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Video: Managing Dehydration

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Cholera Treatment Course: Management of Dehydration

Title 1, Chapter 1


General Condition

A child with no dehydration looks well and is alert. A child with some dehydration may be restless and irritable. A child with severe dehydration will be lethargic or even unconscious. [Severely dehydrated child: Jaharadin]

The eyes of a child with no dehydration look normal. They are not sunken and are moist. The eyes of a child with some dehydration may appear sunken. The eyes of a child with severe dehydration may be very sunken and may be dry.

When a child with no dehydration cries, there are tears. Tears may be absent in children with some or severe dehydration. In a child with no dehydration, the mouth and tongue are moist. The mouth and tongue of a child with some dehydration may appear dry. With severe dehydration, they are very dry.

Thirst

A child with no dehydration drinks normally. With some dehydration, a child is usually thirsty and drinks eagerly. A child with severe dehydration may drink poorly or may not be able to drink.

Response to the Skin Pinch

When the skin is pinched on a child with no dehydration, it  goes back quickly. On a child with some dehydration, it goes back slowly. On a child with severe dehydration, the skin goes back very slowly.

General condition, thirst, and the response to the skin pinch are all key signs.At least 2 signs belonging to one of these categories of dehydration, including at least 1 key sign, tell you whether to treat a child for some or severe dehydration.

Title 1, Chapter 2

After 4 hours of receiving rehydration therapy, Jaharadin was lethargic, but his general condition was improved. Within another 2 hours, he was able to sit up, although his appetite was poor and he rejected food or milk. However, he was now capable of drinking ORS solution on his own. He was slightly lethargic, but his general condition was improving all the time. His skin, when pinched, returned to normal much more quickly than before. By the next morning, his appetite was back to normal, although he still was drinking ORS solution. Within an hour, he was playing and ready to go home. It is difficult to believe that this was the child who was so seriously ill only 18 hours before.

[8:47 minutes]

Case Studies

Sections of the "Managing Dehydration" video do not have sound. They are intended to be used as visual aids for case study teaching materials. A case study of a child with dehydration runs from 3:03 to 5:00. A case study of an adult with dehydration runs from 5:00 to 6:38.

 

CDC Resources: Haiti Cholera Outbreak — www.cdc.gov/haiticholera
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