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This website is archived for historical purposes and is no longer being maintained or updated. For updated information on the current flu season, see the CDC Seasonal Flu website.

Site last updated August 11, 2010 1:00 PM ET

Situation Update

Map of flu activity in the U.S.The U.S. Public Health Emergency for 2009 H1N1 Influenza expired on June 23, 2010. On August 10, 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) International Health Regulations (IHR) Emergency Committee declared an end to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic globally. For information about CDC’s response to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, visit The 2009 H1N1 Pandemic: Summary Highlights, April 2009-April 2010.  Internationally, 2009 H1N1 viruses and seasonal influenza viruses are co-circulating in many parts of the world.  It is likely that the 2009 H1N1 virus will continue to spread for years to come, like a regular seasonal influenza virus.

See More on Past H1N1 Updates »

Vaccination

CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccination as the first and most important step in protecting against the flu. The U.S. 2010-2011 seasonal influenza vaccine will protect against an H3N2 virus, an influenza B virus, and the 2009 H1N1 virus that emerged last year to cause the first global pandemic in more than 40 years and resulted in substantial illness, hospitalizations and deaths. Seasonal 2010-11 vaccine has begun shipping from manufacturers and CDC recommends that everyone 6 months and older get a 2010-2011 flu vaccine for the upcoming season as vaccine is available. 



 

Other 2009 H1N1 Flu Topics

Diagnosis

How the illness is diagnosed, recommendations for lab testing…

Infection Control

Healthcare guidance, occupational safety, facemasks & respirators…

Antivirals/Treatment

Use of Tamiflu and Relenza for treatment or prevention of H1N1 flu…

Emergency Use Authorization

Info about CDC-requested & FDA-issued EUA drugs & devices…

What You Can Do to Stay Healthy

  • Get vaccinated against seasonal and 2009 H1N1 flu. Vaccination is the best protection we have against flu. CDC is now encouraging everyone to get vaccinated against 2009 H1N1. The vaccines to protect against 2009 H1N1 are widely available. Supplies of seasonal flu vaccine may be limited. Find a vaccine
  • Influenza is thought to spread mainly person-to-person through coughing or sneezing of infected people.
  • Take everyday actions to stay healthy.
    • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread that way.
    • Stay home if you get sick. CDC recommends that you stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them.
  • Follow public health advice regarding school closures, avoiding crowds and other social distancing measures.
  • Stay informed. This website will be updated regularly as information becomes available.
  • Call 1-800-CDC-INFO for more information.
 
Contact Us:
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    1600 Clifton Rd
    Atlanta, GA 30333
  • 800-CDC-INFO
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    TTY: (888) 232-6348
  • Contact CDC-INFO
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