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Diabetes Report Card 2012: National and State Profile of Diabetes and Its Complications

Prediabetes: A Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Unfortunately, prediabetes can put people at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

Although about 33% of U.S. adults have prediabetes,10,11 awareness of this risk condition is low. Less than 10% of U.S. adults with prediabetes report that they have ever been told that they have prediabetes.11

Table 2 presents estimates of the percentage of U.S. adults who reported ever being told by a doctor that they have prediabetes. Data for adults with prediabetes who have never been tested for diabetes or who have not been told that they are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes are not included. State estimates of prediabetes awareness range from 4.4% in Vermont to 10.2% in Tennessee. These estimates are consistent with analyses of national data that suggest awareness of prediabetes is low.

Progression to type 2 diabetes among those with prediabetes is not inevitable. Studies have shown that people with prediabetes can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes by losing 5%–7% of their body weight and getting at least 150 minutes per week of moderate physical activity.12

Because awareness of prediabetes is low, we anticipate that the percentage of people who are aware that they have prediabetes will rise as diabetes prevention efforts progress.

Table 2. Percentages of U.S. Adults Who Have Ever Been Told They Have Prediabetes, by State, 2010

StatePercentage (%)
Alabama7.0
Alaska7.0
Arizona6.2
ArkansasNA
California8.0
Colorado5.7
Connecticut5.3
Delaware6.1
District of Columbia5.5
Florida6.4
Georgia5.7
Hawaii7.5
Idaho7.3
Illinois5.5
Indiana6.2
Iowa5.4
Kansas6.1
Kentucky7.2
Louisiana6.1
Maine6.5
MarylandNA
Massachusetts4.8
Michigan6.3
Minnesota6.6
Mississippi6.7
MissouriNA
Montana4.7
Nebraska5.4
NevadaNA
New Hampshire6.8
New JerseyNA
New Mexico5.7
New York5.5
North Carolina6.1
North DakotaNA
Ohio5.3
Oklahoma6.5
Oregon6.1
Pennsylvania5.9
Rhode IslandNA
South Carolina6.6
South Dakota5.2
Tennesse10.2
Texas6.4
Utah5.1
Vermont4.4
Virginia5.7
WashingtonNA
West Virginia6.1
Wisconsin6.2
Wyoming4.8

NA = not available.
Data were age adjusted. See Technical Notes for more details.
Source: National Diabetes Surveillance System, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data.

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