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Content on this page was developed during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic and has not been updated.

  • The H1N1 virus that caused that pandemic is now a regular human flu virus and continues to circulate seasonally worldwide.
  • The English language content on this website is being archived for historic and reference purposes only.
  • For current, updated information on seasonal flu, including information about H1N1, see the CDC Seasonal Flu website.

CDC Health Update: Risk of Swine Flu Associated with Travel to Affected Areas

Distributed via Health Alert Network
April 26, 2009, 11:00 EST (11:00 AM EDT)
CDCHAN-000282-2009-04-26-ALT-N

NOTE: This document is provided for historical purposes only and may not provide our most accurate and up-to-date information. The most current information can be found on the Home Page.

Public health officials within the United States and throughout the world are investigating outbreaks of swine influenza (swine flu).

Swine flu is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by a type A influenza virus that regularly causes outbreaks of influenza among pigs. Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans; however, human infections with swine flu do occur. Public health officials have determined that this strain of swine flu virus spreads from human to human and can cause illness.

The outbreak is ongoing and additional cases are expected. For more information concerning swine flu infection, please see the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website.. Specific information on travel precautions and an update on the affected areas is available.

The symptoms of swine flu in people are similar to the symptoms of seasonal flu in humans and may include:

  • Fever (greater than 100°F or 37.8°C)
  • Sore throat
  • Cough
  • Stuffy nose
  • Chills
  • Headache and body aches
  • Fatigue

Some people have reported diarrhea and vomiting associated with swine flu. Severe illness (pneumonia and respiratory failure) and deaths have been reported with swine flu infection in people. Like seasonal flu, swine flu may cause a worsening of underlying chronic medical conditions.

People entering the United States who are experiencing symptoms consistent with swine flu and have traveled to an affected area, or have been exposed to someone possibly infected with swine flu, during the last 7 days should report their illnesses to their health care provider immediately and inform them of their recent travel.

People traveling from the United States to affected areas should be aware of the risk of illness with swine flu and take precautions.

To prevent the spread of swine flu:

  • Avoid contact with ill persons.
  • When you cough or sneeze, cover your nose and mouth with a tissue or your sleeve (if
    you do not have a tissue). Throw used tissues in a trash can.
  • After you cough or sneeze, wash your hands with soap and water, or use an alcohol-based hand gel.
  • If you think you are ill with flu, avoid close contact with others as much as possible.
    Stay at home or in your hotel room. Seek medical care if you are severely ill (such
    as having trouble breathing). There are antiviral medications for prevention and
    treatment of swine flu that a doctor can prescribe. Do not go to work, school, or
    travel while ill.

Categories of Health Alert messages:

Health Alert - conveys the highest level of importance; warrants immediate action or attention.
Health Advisory - provides important information for a specific incident or situation; may not require immediate action.
Health Update - provides updated information regarding an incident or situation; unlikely to require immediate action.

This Message was distributed to State and Local Health Officers, Public Information Officers, Epidemiologists and HAN Coordinators as well as Clinician organizations.

You have received this message based upon the information contained within our emergency notification data base. If you have a different or additional e-mail or fax address that you would like us to use please contact your State-based Health Alert Network program at your State or local health department.

 
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    Atlanta, GA 30333
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    (800-232-4636)
    TTY: (888) 232-6348
  • Contact CDC-INFO
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