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DPDx

DPDx is an education resource designed for health professionals and laboratory scientists. For an overview including prevention and control visit www.cdc.gov/parasites/cysticercosis.

Cysticercosis

[Taenia solium]

Larval Taenia solium cyst in a section of a lesion found in the right frontal lobe of a patient stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), magnification 40×.

Larval Taenia solium cyst in a section of a lesion found in the right frontal lobe of a patient stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), magnification 40×.


Cross-sections of cysticerci stained with H&E, at 40x magnification

Cross-sections of cysticerci stained with H&E, at 40x magnification


Causal Agents

The larval form (cysticercus) of the pork tapeworm, Taenia solium.


Life Cycle

Life cycle of Cysticercosis

Cysticercosis is an infection of both humans and pigs with the larval stages of the parasitic cestode, Taenia solium. This infection is caused by ingestion of eggs shed in the feces of a human tapeworm carrierThe number 1. Pigs and humans become infected by ingesting eggs or gravid proglottidsThe number 2, The number 7 . Humans are infected either by ingestion of food contaminated with feces, or by autoinfection. In the latter case, a human infected with adult T. solium can ingest eggs produced by that tapeworm, either through fecal contamination or, possibly, from proglottids carried into the stomach by reverse peristalsis. Once eggs are ingested, oncospheres hatch in the intestineThe number 3, The number 8 invade the intestinal wall, and migrate to striated muscles, as well as the brain, liver, and other tissues, where they develop into cysticerci . In humans, cysts can cause serious sequellae if they localize in the brain, resulting in neurocysticercosis. The parasite life cycle is completed, resulting in human tapeworm infection, when humans ingest undercooked pork containing cysticerciThe number 4 . Cysts evaginate and attach to the small intestine by their scolexThe number 5. Adult tapeworms develop, (up to 2 to 7 m in length and produce less than 1000 proglottids, each with approximately 50,000 eggs) and reside in the small intestine for yearsThe number 6.

Geographic Distribution:

Taenia solium is found worldwide. Because pigs are intermediate hosts of the parasite, completion of the life cycle occurs in regions where humans live in close contact with pigs and eat undercooked pork. Taeniasis and cysticercosis are very rare in Muslim countries. It is important to note that human cysticercosis is acquired by ingesting T. solium eggs shed in the feces of a human T. solium tapeworm carrier, and thus can occur in populations that neither eat pork nor share environments with pigs.

Clinical Presentation

The symptoms of cysticercosis are caused by the development of cysticerci in various sites. Of greatest concern is cerebral cysticercosis (or neurocysticercosis), which can cause diverse manifestations including seizures, mental disturbances, focal neurologic deficits, and signs of space-occupying intracerebral lesions. Death can occur suddenly. Extracerebral cysticercosis can cause ocular, cardiac, or spinal lesions with associated symptoms. Asymptomatic subcutaneous nodules and calcified intramuscular nodules can be encountered.

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  • Page last reviewed November 29, 2013
  • Page last updated November 29, 2013
  • Content source: Global Health - Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria
  • Notice: Linking to a non-federal site does not constitute an endorsement by HHS, CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the site.
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