typically packaged under a 2-year cooperative agreement. A cooperative agreement differs from a grant in that CDC staff are substantially involved in the program activities, above and beyond routine grant monitoring. For example, CDC staff review and approve the packages' contents. See FOA General Questions page for more details on cooperative agreements. Typically, in the first year of the cooperative agreement, the grantee (1) forms an advisory committee of HIV prevention providers, community members, and members of the target population; (2) translates the science-based protocol into everyday language; (3) develops package contents and format with advisory committee; (4) recruits at least two HIV prevention agencies as case study agencies that will field test the package during the second year; (5) develops and pilot test a training curricula for agency staff; and (6) develops a process evaluation plan.

In the second year of the cooperative agreement, grantee (1) orients the case study agencies to the intervention; (2) collaboratively tailor and adapt the intervention; (3) trains agency staff how to deliver the intervention and teach them the technical skills needed for intervention delivery; (4) provides technical assistance on implementation and problem-solving; (5) evaluates the process of implementation and debrief the agency staff; (6) develops technical assistance guidance manuals on the basis of the researcher’s and agencies’ experience; (7) refines the intervention package and training curricula based on agency input; and (8) produces refined versions of all materials for dissemination.

What materials make up an intervention package?

A REP intervention package consists of an implementation manual, a facilitator’s guide, promotional or marketing material, handouts, posters, brochures, and any other nonconsumable items needed to implement the intervention.

The implementation manual has several sections, beginning with a brief description of the intervention and the science behind it. A section on getting started steps covers the intervention’s core elements related to preparation, time line of necessary preparation steps, list of collaborators, material resources, facilities, staff, recruitment of participants, quality assurance plan, and cost categories for conducting the intervention. A section on implementation steps covers the intervention’s core elements related to implementation, protocols and examples for implementing the intervention and ensuring quality and consistency, identification of barriers to implementation, and advice on how these barriers may be overcome. A section on steps to keep the intervention going covers the intervention’s core elements related to maintenance and deals with issues of staff turnover and retraining. Last, an monitoring and evaluation section contains process and outcome monitoring methods and sample instruments.

In addition, REP packages usually have a starter kit, which contains information on intervention logistics, intervention costs, and an intervention protocol checklist for program administrators.

What are an intervention's core elements?

Core elements serve as parameters for the parts of an intervention that should not be changed, benchmarks for intervention fidelity, and references for quality assurance of intervention implementation. Researchers articulated what defines their intervention—those fundamental components that, if changed, would transform their intervention into something other than what they had deemed to be effective.

Core elements are critical features of an intervention’s intent and design. They are thought to be responsible for an intervention’s efficacy and put an intervention’s underlying theoretical constructs into operation. Core elements can be identified by using one or all of the following three methods: (1) practical application of the intervention’s underlying theory, (2) experience using the intervention, and (3) if available, a component analysis of procedures.

The number of core elements in an intervention can vary from as few as three to as many as nine. However, the median number of core elements for the current REP packages is five. The nature of core elements in interventions can vary by concepts or underlying principles, the specific set and/or sequence of methods, the intended outcomes, the specific set of components and their venues, the number and type of persons delivering the intervention, and restrictions to certain settings or populations.

Core elements should be categorized and written guided by 3 domains:

Do all prevention programs using a REP package need to adhere to CDC's HIV Content Guidelines?

The HIV Content Guidelines ensure that HIV prevention materials contain messages on ways by which individuals can protect themselves from acquiring the virus or reduce their risk of acquiring or spreading the virus. The Guidelines provide a framework for developing and using educational materials and require that Program Review Panels (PRPs) consider the appropriateness of messages designed for various groups. According to the Guidelines, the PRPs must be composed of at least 5 members, include at least one employee of the state or local health department, and represent a reasonable cross-section of the general population.

Investigators receiving CDC funds for HIV intervention research are required to identify a local PRP in their jurisdiction to review and approve any materials used with the study participants. Agencies implementing a CDC-funded program should have their local PRP review and approve all materials that will be viewed by or given to persons receiving the intervention..

To view the Guidelines, go to

Do you have an intervention for my population?

REP packages behavioral and social interventions for HIV prevention that have been proven to work across a wide variety of different populations & settings. REP does not package policy or structural interventions, such as needle exchange programs. You may search for REP-packaged HIV prevention interventions with demonstrated evidence of effectiveness by visiting our REP Packages page.

Do you plan to package non-US interventions?

At this time, REP does not have plans to package non-US interventions.

Dissemination

How are REP-packaged interventions disseminated?

Most REP-packaged interventions are or will be disseminated through the CDC's Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions (DEBI) project. The DEBI project is a national-level effort to provide high-quality training and ongoing technical assistance for selected evidence-based HIV/STD prevention interventions, including those packaged by REP, to state and community HIV/STD program staff. For interventions currently disseminated by CDC’s Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions (DEBI) project, a training calendar with dates, times, and locations of training courses, along with information on signing up for a specific training, is available at The DEBI Project web site. REP-packaged interventions not currently disseminated by DEBI may be available through STD/HIV Prevention Training Centers or directly from the researcher. This information would be provided on the REP intervention fact sheet.

The following REP packages are no longer available:

Where can I find a list of dates, times, and locations of training courses?

For interventions currently disseminated by CDC’s Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions (DEBI) project, a training calendar with dates, times, and locations of training courses, along with information on signing up for a specific training, is available at The DEBI Project Website.

How do I sign up for training?

You can register for training courses at The DEBI Project Website for interventions currently disseminated by CDC’s Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions (DEBI) project. For other REP-packaged interventions not currently being disseminated by DEBI, you can contact the intervention’s researchers to see if they are offering any trainings.

How do I order REP intervention packages?

For interventions currently disseminated by CDC’s Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions (DEBI) project, the packages are available with training and technical assistance on how to implement the intervention. To sign up for a DEBI training course, please visit The DEBI Project Website. For other REP-packaged interventions not currently being disseminated by DEBI, you can contact the intervention’s researcher or other contact person as listed on the intervention fact sheet.

How do I get materials to preview without going to a training course?

Fact sheets are available on each intervention at our REP Packages page. For each intervention currently disseminated by CDC’s Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions (DEBI) project, agency materials to help on an intervention and prepare for future implementation are available on The DEBI Project Website.

Other

How do I get funding to implement these interventions?

CDC’s Prevention Programs Branch has competitive funding for community-based organizations (CBOs) and health departments conducting HIV prevention interventions. Funding Announcement Opportunities can be found on www.grants.gov. Also, check your state’s Department of Public Health, HIV/AIDS Division. Departments of Public Health receive money from CDC to fund interventions in their respective states. Philanthropic organizations are another avenue to obtain funding.

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