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Diabetes Interactive Atlas

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is the Diabetes Interactive Atlas?

The Diabetes Interactive Atlas is an Interactive Web tool that allows the user to view data and trends for diagnosed diabetes (new and existing cases), obesity, and leisure-time physical inactivity at national, state, and county levels.

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What kinds of data are included in the Diabetes Interactive Atlas?

The users of the Diabetes Interactive Atlas will be able to access state and county-level data in the United States, county rankings, and maps and motion charts to examine how changes in diabetes coincide with changes in obesity over time and by geographic location.

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Where does the Diabetes Interactive Atlas get the data?

Data from CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were used to obtain state-level estimates of new and existing cases of diagnosed diabetes and selected risk factors. Data from the BRFSS and from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Population Estimates Program were used to model the estimates at the county level. Learn more about the methods to come up with county-level estimates.

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Are the same types of data available for all years?

County-level estimates including age-adjusted rates and rankings and state-level estimates are available for all years beginning in 2004 to the current year of available data.

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Why are the percentages age-adjusted?

The age-adjusted percentage is a mock estimate to be able to compare between populations that have different age distributions. It represents what the raw percentage in the population would have been if that population had the same age distribution as a "standard" population. A "standard" population is a population in which the age breakdown is known exactly, for example, as a result of a census.

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Are there data for my state or territory?

State-level data are available for the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Data for counties and county equivalents (e.g., parishes, boroughs, municipios) are available for the 50 states and Puerto Rico.

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How often will data be added?

State and county-level estimates will be updated from time to time as new data are released from CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and from the U.S. Census Bureau.

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The county-level estimates are different from estimates that I have seen elsewhere. Why?

The county-level estimates are modeled, not direct, estimates that were obtained using Bayesian multilevel modeling techniques. Three years of data were used to obtain a single estimate. Learn more about the methods to come up with county-level estimates.

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What are county rankings?

A county's rank is a reflection of its burden of the disease or condition relative to other counties. Ranks for county-level data of diagnosed diabetes (existing and new cases), obesity, and physical inactivity were based on age-adjusted rates. Learn more about the methods to obtain county ranks.

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How can we map county ranks?

For each indicator (e.g., diagnosed diabetes), confidence intervals of counties' ranks were used to identify and map counties that were either below the median rank or above the median rank for all counties. The confidence intervals around these ranks convey the uncertainty associated with a county's rank and need to be taken into account before reaching conclusions based on ranks. For more information about mapping county ranks, see the related Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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How do I view a trend line for my state or territory?

Instructions to view trends are found in the Tutorial, How to Use Interactive Atlas.

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How do I view a map?

Instructions to view trends are found in the Tutorial, How to Use Interactive Atlas.

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How do I include this information in a presentation?

The Diabetes Interactive Atlas includes Powerpoint downloadable files to ‘copy and paste’ slides to your presentation. Click the Powerpoint icon found on the Features page to open the file. The suggested citation is, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes Interactive Atlas Web site http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/atlas/. Accessed [add date].

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How do I download data from the Diabetes Interactive Atlas?

The Diabetes Interactive Atlas includes Excel downloadable files to access the data. Click the Excel icon found on the Features page to open the file. The suggested citation is, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes Interactive Atlas Web site http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/atlas/. Accessed [add date].

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How do I cite the Diabetes Interactive Atlas?

The suggested citation is, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diabetes Interactive Atlas Web site http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/atlas/. Accessed [add date].

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How do I find out more information on diabetes, obesity, or physical inactivity?

Obesity and physical inactivity are risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes. Learn more about how to prevent and control diabetes.

 
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