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Appalachian Diabetes Control and Translation Project


Purpose

To reduce the impact of diabetes on people who live in high-risk
(distressed) counties in the Appalachian Region of the United States

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Objectives

Using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) "Diabetes Today" program as the planning translation model, the project will

  • Enhance local leadership, develop policies, and assure collection of local data
  • Provide epidemiological assistance
  • Help plan, implement, and evaluate aggressive community-based diabetes control and prevention activities.

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Preliminary results / accomplishments

From October 1, 2001, to September 30, 2002, partners in at least five counties will

  • Develop community partnerships around the problem of diabetes
  • Determine the magnitude of the problem in their county
  • Plan and begin a series of activities addressing diabetes.

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Partners

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Target audience

  • People in the Appalachian Region who have or are at risk for diabetes.

About 23 million people live in the 410 counties of the Appalachian Region; 42 percent of the Region's population is rural, compared with 20 percent of the national population. Appalachia is a 200,000-square-mile region that follows the spine of the Appalachian Mountains from southern New York to northern Mississippi.

For more information, call the CDC Diabetes Inquiry Line toll free
1-800-CDC-INFO
1-888-232-6348 TTY or Contact CDC-INFO.

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Contact Us:
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    1600 Clifton Rd
    Atlanta, GA 30333
  • 800-CDC-INFO
    (800-232-4636)
    TTY: (888) 232-6348
  • Contact CDC-INFO
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC-INFO