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Science Ambassador Lecturer Biography

    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is one of the most preventable causes of birth defects. This presentation detailed characteristics of those with FAS, including central nervous system dysfunction and specific patterns of facial features, as well as described the effects of FAS on human development. In addition, the presentation explained how an intervention study called Project CHOICES (Changing High-Risk AlcOhol use and Increasing Contraception Effectiveness Study) seeks to understand those who might drink during pregnancy, design an intervention to change risk behaviors based on their understanding of this population, and then evaluate the impact of the intervention.


    Jacquelyn Bertrand, PhD

    Dr. Jacquelyn Bertrand has worked for 15 years in the field of developmental disabilities. She received her research training at the University of Connecticut and her clinical training at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. She is a licensed psychologist in the state of Georgia. Dr. Bertrand has conducted federally funded research on the neurodevelopment of children, including children with prenatal exposure to alcohol. Since 1996, she has worked in the developmental disabilities and fetal alcohol syndrome prevention programs at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, she is a member of the fetal alcohol syndrome diagnostic team at the Marcus Institute and an affiliate of the Kennedy Krieger Institute at Emory University. Dr. Bertrand has published many scientific articles and presented nationally and internationally on fetal alcohol syndrome, focusing on developmental and family issues associated with the disorder. Currently, Dr. Bertrand oversees a multi-site project to develop and evaluate scientifically based interventions for children with disabilities resulting from prenatal exposure to alcohol and for their families. In addition, she conducts international research on the topic of neurodevelopment in children with low-to-moderate prenatal exposure to alcohol. Finally, Dr. Bertrand is a member of several local and national committees devoted to improving prevention of prenatal exposure to alcohol and improving the lives of affected children and their families.


    Louise Floyd, DSN, RN
    R. Louise Floyd, DSN, RN is a behavioral scientist and Team Leader of the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) Prevention Team, Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD), National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Floyd received her BS degree in nursing from Berea College, Berea, Kentucky; a master's in nursing from Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia; and a doctorate of nursing from the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama. She joined CDC in 1988, and has been working in the field of FAS since 1992. The FAS Prevention Team carries out a comprehensive program involving more than 30 cooperative agreements that conduct surveillance and prevention research and service delivery programs. Dr. Floyd oversees the National Task Force on FAS/FAE established in 2000, served as its first executive secretary, and currently serves as the Federal Delegated Official. She has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals and is a recipient of the Faye Abdellah Publication Award, the highest award in the U.S. Public Health Service given to a nurse for contributions to the scientific literature. Her research interest is prenatal alcohol exposure and its prevention.


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Page Last Modified: March 7, 2011

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