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Capacity Building Assistance (CBA) for High-Impact HIV Prevention Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) PS14-1403

Frequently Asked Questions (Revised 09/05/13)

General

What is the purpose of PS14-1403?

The purpose of PS14-1403 is to strengthen the capacity of the HIV prevention workforce to optimally plan, implement, and sustain high-impact HIV prevention interventions and strategies in health departments, community-based organizations (CBOs), and healthcare organizations to reduce HIV infections and HIV-related morbidity, mortality, and health disparities across the United States and its territories.

What is capacity building assistance (CBA)?

CBA is the delivery of free (not for fee) state-of-the-science: a) information collection, monitoring, synthesis, packaging, and dissemination; b) training for skills development, and c) technical assistance including consultations, services, and facilitation of peer-to-peer mentoring to address a selected funding category and its related program components. CBA services do not include the direct delivery of HIV prevention services.

What are the expected program outcomes for PS14-1403?

Addressing the following outcomes among its target populations (i.e., health departments, CBOs, and healthcare organizations):

What is the overall scope of work under PS14-1403?

Awardees will a) constitute a national CBA Provider Network (CPN); b) implement all general program requirements; and c) nationally deliver free (not for fee), high-quality CBA services to address a selected funding category and its related program components. The following table summarizes the overall scope of work under PS14-1403. See FAQs section “Application” for additional information about program requirements, funding categories, and program components.General Program Requirements

Why does PS14-1403 differ from previous FOAs to provide CBA services?

In FY 2014, CDC will institute Community High-Impact Prevention (CHIP), a new initiative to shift programmatic efforts of capacity building assistance to further maximize HIV prevention effect and optimize use of resources. Consolidating CBA programs previously funded under FOAs PS09-906 and PS11-1103 HIV Parts I and II,PS14-1403 will support a streamlined program that fully reflects CDC’s new direction for providing high-quality CBA services. CDC considered current HIV-related epidemiological data, the latest and most advanced scientific knowledge and development for high-impact HIV prevention (HIP), and our subsequent HIV prevention imperatives. To further inform development of this new program, CDC conducted a series of partner engagement sessions with representatives from capacity building and community-based organizations (CBOs), Prevention Training Centers (PTCs), health departments, healthcare organizations, and other stakeholders to obtain their feedback and recommendations. Incorporating critical elements from all of these sources, PS14-1403 is a responsive evolution in the conceptualization and operationalization of a national CBA program for HIP.

What are CDC’s HIV prevention imperatives influencing PS14-1403?

Dynamic scientific, technological, economic, political, and social factors continually re-shape the practice of HIV prevention, thereby necessitating parallel shifts in the nature and capacity building needs of the HIV prevention workforce. CDC’s HIV prevention imperatives include, but are not limited to, the following:

What are the key dates regarding PS14-1403?

What technical assistance will be available for applicants to PS14-1403?

During the 60-day application phase (August 2, 2013 – October 2, 2013), applicants will have access to the following technical assistance:

*To obtain webcast slides and/or recordings of the conference calls, please submit your request to HIPTA@CDC.GOV.

Eligibility

Which organizations are eligible to apply for funding under PS14-1403?

Organizations that meet any of the following criteria:

Are state or local health departments eligible to apply for funding under PS14-1403?

Yes. Awardees will be expected to implement a work plan with a national geographic scope.

Are there any other special eligibility requirements?

Applicants are required to provide evidence of the ability to implement a national program. Articles of incorporation, board resolution, by-laws, and other forms of written evidence are acceptable. Documents must be submitted with the application by uploading this documentation in www.grants.gov under "Other Attachment Forms." Each document should be labeled "Proof of Ability for National Program".

Below is a list of other required attachments for applicants to upload as part of their www.grants.gov application as pdf documents. Applicants are not allowed to include other attachments. Applicants may include web links in attachments.

If the required documents listed in this section are not submitted with the application in www.grants.gov under "Other Attachment Forms" the application will be considered non-responsive and will not be entered into the review process.

If a funding amount greater than the ceiling of the award range is requested, the application will be considered non-responsive and will not be entered into the review process.

Note: Title 2 of the United States Code Section 1611 states that an organization described in Section 501(c)(4) of the Internal Revenue Code that engages in lobbying activities is not eligible to receive Federal funds constituting a grant, loan, or an award.

If an applicant requests a funding amount greater than the ceiling of the award range listed in PS14-1403, the application will be considered non-responsive and will not be entered into the review process. The applicant will be notified that the application did not meet the eligibility requirements.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to carefully review the entirety of PS14-1403 and adhere to all instructions/requirements pertaining to the structure, content, and submission of applications.

Does PS14-1403 have a cost sharing or matching requirement?

No. For Categories A, B, and C, cost-sharing or matching funds are not required for this program.

Yes. For Category D, funds for cost sharing is strongly encouraged by this program to support the non-federal share of the project that produces program income resulting from “registration fees” under a limited number of CDC fiscally supported meetings (e.g., HIV Prevention Leadership Summit). The cost sharing will be calculated by dollar amount. Based on their proposed budget and program, applicants are strongly encouraged to identify and document specific cost or contribution proposed to meet the cost sharing requirement and justify its determination. All costs used to satisfy the cost sharing requirement must be documented by the applicant and will be subject to audit. The funded applicant(s) will be strongly encouraged to provide an annual estimate of income that may result from programmatic activities (e.g., meeting registration fees).

For Category D, can CDC provide more descriptive information about meeting support?

In relation to meeting support, there are three broad areas of activity: 1) annual or biannual large, national meetings (e.g., US Conference on AIDS and the HIV Prevention Leadership Summit), 2) the annual CBA Provider Network (CPN) meeting, and 3) monthly web-based meetings to support professional development, communication, and collaboration for all or parts of the CPN. This program will fiscally contribute to a limited number of national meetings. In general, these 3 or 4-day large meetings attract approximately 1500 to 2000 participants. The meeting format includes introductory, intermediate, and advanced plenary sessions, workshops, roundtables, poster presentations, and affinity sessions. All participants, including CPN members, will be responsible for their own registration, travel, hotel, and per diem costs related the large meeting. For meeting support, Category D applicants should consider costs associated with planning and implementation activities such as staff time and travel, meeting spaces or web-based platforms, audio-visual equipment, and printed materials. For those meetings with registration fees, applicants are strongly encouraged to propose a budgetary process to ensure that cost-sharing will offset any program income.

Can an organization currently receiving funding from the Capacity Building Branch (CBB) apply for funding under PS14-1403?

Yes. Any eligible organization currently receiving an award(s) from CBB or any other operating division within CDC can apply for funding under PS14-1403.

Can an organization seeking to directly deliver HIV prevention services to clients (e.g. implement high-impact prevention interventions or strategies) apply for funding under PS14-1403?

No. PS14-1403 will not support the direct delivery of any HIV prevention services. The programmatic goal is to build the capacity of health departments, CBOs, and healthcare organizations to optimally plan, implement, and sustain their High-Impact HIV Prevention (HIP) programs and services.

Can an organization seeking to profit from the delivery of CBA services (e.g., fees to access informational materials, deliver training or technical assistance, or develop new or existing products) apply for funding under PS14-1403?

No. Awardees will be required to deliver free (not for fee) CBA services.

Application

Can I apply if I missed the letter of intent (LOI) submission deadline?

Yes. A LOI is recommended but not required to apply for PS14-1403. It is not considered a part of the application nor used in any way to judge the applicant. A LOI is a non-binding statement that CDC uses solely for internal planning purposes. Applicants are strongly encouraged to submit a LOI for each separate application. Applicants may apply for no more than two of the four funding categories. The LOI must be submitted via email attachment to HIPTA@CDC.GOV no later than August 22, 2013. The LOI must be printed on the applicant organization’s letterhead, be single- or double-spaced, and include the following information:

What are the funding categories for which an organization can apply?

Category A: Health Departments
Optional Program Components (select three):
a) HIV Testing, b) Prevention with HIV-Positive Persons, c) Prevention with High-Risk HIV-Negative Persons, d) Condom Distribution, e) Organizational Development and Management, or f) Policy

Category B: Community-Based Organizations
Optional Program Components (select three):
a) HIV Testing, b) Prevention with HIV-Positive Persons, c) Prevention with High-Risk HIV-Negative Persons, d) Condom Distribution, or e) Organizational Development and Management

Category C: Healthcare Organizations
Optional Program Components (select three):
a) HIV Testing, b) Prevention with HIV-Positive Persons, c) Prevention with High-Risk HIV-Negative Persons, or d) Condom Distribution

Category D: CBA Provider Network (CPN) Resource Center
Required Program Components:
a) Marketing of CPN, b) Supplemental development of CPN products, and c) CPN coordination and meeting support

Can an organization apply for more than one funding category?

Yes. An applicant may apply for up to two of the four available funding categories (i.e., Categories A, B, C, or D). If applying for two categories, an applicant must submit two separate applications.

Can an organization be a primary applicant for two categories AND subcontract with one or more other primary applicants for another category?

Yes. An organization may apply for two categories AND serve as a subcontracted consultant for other applicants in other categories. This action does not compromise the two-category limitation.

Can an organization applying for funding under Categories A, B, or C propose to address fewer or more than three of the listed optional program components?

No. An applicant for Categories A, B, or C must choose exactly 3 of the optional program components listed for a selected category and to be addressed by their proposed CBA program. The applicant must address all (but is not limited to) listed component-specific activities.

Can an organization applying for Category D propose to address fewer than the three listed required program components?

No. An applicant for Category D must choose all of the required program components listed for the category and to be addressed by their proposed CBA program. The applicant must address all (but is not limited to) listed component-specific activities.

What are the general program requirements to be addressed by all applicants?

All applicants (Categories A, B, C, and D) should incorporate all of the following requirements into their proposed programs:

What are the target populations for each category?

Category A: Health Departments – State, tribal, local, and territorial health departments.

Category B: Community-Based Organizations – Private, nonprofit organizations that directly provide HIV prevention services to people living with or at greatest risk of HIV infection including all races/ethnicities of gay, bisexual, and other MSM, African Americans/Blacks, Latinos/Hispanic, IDUs, and transgender individuals. Examples of CBOs include AIDS service organizations, faith-based organizations, and other community-located, non-clinical providers of HIV prevention services.

Category C: Healthcare Organizations – Venues which clinically diagnose and medically treat HIV infection. Healthcare organizations include but are not limited to hospitals, hospital emergency departments, urgent care clinics, community health centers, federally qualified health centers, correctional health clinics, private clinical practices, and clinics based in health departments and CBOs.

Category D: CBA Provider Network (CPN) Resource Center – CPN membership (i.e., all PS14-1403 awardees from Categories A, B, and C), CPN target populations (i.e., health departments, CBOs, and healthcare organizations), and general public.

For Categories A, B, and C, CDC will support which evidence-based behavioral interventions (EBIs)?

Under PS14-1403, CDC will support the delivery of information, training, and technical assistance for the following high-impact evidence-based interventions including (but not limited to):

People Living With HIV (PLWH):

  • CLEAR
  • Healthy Relationships
  • Partnership for Health
  • WILLOW
  • CONNECT for HIV discordant couples
  • START for newly released HIV positive prisoners

  • Injection Drug Users (IDUs):
  • PROMISE

  • Women:
  • PROMISE
  • Sister to Sister

  • Men who have Sex with Men (MSM):
  • d-up!
  • Mpowerment
  • Many Men, Many Voices (3MV)
  • Popular Opinion Leader (POL)
  • Personal Cognitive Counseling (PCC)
  • PROMISE
  • VOICES/VOCES

  • General:
  • Safe in the City
  • RESPECT

  • High-risk youth:
  • PROMISE

  • Transgender populations:
  • Any of the EBIs in the CDC’s Compendium of Effective Behavioral Interventions may be adapted for transgender persons

  • CDC will no longer support the following EBIs:
  • Adult Identity Mentoring (AIM)
  • Cuidate
  • Modelo Intervencion Psichomedica
  • NIA
  • Real AIDS Prevention Project (RAPP)
  • Safety Counts
  • SHIELD
  • SIHLE
  • SISTA
  • Street Smart
  • What information should an applicant know about submitting documentation of current or proposed collaborations?

    Applicants are required to formally document current or proposed collaborative partnerships. Memorandums of Agreement (MOA), Memorandums of Understanding (MOU), letters of commitment or support, and service agreements may document the scope of work, intensity, and duration of collaborations with external partners. Each document should thoroughly describe the proposed collaboration and specific activities, which parties are responsible for what, and the intended outcomes and benefits for the overall CBA program.

    These documents should be electronically submitted with your application. Do not mail or fax these documents. Upload these documents as a PDF file named "Letters of Support, Memoranda of Agreement or Service" to www.grants.gov. Please minimize the number of submitted pages by only providing documents that directly address the matter of program strategy to execute the proposed programmatic approach.

    Should the proposed work plan reflect objectives and activities for only the first budget year or the entire five years of the project?

    Applicants are required to submit both a five-year overview of the project work plan and a year one detailed work plan. The combined submission of these work plans should not exceed 25 pages.

    The project narrative has an 18 page limit, and the work plan has a 25 page limit. However, the work plan is a part of the project narrative. I am confused.

    The project narrative portion of your application includes a background, your proposed approach including work plan, your organizational capacity to implement your proposed approach, and evaluation and performance measurement plan. Excepting the work plan, an applicant has 18 pages to address these issues. The work plan, as a separate document within the project narrative, has an additional 25 pages. Within these 25 pages, you should provide 1) a high-level narrative and graphic (logic model) description of the five year project AND 2) a detailed Year One work plan with outcomes, strategies, objectives, activities, and timelines. Per the funding opportunity announcement, the two documents should be appropriately labeled and submitted separately to www.grants.gov.

    Is there an application checklist to ensure that I am submitting all required materials?

    Yes. An application checklist is available at:
    http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/policies/funding/announcements/PS14-1403/index.html.

    These documents should be electronically submitted with your application. Do not mail or fax these documents. Upload these documents as a PDF file named "Letters of Support, Memoranda of Agreement or Service" to www.grants.gov. Please minimize the number of submitted pages by only providing documents that directly address the matter of program strategy to execute the proposed programmatic approach.

    How do I submit my application and supporting documents?

    Below is a list of acceptable documents for applicants to upload as PDF files with their application submission to www.grants.gov . Applicants may not attach any other documents. If applicants do so, they will not be reviewed. Refer to PS14-1403 for specific requirements regarding naming conventions.

    Funding and Budgets

    What is the total project period funding for PS14-1403?

    CDC will award approximately $130 million in total project period funding. However, this amount is subject to the decreased or increased availability of funds.

    What is the total fiscal year funding for PS14-1403?

    CDC will award approximately $26 million in total fiscal year funding. However, this amount is subject to the decreased or increased availability of funds.

    What is the average award per 12-month budget period?

    What is the range of funding for each award per 12-month budget period?

    When will awards be announced?

    February 28, 2014.

    When is the anticipated award date?

    The anticipated award date is April 1, 2014.

    What is the entire project period?

    The 5-year project period is April 1, 2014 through March 31, 2019.

    Given that an applicant does not know specific programmatic information (e.g., numbers of target populations and related episodes of CBA service delivery; amount of material and product development), how can an applicant develop a budget?

    The applicant will have to consider the parameters of its selected funding category and related program components, proposed programmatic approach and work plan, organizational capacity to execute the proposed program, and available range of funding amounts of awards to forecast a budget that will best support a feasible operational framework. CDC will negotiate the final work plans and budgets with all awardees.

    If applying for two categories, should I submit two separate budgets?

    No. The budget is a separate part of the application. Applicants should name this section “Budget Narrative” and upload as a pdf file to www.grants.gov.

    Should the budget reflect only Year One or the entire 5-year project period?

    The applicant must submit a budget that reflects the proposed work plan for Year One. Although not required, an applicant may also submit a proposed budget for the entire 5-year project.

    If applying for two categories, should I submit two separate budgets?

    Yes. A budget should support each application for two different funding categories.

    What is the purpose of an indirect cost rate agreement?

    The purpose of an indirect cost rate agreement is to publish the reimbursement rate(s) negotiated between the federal government and an awardee which reflects the indirect costs (e.g. facilities and administrative costs) and fringe benefit expenses incurred by the organization in the conduct of federal programs. Indirect cost rate agreements streamline the process of awarding, monitoring, and closing out federal grants. The indirect cost rate allows the grant officer to calculate the appropriate allocation of indirect costs associated with any one project by applying the negotiated indirect cost rate to the respective base used to develop the rate. However, if the grant officer determines that the awardee does not have a currently effective indirect cost rate, the award may not include an amount for indirect costs.

    How does an indirect cost rate impact my award?

    As the provision of training is a significant activity of PS14-1403, the entire funding opportunity announcement (all categories) will have indirect costs budgeted and reimbursed at 8% of modified total direct costs rather than on the basis of a negotiated rate agreement, and are not subject to upward or downward adjustment. Direct cost amounts for equipment (capital expenditures), tuition and fees, and subgrants and subcontracts in excess of $25,000 are excluded from the actual direct cost base for purposes of this calculation. This indirect cost rate is applicable to organizations other than state, tribal, or local governments. Indirect costs under grants to local government agencies (other than those designated as “major” pursuant to OMB Circular A-87) shall be budgeted and reimbursed on the basis of the rates computed and proposed by the local government in its grant application unless the awarding office requests Division of Cost Allocation, HHS (DCA) involvement.

    If I have a negotiated indirect cost rate, am I still required to submit documentation with my application?

    Yes. If the applicant has a negotiated indirect cost rate, it should still be submitted with the application.

    Evaluation

    What is the process for evaluating applications?

    Phase I Review: All eligible applications will be initially reviewed for completeness by the CDC’s Procurement and Grants Office (PGO) staff. In addition, eligible applications will be jointly reviewed for responsiveness by the CDC, DHAP/CBB, and PGO. Incomplete applications and applications that are non-responsive to the eligibility criteria will not advance to Phase II review. Applicants will be notified electronically if the application did not meet eligibility and/or published submission requirements thirty (30) days after the completion of Phase II review.

    Phase II Review: A special emphasis panel will evaluate complete and responsive applications according to the “Application Review Information” section of the FOA. The applications will be objectively reviewed and scored by funding category, thus the requirement for the submission of two separate applications if applying for two funding categories. To move to Phase III Review, an applicant must score at least 65 of the 100 possible points during the special emphasis panel review. In addition to score, CDC may also consider the following factors:

    Phase III Review: Based on results from earlier phases of review, CDC will select applicants for pre-decisional site visits (PDSVs). During PDSVs, CDC staff will meet with appropriate project management and staff including representatives of governing bodies, executive director, program manager, trainers, curriculum developers, technical assistance specialists, evaluators, behavioral scientists, consultants, contractors, etc. The PDSV 1) facilitates a technical review of the application and discussion of the proposed program, 2) further assesses an applicant's capacity to implement the proposed program, and (3) identifies unique programmatic conditions that may require further training, technical assistance, or other resources from CDC.

    Final funding determinations will be based on results from the entire review process. CDC will provide justification for any decision to fund outside of ranked order of scores.

    Is there a particular combination of categories and/or components that is preferred by CDC?

    Applications will be independently reviewed and scored by funding category, thus the requirement for submission of stand-alone applications. For Categories A, B, and C, the selected combinations of program components within an application is not scored during the Special Emphasis Panel or Pre-Decisional Site Visit nor does CDC have an explicit funding preference for specific combinations of program components.

    Post-Award

    How many mandatory meetings/events are awardees expected to attend with the CDC? When will these meetings occur within the program year?

    Awardees, at a minimum, will be expected to participate in several CDC-sponsored orientations and training events scheduled during the first budget period. Additionally, successful applicants are expected to attend an annual meeting of the CBA Providers Network, the bi-annual HIV Prevention Leadership Summit, and the bi-annual National HIV Prevention Conference. Applicants’ budgets should reflect the participation of a minimum of 2 or 3 staff in each of these required activities.

    Will awardees be allowed a "start up" period to further plan and develop their programs prior to implementation of CBA services?

    Awardees will be responsible for providing CBA services beginning in the first year of the project period. An appropriate period for planning and development may be negotiated with the CBB Program Consultant.

    Describe CDC’s right to and use of capacity building products developed under PS14-1403.

    Awardees may elect to copyright products developed using PS14-1403 funding. However, the federal government retains the right to unlimited usage of all products and may authorize others to reproduce and distribute these products. All products must be submitted to the CBB Program Consultant and to the CBA Provider Network Resource Center.

    Will CDC initiate an overall program evaluation of PS14-1403?

    Yes. An overall program evaluation will be conducted. This evaluation will be designed to comply with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) expectations regarding independence, scope, and quality. Awardees will be required to cooperate with CDC and its partners in the conduct of this evaluation.

     


     

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