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Media: Virtual Press Kit

Get Smart Campaign Materials Press Kit

Although this press kit was created in 2003 it is still relevant. You also may want to use the Get Smart About Antibiotics Week Media Tools/online materials (podcasts, e-cards, feature stories, logos) created and available August 2008.

Download Complete 2003 Virtual Press Kit

National media launch: September 2003 (.pdf [2MB, 21 pages]

Download Individual Sections

Table of Contents

Table of Contents [44 KB, 1 page]

This file lists all the items that make up the entire 2003 press kit, which includes the media advisory, press release, campaign partners, speaker biographies, CDC advisory to parents, five hints to understanding antibiotic use, cold and flu consumer FAQs, why cold and flu illnesses don't call for antibiotics, bacteria or virus illness chart, tips for parents about fluid in the middle ear and runny noses, and two print ads.


Media Advisory

Media Advisory [69 KB, 2 pages]

HHS media advisory dated September 2003: Public health partners unveil new campaign to promote awareness of proper antibiotic use.


Press Release

Press Release [47 KB, 1 page]

CDC press release dated September 2003. CDC news conference - Antibotic resistance. Includes discussion with then Dr. Richard Besser, MD, Medical Director, Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work campaign...


Campaign Partners

Campaign Partners [83 KB, 2 pages]

Lists the 2003 campaign partners [Food and Drug Administration (FDA), American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics (APUA), American Medical Association (AMA), and the Council for Affordable Quality Healthcare (CAQH)].


Speakers Biographies

Speaker Biographies [80 KB, 2 pages]

Includes bios from Dr. Besser, medical director of the Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work campaign in 2003; Mr. Pitts, the FDA associate commissioner for External Relations in 2003; Dr. Michael Flemming, 2003 president-elect of the AAFP; and Margaret B Rennels, MD, FAAP, 2003 member of the AAP.


Sniffle Sneeze brochure

Sniffle or Sneeze? No Antibiotics Please [53 KB, 1 page].

CDC advises parents about cold, flu, and antibiotics. Antibiotics don't work for a cold or the flu because antibiotics kill bacteria, not viruses. And, colds, flu, and most sore throats are caused by viruses.


Antibiotic Usage

A Prescription for Parents: Five Hints to Understanding Antibiotic Usage [92 KB, 1 page]

Unnecessary antibiotics can be harmful to your child. This document tells you what you can do to protect your child from antibiotic-resistant bacteria, what the color change in mucus can mean, when not to get antibiotics for illnesses, and how to know if your child has a viral or a bacterial infection.


Consumer FAQ

Cold and Flu: Consumer FAQs [90 KB, 2 pages]

Answers common questions about colds and the flu. For instance, what kinds of infections are caused by viruses and should not be treated with antibiotics, when to take antibiotics, etc.


Cold and Flu Season

Cold and Flu Season: No Reason for Antibiotics [93 KB, 3 pages]

Explains why antibiotics are not for colds and the flu. It lists the types of germs that cause most infections, that taking antibiotics for viral infections will increase the risk of antibiotic resistance, what you can do for colds and flu, and steps to reduce antibiotic use.


Cold and Flu Season

Bacteria or Virus Illness Chart

Take a look at this chart to find out which upper respiratory infections are usually caused by viruses — germs that are not killed by antibiotics.


Cold and Flu Season

Fluid in the Middle Ear: Tips for Parents [90 KB, 1 page]

A doctor said your child has fluid in the middle ear, also called otitis (oh-TIE-Tus) media with effusion (uh-FEW-zhun) (OME). Fluid usually does not bother children, and it almost always goes away on its own. This does not have to be treated with antibiotics, unless it lasts for a few months. Here are some facts about OME and ear infections.


Cold and Flu Season

A Child's Runny Nose: Tips for Parents [90 KB, 1 page]

Your child has a runny nose. This is a normal part of what happens during the common cold and as it gets better. Here are some facts about colds and runny noses.


Cold and Flu Season

Print Ad - African America [293 KB, 1 page]

Snort. Sniffle. Sneeze. No Antibiotics Please. African American Poster
Size: 8.5" x 11"
Target Audience: Parents of young children and adult consumers ages 18-49 years

This print ad is intended to raise awareness about appropriate antibiotic use for upper respiratory infections in children. It explains that antibiotics are not the best answer for a cold or flu.

Note: This print ad also is available as a 17" X 22" poster.


Cold and Flu Season

Print Ad - Caucasian [292 KB,1 page]

Snort. Sniffle. Sneeze. No Antibiotics Please. Caucasian Poster
Size: 8.5" x 11"
Target Audience: Parents of young children and adult consumers ages 18-49 years

This print ad is intended to raise awareness about appropriate antibiotic use for upper respiratory infections in children. It explains that antibiotics are not the best answer for a cold or flu.

This print ad also is available as a 17" X 22" poster.


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