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Diabetes Report Card 2012: National and State Profile of Diabetes and Its Complications

Trends in Diabetes Outcomes

Figures 5, 6, and 7 offer examples of trends in diabetes complications in the United States over the past 2 decades. Among adults with diagnosed diabetes, death rates from hyperglycemic crisis have declined since the mid-1980s. Diabetic hyperglycemic crises are serious health events that can occur in people with diabetes, and they can lead to death. Rates of lower-limb amputation (of legs or feet) and kidney failure (end-stage renal disease) have declined since the mid-1990s. These declines may be attributed in part to improvements in the rates of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking in recent decades.10 Other possible reasons include improvements in blood glucose control;13 early detection and management of diabetes complications; and improvements in preventive care, treatment, and diabetes care management.14, 15

Figure 5. Death Rates for Hyperglycemic Crises as Underlying Cause, by Age, United States, 1980–2007
Figure 5 shows death rates for hyperglycemic crises as the underlying cause of death, by age, in the United States during 1980–2007. Death rates per 100,000 people with diabetes declined in all age groups, with the largest decreases occurring among those aged 75 years or older. This figure uses National Health Interview Survey data and National Vital Statistics System data from the National Diabetes Surveillance System.
Source: National Diabetes Surveillance System, National Health Interview Survey data and National Vital Statistics System data.

Figure 6. Hospital Discharge Rates for Nontraumatic Lower-Limb Amputation, United States, 1988–2008
Figure 6 shows hospital discharge rates for nontraumatic lower-limb amputation in the United States during 1988–2008. Rates per 1,000 people with diabetes declined from 7.3 in 1988 to 3.2 in 2008. The data in this figure were age-adjusted; see the Technical Notes section of the report for more details. This figure uses National Hospital Discharge Survey data and National Health Interview Survey data from the National Diabetes Surveillance System.
Data were adjusted. See Technical Notes for more details.
Source: National Diabetes Surveillance System, National Hospital Discharge Survey data and National Health Interview Survey data

Figure 7. Incidence of Diabetes-Related End-Stage Renal Disease, United States, 1980–2008
Figure 7 shows the incidence of diabetes-related end-stage renal disease in the United States during 1980–2008. Incidence per 100,000 people with diabetes increased from 1980 until the mid-1990s, but then began to decrease. The data in this figure were age-adjusted; see the Technical Notes section of the report for more details. This figure uses U.S. Renal Data System data and National Health Interview Survey data from the National Diabetes Surveillance System.
Data were adjusted. See Technical Notes for more details.
Source: National Diabetes Surveillance System, U.S. Renal Data System data and National Health Interview Survey data

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