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Substance Abuse Prevention and Control SAPC Treatment Providers Matched by Location with Edward E. Roybal Health CenterSubstance Abuse Prevention and Control SAPC Treatment Providers Matched by Location with Edward E. Roybal Health Center

Click to download PDF [PDF-3M]

Abstract: The specific aims of this study were to integrate technology to help automate linkage to care processes. GIS was used to Identify Substance Use Service Providers and Dept of Health Services within 5 miles. Identified 16 service providers within 5 miles of the Edward R. Roybal Health Center. This helped enhance services, partnerships and referral systems.

Location: USA

Software used: ArcMap10.1

Data used: Substance Use Service Providers and Dept of Health Services within 5 miles

Methods used: Network Analysis: Location Allocation method

Creator: James Martinez, Epidemiologist, Department of Public Health

Contact phone: 6262994542

Contact email: jammartinez@ph.lacounty.gov


Illinois Department of Public Health Office of Health Promotion Colorectal Cancer Age-Adjusted Incidence and Mortality Rates and Federally Qualified Health CentersIllinois Department of Public Health Office of Health Promotion Colorectal Cancer Age-Adjusted Incidence and Mortality Rates and Federally Qualified Health Centers

Click to download PDF [PDF-863K]

Abstract: The map shows age-adjusted colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates per 100,000 population for Illinois residents by county and the locations of Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC). The purposes of the map are to identify areas with increased colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates, educate the public and stakeholders on the burden of colorectal cancer in Illinois, and assist with future collaborative efforts toward reducing the burden of colorectal cancer among Illinois residents. The main planned future collaborative effort this map is intended to assist with is to help the Illinois Cancer Partnership (ICP) and stakeholders identify FQHC's that serve counties with high incidence and/or mortality rates in order to collaborate with the local FQHC in the ICP's efforts to increase colorectal cancer screening and decrease colorectal cancer mortality in the most efficient and effective approach.

Location: IL

Software used: ArcGIS Desktop 10 Service Pack 5

Data used: National Center for Health Statistics (2006-2010) Mortality data as of April 2013; Illinois State Cancer Registry (2006-2010) Incidence data as of November 2012; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration Data Warehouse, Federally Qualified Health Center data as of July 10, 2013

Methods used: County-level colorectal cancer mortality rates from the National Center for Health Statistics and county-level colorectal cancer incidence rates from the Illinois State Cancer Registry were imported into ArcGIS to overlay colorectal cancer mortality rates onto colorectal cancer incidence rates. In addition, ArcGIS was used to geocode the locations of Federally Qualified Health Centers obtained through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. These geocoded locations were plotted overtop both incidence and mortality rates.

Creator: Benjamin Arbise, Statistical Research Specialist , Illinois Department of Public Health, 525-535 West Jefferson Street, Springfield, Illinois 62761

Contact phone: (217) 558-2662

Contact email: ben.arbise@illinois.gov


Nebraska Heart Disease Mortality over TimeNebraska Heart Disease Mortality over Time

Click to download PDF [PDF-1M]

Abstract: Heart disease is the second leading cause of death and hospitalization in Nebraska. This county-level map demonstrates the geographic disparities that exist in age-adjusted heart disease mortality rates in Nebraska over time. The map is separated into two time periods, one from 2002-2006 and another from 2007-2011. The map uses the first maps mortality rates for both maps in order to show the change in mortality rates over time. For the earlier period of 2002-2006 the rates are highest in the Northeast and the south-central section of the state. In 2007-2011 mortality rates have gone down in almost all areas of the state. Mortality rates are still a little bit higher in the south-central but even these are lower overall. This map will be helpful in determining the concentration of mortality due to heart disease among the two time periods. It will also be helpful to look at where heart disease mortality remains high in 2007-2011 and why there has not been a reduction in these counties mortality.

Location: NE

Software used: ArcMap 10.0

Data used: Death Certificate Data from the Nebraska Department of Vital Records 2002-2011

Methods used: County level mortality data are compiled in two 5-year time periods. Age-adjusted rates (2000 US Standard Population) for all counties across all time periods are ranked into quintiles, with those quintile cutpoints held constant across the three time periods. This allows the viewer to see both the relative ranking of each county within each time period, but follow the general decline across all counties over the time period.

Creator: David DeVries, Health Surveillance Specialist, Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services

Contact phone: (402) 471-3279

Contact email: david.devries@nebraska.gov


Lifestyle and risk behavior, adults in Hennepin County, Minnesota, 2010Lifestyle and risk behavior, adults in Hennepin County, Minnesota, 2010

Click to download PDF [PDF-1M]

Abstract: This map presents population-level data on rates of obesity, smoking, lack of leisure-time activity, and prevalence of eating more than 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day. For smoking, rates range from below 10% in suburban Hennepin County regions to 23.8% in North Minneapolis. A similar pattern is found in the rate of lacking leisure time physical activity. The inverse pattern is observed for eating five or more fruits or vegetables per day, with the rate in North Minneapolis is lowest, and the rates among North and West suburban inner ring are second lowest, however, this is expected as this is the one measure that would be considered health-promoting, as opposed to the others which are detrimental. This map supports the contention that population measures of physical activity, smoking, nutrition, and obesity are correlated at the population level and demonstrate similar geographic distribution. This map shows the geographic variation of four lifestyle and risk behaviors and allows examination in a single map for patterns and correlations. Along with the map on cardiovascular death rates and map on cardiovascular disease and related prevalence it informs local health department management, program staff, and relevant community groups and organizations on the current status and distribution of lifestyle and risk behaviors contributing to the burdens of cardiovascular disease and stroke, and to guide and monitor the focus of public health intervention.

Location: Hennepin County, MN

Software used: Arc GIS 10

Data used: Hennepin County Human Services and Public Health Department, Survey of the Health of All the Population and the Environment (SHAPE), 2010. SHAPE reporting regions were created by HSPHD staff based on former Human Service Council areas and aggregated Minneapolis communities.

Methods used: SHAPE 2010 Adult Survey is a self-administrated mail survey to randomly selected adults. Rates for risk factors displayed on this map were calculated from the responses provided by 7000 adults age 18 and over who answered the survey. All data represent self-report of the specified condition or behavior. Respondent addresses were geocoded and aggregated within10 sub-county areas. Data was weighted to represent county population and data analyses were performed using STATA to account for complex survey design. The definition of each of the indicators can be found in the technical notes of SHAPE 2010 Adult Data Book, accessible at www.hennepin.us/shape. Geographic areas were defined according to the Hennepin County and the City of Minneapolis planning districts.

Creator: Mei Ding, Principal Planning Analyst, Hennepin County Human Services and Public Health Department (HSPHD)

Contact phone: (612) 348-6309

Contact email: mei.ding@co.hennepin.mn.us


Cardiovascular disease and related conditions, adults in Hennepin County, Minnesota, 2010Cardiovascular disease and related conditions, adults in Hennepin County, Minnesota, 2010

Click to download PDF [PDF-563K]

Abstract: This map shows geographic distributions of different cardiovascular disease (CVD) and related conditions among adults in Hennepin County. Using hypertension as example, the rates in North Minneapolis and inner suburban rings are higher than the rates in other parts of city of Minneapolis, and outer suburban ring. However, for diabetes, rates are higher in the North Minneapolis and West and South suburban rings. There is no clear pattern among these four chronic disease and conditions in geographic distributions. This could be partially due to the fact that the rate is not age-standardized or could reflect differences in access to care. To show the geographic variation of four cardiovascular disease and related conditions in a single map, and to allow examination of patterns or correlations. This map, along with the map on CVD death rates and the map on lifestyle and risk behaviors, informs local health department management, program staff, and relevant community groups and organizations of the burden of the CVD and stroke in the county, and to guide and monitor the focus of public health intervention.

Location: Hennepin County, MN

Software used: Arc GIS 10

Data used: Hennepin County Human Services and Public Health Department, Survey of the Health of All the Population and the Environment (SHAPE), 2010. SHAPE reporting regions were created by HSPHD staff based on former Human Service Council areas and aggregated Minneapolis communities.

Methods used: SHAPE 2010 Adult Survey is a self-administrated mail survey to randomly selected adults. Rates for the conditions displayed on this map were calculated from the responses provided by 7,000 adults age 18 and over who answered the survey questions about whether they had ever been told by a doctor that they have the specified condition. Respondent addresses were geocoded and aggregated within10 sub-county areas. Data were weighted to represent county population and data analyses were performed using STATA to account for complex survey design. The definition of each of the indicators can be found in the technical notes of SHAPE 2010 Adult Data Book, accessible at www.hennepin.us/shape. Geographic areas are defined according to Hennepin County and City of Minneapolis planning districts.

Creator: Mei Ding, Principal Planning Analyst, Hennepin County Human Services and Public Health Department (HSPHD)

Contact phone: (612) 348-6309

Contact email: mei.ding@co.hennepin.mn.us


Washington County, MN LANA Trained Nutrition Sites for Targeted PopulationsWashington County, MN LANA Trained Nutrition Sites for Targeted Populations

Click to download PDF [PDF-696K]

Abstract: From 2010-2011 Washington County introduced evidenced based nutrition curriculum to child care providers with funding from the Statewide Health Improvement Program. The Learning About Nutrition through Activities (LANA) Program goal is to help young children, ages 2 to 5, learn to taste, eat, and enjoy more fruits and vegetables in order to promote good health, including healthy weight and reduced risk of chronic disease. The goal of Washington County Department of Public Health and Environment is to identify and address health inequities for residents. Through early intervention and healthy food choices for young children, their families, and childcare providers the burden of childhood obesity could be improved over time. Washington County Departments of Community Services (which licenses childcare facilities) and Public Health and Environment along with community partners will be able to further investigate the gap in services to reach young children and their families with policy, system, and environmental changes for healthy food programs and access.

Location: Other

Software used: ESRI ArcMap 10.1

Data used: US Census Block Group Data, American Community Survey, 2005-2010; Washington County Statewide Health Improvement Program 2011

Methods used: Trained childcare facilities were geocoded on a base map representing areas of the population identified at or below the MN poverty rate of 10.6% from the years 2005-2010.

Creator: Jean Streetar, Program Manager, Washington County, MN

Contact phone: 651-430-6786

Contact email: jean.streetar@co.washington.mn.us


Washington County, MN Physical Activity ResourcesWashington County, MN Physical Activity Resources

Click to download PDF [PDF-454K]

Abstract: This map illustrates the variety of fitness related resources available in Washington County, MN including community centers, clubs, fitness centers, classes, and parks and recreation department. More resources are located in areas of greater population density. The points located to the north and west of the county lines represent strong partnerships with multicounty school and healthcare partners. The northeast and southeast areas of the county are primarily rural or farming communities and show fewer resources. The Living Healthy in Washington County Resource and Referral Initiative is intended to build connections between community resources and healthcare partners to facilitate prevention counseling for patients at risk for obesity and tobacco related diseases, including heart disease, stroke, cancer, and diabetes. Through this initiative, healthcare providers are able to utilize community resource information when referring their patients to be more active, eat healthier, or reduce tobacco used and exposure. Mapping the resources will allow providers and patients alike to quickly identify the best resources for their needs.

Location: Other

Software used: ERSI ArcMap 10.1

Data used: Living Healthy in Washington County Resource Guide

Methods used: Physical activity resource in Washington County were identified and categorized in a database then geocoded so the GIS data could be displayed by type and location on the map.

Creator: Jean Streetar, Program Manager, Washington County, MN

Contact phone: 651-430-6786

Contact email: jean.streetar@co.washington.mn.us


Washington County, MN Nutrition ResourcesWashington County, MN Nutrition Resources

Click to download PDF [PDF-656K]

Abstract: This map illustrates nutrition resources available in Washington County, MN including cooking classes, nutrition counseling, and fresh produce resources such as farmers markets, community supported agriculture, and community gardens. Nutrition Support Resource include food shelves, home delivered meals, Women, Infants and Children (WIC), and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). The map shows that there are fewer fresh produce resources in the southwest corner of the county which is also a more densely populated and low income area. The absence of cooking classes in the northern part of the county is noted. Updates to the list and map will focus on these two categories to confirm gaps in services or identify new resources in these areas. The Living Healthy in Washington County Resource and Referral Initiative is intended to build connections between community resources and healthcare partners to facilitate prevention counseling for patients at risk for obesity and tobacco related diseased, including heart disease, stroke, cancer, and diabetes. Through this initiative, health care providers are able to utilize community resource information when referring their patients to be more active, eat healthier, or reduce tobacco use and exposure. Mapping the resource list will allow providers and patients alike to quickly identify the best resources for their needs.

Location: Other

Software used: ESRI ArcMap 10.1

Data used: Living Healthy in Washington County Resource Guide

Methods used: Nutrition resources in Washington County were identified and categorized in a database, then geocoded so the GIS data could be displayed by type and location on the map.

Creator: Jean Streetar, Program Manager, Washington County, MN

Contact phone: 651-430-6786

Contact email: jean.streetar@co.washington.mn.us


Heart Disease Deaths Kernel Density: Cities within Hennepin County, 2006-2010Heart Disease Deaths Kernel Density: Cities within Hennepin County, 2006-2010

Click to download PDF [PDF-460K]

Abstract: Heart Disease Deaths are depicted in Hennepin County, Minnesota, for the years 2006-2010. The kernel density approach aggregates deaths into geographic clusters. In this instance, deaths occurring at addresses within 15 meters of each other were aggregated. Kernel density mapping may enhance interpretation of the determinants of disease distribution in a given area. For example, in this map clustering of heart disease deaths is concordant with higher death rates depicted in a choropleth map (accompanying submission) in the cities of New Hope, Robbinsdale, St. Louis Park, and Spring Park. The clusters were almost entirely attributable to the presence of care facilities for the elderly in these municipalities. In contrast, kernel density “cold spots” like the City of Greenfield and Hassan Township in the far West of Hennepin County actually showed very high rates of heart disease deaths in the choropleth map because the few deaths occurring there did so against the backdrop of very low denominator populations. One could therefore argue – at least in this example - that the kernel density map was a better indicator of heart disease death activity than the more traditional choropleth map. To enhance interpretation of the determinants of heart disease death distribution in a given area.

Location: Other - Hennepin County, MN

Software used: ArcGIS 10

Data used: Minnesota Department of Health annual death files, 2006-2010; Hennepin County GIS boundary; 2010 US Census municipal boundaries

Methods used: The location of heart disease deaths was determined by geocoding address locations. The ArcGIS Kernel Density tool was used to calculate density of death addresses for Hennepin County. Output was a raster image with 150 meter cells displaying density using a neighborhood search radius of 1500 meters.

Creator: Jack Brondum, Epidemiologist, Hennepin County Human Services and Public Health Department (HSPHD)

Contact phone: (612) 543-5219

Contact email: Jack.Brondum@co.hennepin.mn.us


Age-adjusted Heart Disease Death Rate: Cities within Hennepin County, 2006-2010Age-adjusted Heart Disease Death Rate: Cities within Hennepin County, 2006-2010

Click to download PDF [PDF-393K]

Abstract: The age-adjusted heart disease death rate is shown by municipality in Hennepin County, Minnesota for the combined years 2006-2010, where the number of events was sufficient to calculate a death rate (n≥5). Where it was not possible to determine a rate, the municipality was colored gray. In this traditional choropleth depiction of disease burden, the more intensely red the color of the municipality, the higher the death rate due to heart disease. Color coding may enable health workers to identify trouble spots within their jurisdiction and to focus interventions on these areas. However, any such effort should be undertaken with the awareness that some rate estimates are quite unstable, given the small number of heart disease deaths occurring within certain municipalities. In practice, the comparatively small number of events in local jurisdictions often precludes further investigation of disease occurrence at higher “resolution”, e.g., census tract. As a result, trends or problem foci occurring at the sub-municipal level may go undetected. In the face of such small numbers it can be advantageous, or even crucial, to examine disease occurrence data from more than one perspective. For example, pairing this map with the accompanying Heart Disease Death Kernel Density map may provide a more comprehensive, better-rounded interpretation of the distribution of heart disease occurrence in a given area. To show the geographic variations in heart disease death occurrence; to inform local health department management, program staff, and relevant community groups and organizations of the burden of heart disease and to guide and monitor the focus of public health intervention.

Location: Other - Hennepin County, MN

Software used: ArcGIS 10

Data used: Minnesota Department of Health annual death files, 2006-2010; 2010 US Census municipal boundaries with populations

Methods used: The location of heart disease deaths was determined by geocoding address information and aggregating point locations to Hennepin County cities. Age-adjusted death rates were calculated for each municipality in the County and the Fort Snelling Territory using the death files for 2006-2010 from the Minnesota Department of Health and the 2000 US Standard Million Population. No death rate was calculated for any municipality in which fewer than five deaths occurred.

Creator: Jack Brondum, Epidemiologist, Hennepin County Human Services and Public Health Department (HSPHD)

Contact phone: (612) 543-5219

Contact email: Jack.Brondum@co.hennepin.mn.us


Chronic Disease Rates by Public Health District, MaineChronic Disease Rates by Public Health District, Maine

Click to download PDF [PDF-550K]

Abstract: This map shows areas of the state that have the largest chronic disease burden but first looking at individual chronic diseases and then combining them to highlight the public health districts in the state that seem to have a high burden for all or most chronic disease areas. The northeast portion of the state has the largest burden with the southern part of the state having the least burden. Specific chronic disease programs know which areas of the state they should be focusing more on but this map was a great way to show how the same areas are focus areas for many different chronic disease and prevention programs. This helps illustrate the need and purpose for chronic disease and prevention programs to be working more corroboratively to reach the populations most in need. This map has proven a good to to highlight our need for continued integration and collaboration.

Location: ME

Software used: ArcMap10

Data used: Maine Cancer Registry and Maine Inpatient Database

Methods used: Developed maps for five different chronic disease areas by Maine Public Health District. Then developed a summarizing map showing the overall score of a District, determined by the number of times the district falls into the highest or 2nd highest quartile for each of the five chronic diseases shown.

Creator: David Pied, Public Health Educator, Maine CDC

Contact phone: (207) 287-7108

Contact email: david.pied@maine.gov


Maine towns with Tobacco-Free Recreation AreasMaine Towns with Tobacco-Free Recreation Areas

Click to download PDF [PDF-3.1M]

Abstract: This map provides a visual of which Maine towns already have tobacco free recreation area policies and which do not. To be recognized as a tobacco free rec area the towns policy needs to meet the PTM requirements for a tobacco free policy. This map was produced to show the number of policies already in place and to be used as a tool to help encourage towns without a policy to develop one. We also plan to update this map over time to show progress and increase in the towns with tobacco free rec areas.

Location: ME

Software used: ArcMap10

Data used: Partnership for a Tobacco Free Maine - Tobacco Free Policy Data

Methods used: Used town level map of Maine. Identified towns with tobacco free rec policies, those without and those with populations likely too small to have a rec area.

Creator: David Pied, Public Health Educator, Maine CDC

Contact phone: (207) 287-7108

Contact email: david.pied@maine.gov

Related links: http://www.tobaccofreemaine.org/channels/communities/tobacco_free_community_recreation.php


The President's Network Worksite Health Initiative, Reach and Impact, 2010-2011The President's Network Worksite Health Initiative, Reach and Impact, 2010-2011

Click to download PDF [PDF-748K]

Abstract: This map highlights the widespread and broad impact of the President's Network Worksite Health Initiative, which seeks to engage CEOs and business leaders in small and mid-size corporations in Minnesota communities in enhancing or implementing worksite health and wellness activities. This initiative engages local chambers of commerce and business leaders through roundtable events in their local communities. These roundtables are designed to engage leadership to be thought leaders, role models and advocates for new and better health care policies and programs within their companies and communities. The roundtables also provide essential tools, resources and best practices to senior leadership to help them make Minnesota the healthiest state in the union in which to work and live. Business leaders are given new tools and other resources to help them guide their organizations to more effective programs and policies relative to their health initiatives. This map demonstrates the potentially deep impact in communities with high participation in the President's Network worksite wellness initiative. It also demonstrates the broad impact of this initiative across multiple Minnesota communities, and highlights regions of the state to target in future roundtables during 2012.

Location: MN

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3.1; Adobe Illustrator CS5

Data used: Quarterly Census of Employment & Wages, Minnesota Department of Employment & Economic Development; Survey data collected by the President's Network and the Minnesota Department of Health

Methods used: Bivariate mapping with proportional circles representing the total number of individuals employed by the companies and organizations taking part in the President's Network Worksite Health Initiative and the color representing the total number of employed persons in each community potentially impacted by this initiative. The proportion of total employment in each community was determined by dividing the total employment covered by participating organizations in each community by the total yearly average employment (2010 or 2011) reported in the Quarterly Census of Employment & Wages by the Minnesota Department of Employment & Economic Development.

Creator: James Peacock, Epidemiologist Senior, Minnesota Department of Health

Contact phone: (651) 201-5405

Contact email: james.peacock@state.mn.us


Minnesota Stroke Registry Hospital Service Areas and Population Distribution, 2012Minnesota Stroke Registry Hospital Service Areas and Population Distribution, 2012

Click to download PDF [PDF-1.1M]

Abstract: The 2010 Census population distribution of Minnesota is shown along with the hospital service areas for Minnesota Stroke Registry hospitals participating in the program as of February 2012. Using these data, 71% of Minnesotans reside in the hospital service areas of facilities that are actively engaged in a coordinated quality improvement program for acute stroke. This map is used to demonstrate the statewide impact of the Minnesota Stroke Registry program by highlighting the locations of participating hospitals and the communities that they serve. It underscores the growth of the registry program, which started in 2008 with 13 hospitals in the Twin Cities and Rochester, to dozens more hospitals from all regions of the state. It is shared as part of most presentations that provide an overview of the program and its activities. The map also provides visual representation of the reach and impact of the program for CDC and other participating states.

Location: MN

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3.1; Adobe Illustrator CS5

Data used: Hospital Service Areas, Dartmouth Health Atlas, 2009; 2010 US Census Redistricting Data P.L. 94-171

Methods used: The 2009 Hospital Service Areas delineated in the Dartmouth Health Atlas were visualized for each hospital participating in the Minnesota Stroke Registry, a CDC Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke Registry Program, as of February 2012 by the green shading. Under this shading is the population distribution of Minnesota from the 2010 Census, with each dot representing 250 individuals. The population density is shown by census tract, but the tract borders have been removed in favor of county boundaries. The sum of the population in the Hospital Service Areas is included under the legend.

Creator: ames Peacock, Epidemiologist Senior, Minnesota Department of Health

Contact phone: (651) 201-5405

Contact email: james.peacock@state.mn.us

Related links: http://www.mnstrokeregistry.org


Geographic Analysis of Drive Time to Certified Stroke Centers in the Tri-State Stroke Network Region (South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia) Geographic Analysis of Drive Time to Certified Stroke Centers in the Tri-State Stroke Network Region (South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia)

Click to download PDF [PDF-3M]

Abstract: Timely access to facilities that provide acute stroke care is necessary to reduce disabilities and death from stroke. We examined geographic and sociodemographic disparities in drive times to Joint Commission–certified primary stroke centers (JCPSCs) and other hospitals with stroke care quality improvement initiatives in the tri-state region of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. We found substantial geographic and sociodemographic disparities in drive times. Overall, approximately 55% of the population in the tri-state region lived within a 30-minute drive time to a JCPSC and 77% lived within a 60-minute drive time. For 30-minute and 60-minute drive times, people in younger age groups, with higher education levels, living in urban areas, and not living in poverty had more timely access to a JCPSC. When hospitals currently engaged in stroke care quality improvement initiatives (ie, the PCNASR and GWTG–Stroke hospitals) were included in the analysis, we observed substantial increases in percentage of the population within 30-minute and 60-minute drive times, suggesting that these hospitals are well located to serve populations that do not have timely access to JCSPCs. These results highlight opportunities to strengthen stroke systems of care by including hospitals that may not meet the criteria for designation as a JCPSC but have the potential to provide acute stroke treatment services.

These results highlight opportunities to strengthen stroke systems of care by including hospitals that may not meet the criteria for designation as a JCPSC but have the potential to provide acute stroke treatment services. The 2 main avenues for expanding the role of these hospitals are 1) establishment of an additional set of evidence-based criteria for acute stroke treatment center designation that complements but does not replace the JCPSC criteria (not unlike the multilevel trauma center designation) and 2) enhancement of telestroke networks.

An additional set of evidence-based stroke center criteria to complement the existing JCPSC criteria would enhance stroke systems of care by recognizing the vital role that smaller hospitals fill in treating stroke patients, especially in rural areas such as those in the tri-state region of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program is 1 example of an additional stroke center certification program that has certified 13 primary stroke centers nationwide (www.hfap.org/AccreditationPrograms/acute.aspx).

Location: GA

Software used: ESRI Network Analyst 9.3 and SAS

Data used: StreetMap Pro 2007, US Census 2000, hospitals certified as JCPSCs as of September 27, 2010, Paul Coverdell PCNASR or Get With The Guidelines participants

Methods used: Using Network Analyst 9.3 and StreetMap Pro 2007, we generated 30 and 60 minute drive times from hospitals. We estimated the demographic characteristics (race, ethnicity, urban-rural, poverty) residing within the drive time areas by extrapolating from the areal proportion of census tracks within each drive time. We performed χ2 analyses using SAS version 9.1 (SAS Institute, Inc, Cary, North Carolina).

Creator: Ishmael Williams, GIS Analyst, CDC Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

Contact phone: (770) 488-8060

Contact email: ibw1@cdc.gov

Related links: http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2011/jul/10_0178.htm


Shaping Positive Lifestyles and Attitudes through School Health (SPLASH) Regional Coordinating Sites 2011-2012 Shaping Positive Lifestyles and Attitudes through School Health (SPLASH) Regional Coordinating Sites 2011—2012

Click to download PDF [PDF-108K]

Abstract: SPLASH regions, displayed with counties and table identifying regions by number, for 2011-2012. Use for program purposes by SPLASH

Location: MI

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3

Data used: SPLASH project data

Methods used: Use GIS layer for state counties, manually create SPLASH regions, mostly multicounty, to display reach of the Shaping Positive Lifestyles & Attitudes through School Health program. Use gray scale design as requested since material will black and white.

Creator: Henry L Miller, Departmental Specialist, Michigan Department of Community Health

Contact phone: (517) 335-8779

Contact email: millerhenry@michigan.gov


Travel time to accredited stroke centers in East Tennessee Appalachian Region. Reprinted from Annals of Epidemiology Vol 20 Issue 12, Investigation of Disparities in Geographic Accessibility to Emergency Stroke and Myocardial Infarction in East Tennessee Using Geographical Information Systems and Network Analysis, 924-930 (2010), with permission from Elsevier Travel time to accredited stroke centers in East Tennessee Appalachian Region. Reprinted from Annals of Epidemiology Vol 20 Issue 12, Investigation of Disparities in Geographic Accessibility to Emergency Stroke and Myocardial Infarction in East Tennessee Using Geographical Information Systems and Network Analysis, 924-930 (2010), with permission from Elsevier

Click to download PDF [PDF-359K]

Abstract: The map shows travel times, from different neighborhoods in East Tennessee Appalachian Region, to the nearest stroke centers. Stroke requires time sensitive treatment and therefore travel time to care is critical for good health outcomes. Darkest shaded areas are neighborhoods that had access to stroke centers within 30 minutes, lighter shaded areas had access within 60 minutes while the very light shaded areas had access within 90 minutes. Most of the areas that had long travels time to stroke centers were neighborhoods in the rural areas. The map was generated to investigate and identify neighborhood disparities in travel time (geographic accessibility) to emergency stroke care. It shows that important disparities in geographic accessibility to stroke care exist in East Tennessee Appalachian Region and this may have significant implications for health outcomes related to stroke.

Location: TN

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3 ESRI, Network Analyst Extension of ArcGIS ESRI

Data used: StreetMap USA

Methods used: Network Analysis

Creator: Ashley S. Pedigo, Assistant Professor, University of Tennessee

Contact phone: 865-974-5568

Contact email: aodoi@utk.edu


Travel For Surgical Breast Cancer Treatment (Excludes Lumpectomy) In Montana Travel For Surgical Breast Cancer Treatment (Excludes Lumpectomy) In Montana

Click to download PDF [PDF-212K]

Abstract: Travel for breast cancer surgery at selected Montana cities. We wanted to know how Montanans tend to travel for cancer treatment. For each Montanan receiving treatment in Montana for a diagnosis of breast cancer, a line from the Montanan’s residence to the city where the individual receives treatment is mapped and drawn. Most Montanans choose to receive treatment in six cities: Billings, Bozeman, Great Falls, Helena, Kalispell, and Missoula.

Location: MT

Software used: R Development Core Team (2009). R: A language and environment for statistical computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria. ISBN 3-900051-07-0, URL http://www.R-project.org.

Data used: Residence – Montana Central Cancer Tumor Registry, Shapefiles – Montana National Resource Information System

Methods used: Street addresses were geocoded using an internet based geocoder. The sp and rgdal packages were used for spatial transformations and manipulations, and RColorBrewer was used to create the color scheme for the legend.

Creator: Cody L. Custis, Epidemiologist, Montana DPHHS

Contact phone: 406 444 6947

Contact email: ccustis@mt.gov


30, 60, and 90 minute drive times to current and projected telestroke sites, Montana 2010 30, 60, and 90 minute drive times to current and projected telestroke sites, Montana 2010

Click to download PDF [PDF-989K]

Abstract: Developed in collaboration with the Montana Stroke Workgroup, this map illustrates the location of Montana's stroke centers and drive time to current and projected telestroke sites that use the Stroke-Doc system. This map will be used when working with stroke partners to identify telestroke locations to improve stroke systems of care in Montana's rural areas. Through a 2-way interactive telestroke system, the Montana Cardiovascular Health Program and the Stroke Workgroup have improved the capacity of rural hospitals to conduct stroke consults with neurologists from stroke centers.

Location: MT

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3.1

Data used: Location of Stroke Centers and Telestroke sites were identified by the Montana Stroke Workgroup.

Methods used: Network Analyst was used to determine drive times.

Creator: Carrie Oser, Epidemiologist, Montana Department of Health and Human Services

Contact phone: (404) 444-4002

Contact email: coser@mt.gov


Female Breast Cancer Incidence Rates by State, 2007 Female Breast Cancer Incidence Rates by State, 2007

Click to download PDF [PDF-522K]

Abstract: In this map, female breast cancer incidence rates by state are displayed for diagnosis year 2007. The U.S. states are divided into groups based on the rates at which women developed breast cancer in 2007. The rates are the numbers out of 100,000 women who developed breast cancer each year. To study variations in the risk of getting breast cancer from state to state for diagnosis year 2007.

Location: USA

Software used: Manually created

Data used: United States Cancer Statistics: 1999–2007 Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report; 2010.

Methods used: Rates per 100,000 women, age-adjusted to 2000 U.S. standard population.

Creator: Simple Singh, Epidemiologist, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact phone: 770-488-4292

Contact email: sdsingh@cdc.gov


Prostate Cancer Incidence Rates by State, 2007 Prostate Cancer Incidence Rates by State, 2007

Click to download PDF [PDF-169K]

Abstract: In this map, Prostate cancer incidence rates by state are displayed for diagnosis year 2007. The U.S. states are divided into groups based on the rates at which men developed prostate cancer in 2007. The rates are the numbers out of 100,000 men who developed prostate cancer each year. To study variations in the risk of getting prostate cancer from state to state for diagnosis year 2007.

Location: USA

Software used: Manually created.

Data used: United States Cancer Statistics: 1999–2007 Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report; 2010.

Methods used: Rates per 100,000 men, age-adjusted to 2000 U.S. standard population.

Creator: Simple Singh, Epidemiologist, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact phone: (770) 488-4292

Contact email: sdsingh@cdc.gov

Related links: http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/prostate/statistics/state.htm http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/DCPC_INCA/DCPC_INCA.aspx


This map was part of an exploratory study that used cartograms and other cartographic techniques to visually communicate the pattern of obesity prevalence. To visually communicate the pattern of obesity prevalence. Obesity Prevalence 2006

Click to download PDF [PDF-110K]

Abstract: This map was part of an exploratory study that used cartograms and other cartographic techniques to visually communicate the pattern of obesity prevalence. To visually communicate the pattern of obesity prevalence.

Location: USA

Software used: ArcInfo Workstation, ArcGIS, Gastner-Newman cartogram program

Data used: Obesity Prevalence

Methods used: Gastner-Newman cartogram

Creator: James B. Holt, Team Leader, Analytic Methods, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact phone: (770) 488-5510

Contact email: jgh4@cdc.gov

Related links: Am J Public Health. 2009 February; 99(2): 308–312.


Colorectal Cancer Incidence Rates, by State, 2007 Colorectal Cancer Incidence Rates, by State, 2007

Click to download PDF [PDF-184K

Abstract: In this map, colorectal cancer incidence rates by state are displayed for diagnosis year 2007. The U.S. states are divided into groups based on the rates at which people developed colorectal cancer in 2007. The rates are the numbers out of 100,000 people who developed colorectal cancer each year. To study variations in the risk of getting colorectal cancer from state to state for diagnosis year 2007.

Location: USA

Software used: Manually created.

Data used: United States Cancer Statistics: 1999-2007 Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report; 2010.

Methods used: Rates per 100,000 and age-adjusted to 2000 U.S. standard population.

Creator: Simple Singh, Epidemiologist, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact phone: (770) 488-4292

Contact email: sdsingh@cdc.gov

Related links: http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/colorectal/statistics/state.htm http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/DCPC_INCA/DCPC_INCA.aspx


Spatial Concentrations and Outliers of Poverty, United States, 1999 Spatial Concentrations and Outliers of Poverty, United States, 1999

Click to download PDF [PDF-214K]

Abstract: This map depicts areas of geographically concentrated high and low poverty as well as counties that were statistical outliers for poverty, in the US, for 1999. To better depict the spatial concentration of poverty, at the county-level, for the US.

Location: USA

Software used: ArcGIS

Data used: 2000 SF-3 Long Form Census Data

Methods used: Local Moran's I combined with statistical categorization of poverty

Creator: James B. Holt, Team Leader, Analytic Methods, CDC

Contact phone: (770) 488-5510

Contact email: jgh4@cdc.gov

Related links: http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2007/oct/07_0091.htm


Anemia among Children on Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) by Zip Codes, Shelby County, Tennessee, 2003-2008 Anemia among Children on Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) by Zip Codes, Shelby County, Tennessee, 2003-2008

Click to download PDF [PDF-163K]

Abstract:

  • Between the years 2003 to 2008, the rate of anemia among WIC children in Shelby County ranged from 17.5% in 2005 to 22.4% in 2007.
  • The anemia rate for individual zip codes ranged from 3.6% for zip code 38017 in 2003 to 50% for zip code 38126 in 2004.
  • The highest anemia rates tended to occur in and around downtown Memphis and south of downtown. Lower rates tended to be observed in the suburban and rural areas east and north of downtown.
  • In general, geographic variations in anemia rates are consistent from year to year.
  • The anemia rates for certain zip codes show fluctuations over time. GIS maps by zip codes help visualize geographical disparities in anemia rates among WIC enrollees in Shelby County. They also help identify zip code areas with relatively higher or lower anemia rates.

Location: TN

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3; SAS 9.1

Data used: The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)

Methods used: This study presents anemia rates among WIC enrollees aged 9 months and older in Shelby County by zip code area and year. Anemia is defined as hemoglobin levels of less than 11 mg/dl. We analyzed the most recent hemoglobin measurement for each child enrolled in WIC for each of the years from 2003 – 2008 to determine the rate of anemia for each zip code area.

Each enrollee’s resident address was geocoded to determine zip code location. Rates for zip code areas with less than 50 WIC enrollees were suppressed due to concerns about statistical reliability. We used ArcInfo version 9.3 to produce all maps.

Creator: Yinmei Li, Director, Surveillance, Epidemiology & Evaluation, Tennessee Department of Health

Contact phone: 615-741-8190

Contact email: yinmei.li@tn.gov


Michigan Unemployment Rates by County, September 2010 Michigan Unemployment Rates by County, September 2010

Click to download PDF [PDF-120K]

Abstract: Map displays unemployment rates in Michigan, using a green, yellow, red mix to highlight the dangerously high level of unemployment, reinforced by the time line chart showing Michigan unemployment substantially higher than national, and the highest in years. Document unemployment rates in state by county. Use as part of the social determinants of health risk factors in constructing burden of disease documents and presentations.

Location: MI

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3

Data used: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Chart made using Google online tool.

Methods used: Use GIS layer for state counties, Google tool for time series chart comparing U.S. to Michigan unemployment.

Creator: Henry L Miller, Departmental Specialist, Michigan Department of Community Health

Contact phone: (517) 335-8779

Contact email: millerhenry@michigan.gov


Years of Potential Life Lost from Stroke, Michigan, 2004-2008; using age 65 standard; by County Years of Potential Life Lost from Stroke, Michigan, 2004-2008; using age 65 standard; by County

Click to download PDF [PDF-94K]

Abstract: Map of Michigan, by county, displaying four levels of Years of Potential Life Lost, five years aggregated data. Purpose is to document the stroke burden in terms of YPLL using age 65 standard.

Location: MI

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3 and SAS 9.2

Data used: 2004 to 2008 Michigan Death Files, Vital Records and Health Data Development Section, MDCH

Methods used:SAS used to develop county level table with YPLL rates. ArcGIS used to turn tables into Michigan county level map displaying four levels of rates. Rate suppressed where cases less than five per county.

Creator: Henry L Miller, Departmental Specialist, Michigan Department of Community Health

Contact phone: (517) 335-8779

Contact email: millerhenry@michigan.gov


Hospitals and Local Health Departments Michigan's Upper Peninsula, 2010 Hospitals and Local Health Departments Michigan's Upper Peninsula, 2010

Click to download PDF [PDF-176K]

Abstract: Map of Upper Peninsula, Michigan, showing hospitals by local health department, to document hospital coverage by geographic area. Display hospital coverage in a state area challenged by patients' lack of timely access to hospitals. For example, there is only one hospital there that offers cardiac cathertization and is a primary stroke care center - Marquette General Health System.

Location: MI

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3

Data used: Table of hospitals in Upper Peninsula, Michigan, with addresses, for geocoding.

Methods used: Geocoded addresses online using batchgeo.com. Selected Upper Peninsula local health departments from GIS layer. Added insert map of Michigan by counties to show relationship to Upper Peninsula area.

Creator: Henry L Miller, Departmental Specialist, Michigan Department of Community Health

Contact phone: (517) 335-8779

Contact email: millerhenry@michigan.gov


States With Laws on Competitive* Foods in Schools States With Laws on Competitive* Foods in Schools

Click to download PDF [PDF-124K]

Abstract: Map of U. S. showing states with competitive foods laws, includes Hawaii and Alaska as small inserts, a description of competitive food, and uses the title as the legend by inserting a colored square Inform policy. Map shows that many states have such laws, yet Michigan is not yet one of them. It also shows that there are strong geographic clustering of areas with laws, for example, most of the eastern seaboard states.

Location: USA

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3

Data used: List of states with laws on competitive foods in schools

Methods used: Using ArcGIS turn table list into easily visualized map of US identifying states with laws.

Creator: Henry L Miller, Departmental Specialist, Michigan Department of Community Health

Contact phone: (517) 335-8779

Contact email: millerhenry@michigan.gov


Marquette and Menominee Delta Local Health Departments, Michigan 2010 Social Determinants of Health Marquette and Menominee Delta Local Health Departments, Michigan 2010 Social Determinants of Health

Click to download PDF [PDF-80K]

Abstract: Social determinants of health data displayed in three similar maps, in one 8" by 11" page, for easy comparison; using the Edward Tufte recommendation to use 'small multiples' in map display Document area with above average rates of lack of health care coverage, poverty, and unemployment, within the State of Michigan, to support a grant application

Location: MI

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3

Data used: Michigan BRFS 2006-2008 - health care coverage; U.S. Census Bureau - poverty rates; U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics - unemployment rates

Methods used: Use GIS layer for state counties; display geographic area by counties and by local health departments to show various rates by the geographic area rather that isolate in tables. Display location of area within overall state with insert map.

Creator: Henry L Miller, Departmental Specialist, Michigan Department of Community Health

Contact phone: (517) 335-8779

Contact email: millerhenry@michigan.gov


Local Health Department, FQHC and Safety Net Primary Care Sites, Tennessee Department of Health, Jan. 2010 Local Health Department, FQHC and Safety Net Primary Care Sites, Tennessee Department of Health, Jan. 2010

Click to download PDF [PDF-142K]

Abstract: To visualize the location and 30-mile radius coverage of primary care sites in Tennessee.

Location: TN

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3

Data used: Tennessee Department of Health

Methods used: Each facility location was geo-coded and mapped. A 30-mile radius area was generated around each facility.

Creator: Yinmei Li, Director, Surveillance, Epidemiology & Evaluation, Tennessee Department of Health

Contact phone: (615) 741-8190

Contact email: yinmei.li@tn.gov


Age-adjusted five-year hospitalization rates for coronary heart disease patients, by county of residence, Michigan, 2004 to 2008 Age-adjusted five-year hospitalization rates for coronary heart disease patients, by county of residence, Michigan, 2004 to 2008

Click to download PDF [PDF-73K]

Abstract: Map of Michigan, by county, displaying four levels of coronary heart disease age-adjusted five-year hospitalization rates, by patients' county of residence. A five county area with high cardiovascular disease rates has been outlined. Purpose is to document the higher disease burden within the five county area.

Location: MI

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3 and SAS 9.1

Data used: 2004 to 2008 Michigan Resident Inpatient Files, Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics, MDCH

Methods used: SAS used to develop county level table with hospitalization rates - Excel spreadsheet formulas used to age adjust to 2000 U.S. standard population. Excel tables converted to DBF. ArcGIS used to turn DBF tables into Michigan county level map displaying four levels of rates and outlining a five county cluster for further study and potential public health intervention.

Creator: Henry L Miller, Departmental Specialist, Michigan Department of Community Health

Contact phone: (517) 335-8779

Contact email: millerhenry@michigan.gov


Diseases of the Heart Mortality Rate by U.S. Congressional District, Tennessee 2005-2007 Diseases of the Heart Mortality Rate by U.S. Congressional District, Tennessee 2005-2007

Click to download PDF [PDF-139K]

Abstract: Age-adjusted mortality rate for heart disease varies by U.S. congressional districts for total population as well as by gender or race groups. The heart disease mortality rate is higher among African Americans than among white and higher among men than among women. These maps help visualize variations of heart disease mortality rates among U.S. Congressional Districts and among racial and gender groups in Tennessee.

Location: TN

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3; SAS 9.1

Data used: Tennessee Death Statistical System 2005-2007; U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Population

Methods used: Age-adjusted mortality rates were calculated from the 2005-2007 Death Statistical System provided by the Tennessee Department of Health, Division of Health Statistics. Data were for Tennessee residents with underlying cause of death recorded as diseases of the heart (ICD10 codes of I00-I09, I11, I13, I20-I51). Because 2005-2007 population data by U.S. congressional districts were unavailable, 2000 population data were used instead as the denominators to calculate mortality rates. As a result, the rates are in general higher than the actual mortality rates in the population. Resident addresses were geocoded to determine congressional districts. 99.96% records were able to be successfully geocoded. Rates were age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population using the direct method. Race classifications of “white” and “African American” refer to individuals regardless of Hispanic origin. In some districts, mortality rates for African Americans were based on relatively small numbers of deaths. These results should be interpreted with caution.

Creator: Yinmei Li, Director, Surveillance, Epidemiology & Evaluation, Tennessee Department of Health

Contact phone: (615) 741-8190

Contact email: yinmei.li@tn.gov

Related links: hit.state.tn.us/maps.aspx


Diseases of the Heart Mortality Rate by Senate District, Tennessee 2005-2007 Diseases of the Heart Mortality Rate by Senate District, Tennessee 2005-2007

Click to download PDF [PDF-372K]

Abstract: Age-adjusted mortality rate for heart disease varies by senate districts for total population as well as by gender or race groups. The heart disease mortality rate is higher among African Americans than among white and higher among men than among women.

Location: TN

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3; SAS 9.1

Data used: Tennessee Death Statistical System 2005-2007; U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Population

Methods used: Age-adjusted mortality rates were calculated from the 2005-2007 Death Statistical System provided by the Tennessee Department of Health, Division of Health Statistics. Data were for Tennessee residents with underlying cause of death recorded as diabetes (E10-E14). Because 2005-2007 population data by senate legislative districts were unavailable, 2000 population data were used instead as the denominators to calculate mortality rates. As a result, the rates are in general higher than the actual mortality rates in the population. Resident addresses were geocoded to determine senate districts for urban residents, while resident county was used to determine senate districts for rural residents. 99.96% records were able to be successfully geocoded. Rates were age-adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population using the direct method. Race classifications of “white” and “African American” refer to individuals regardless of Hispanic origin. In some districts, mortality rates for African Americans were based on relatively small numbers of deaths. These results should be interpreted with caution.

Creator: Yinmei Li, Director, Surveillance, Epidemiology & Evaluation, Tennessee Department of Health

Contact phone: (615) 741-8190

Contact email: yinmei.li@tn.gov

Related links: hit.state.tn.us/maps.aspx


Five-year Total Deaths for Cardiovascular Disease by County, Michigan, 2004 to 2008 Five-year Total Deaths for Cardiovascular Disease by County, Michigan, 2004 to 2008

Click to download PDF [PDF-74K]

Abstract: Map of Michigan, by county, displaying total number of cardiovascular disease deaths, over a five-year period, by county. Purpose is to display data a different way - rate maps do not identify where the most cases are, just where the higher rates are. Thus number maps can be added to rate maps to give a more balanced view of the disease burden. Purpose is to document the disease burden by total numbers, thus suggesting where more people can be reached in potential public health interventions.

Location: MI

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3 and SAS 9.1

Data used: 2004 to 2008 Death Files, Vital Records and Health Data Section, MDCH

Methods used: SAS used to develop county level table with death numbers. ArcGIS used to create proportional disc symbols to overlay map with Michigan counties.

Creator: Henry L Miller, Departmental Specialist, Michigan Department of Community Health

Contact phone: (517) 335-8779

Contact email: millerhenry@michigan.gov


Complete Streets Policy Initiatives Michigan, August 2010 Complete Streets Policy Initiatives Michigan, August 2010

Click to download PDF [PDF-169K]

Abstract: Three levels of policy - resolutions, ordinances, and non-motorized plans - are displayed by four types of jurisdictions - cities, townships, counties, and regions Document areas with and without policy initiatives; display reach of Complete Streets project

Location: MI

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3

Data used: Complete Streets project data

Methods used: Use GIS layers for state counties, townships, cities to display geographic reach of policy initiatives

Creator: Henry L Miller, Departmental Specialist, Michigan Department of Community Health

Contact phone: (517) 335-8779

Contact email: millerhenry@michigan.gov


Drive Times to Primary Stroke Centers and Minnesota Population Distribution, 2010 Drive Times to Primary Stroke Centers and Minnesota Population Distribution, 2010

Click to download PDF [PDF-173K]

Abstract: The 2010 Census population distribution of Minnesota is shown along with the 30- and 60-minute drive time polygons around 19 Primary Stroke Centers (PSC) serving the state. Using these data, 55% of Minnesotans live within 30 minutes and 70% live within 60 minutes of a PSC. As of December 2010, the 14 PSCs in Minnesota were in the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area or in Rochester; 5 additional PSCs were in border locations of neighboring states. Population clusters in the major cities (Duluth, St. Cloud, and Mankato) and the many regional towns of outstate Minnesota are visible both within and outside the 60-minute drive time polygons to a PSC. Additional maps in this series show the distribution of population by race, ethnicity, and age. This map illustrates the need for a statewide strategy to improve and increase capacity to treat stroke at all hospitals in the state of Minnesota. Additional maps highlighting access to hospitals with specific capacities, such as the presence of a stroke team in the ED, access to telemedicine consults, the presence of stroke unit care, and rehabilitation services, will further inform this planning process.

Location: MN

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3.1

Data used: 2010 US Census Redistricting Data P.L. 94-171; Primary Stroke Centers as certified by the Joint Commission in December 2010

Methods used:30 minute and 60 minute drive time polygons were created around the 19 Primary Stroke Centers (14 in Minnesota, 2 in South Dakota, and 1 each in Iowa, North Dakota, and Wisconsin) that typically provide care for Minnesota residents who have a stroke. Under these drive time polygons is a dot density map showing the population distribution of Minnesota from the 2010 Census, with each dot representing 250 individuals. The population density is shown by census tract, but the tract borders have been removed in favor of county boundaries. The sum of the population in tracts located within the 30- and 60-minute drive time polygons is included under the legend.

Creator: James Peacock, Epidemiologist Senior, Minnesota Department of Health

Contact phone: (651) 201-5405

Contact email: james.peacock@state.mn.us


Arkansas EMS Agency Personnel Types Arkansas EMS Agency Personnel Types

Click to download PDF [PDF-145K]

Abstract: Pie charts were used to represent EMT personnel by type and placed at centroid of zip code; they were overlayed on choropleth map of county-level population size. In general, the spatial distribution of the agencies shows a random pattern, but the total number of personnel by agency appears to vary slightly by location and county population size. The purpose of this map was to display approximate locations of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) agencies and total number of personnel employed at each agency in order to show EMS capacity by location. This map was provided to state EMS directors and other EMS partners to help inform them on EMS capacity to respond to acute cardiovascular events.

Location: AR

Software used: ArcGIS 9.2

Data used: Data are from EMS Survey conducted in 2008

Methods used: Choropleth map with pie charts placed at zip code centroid

Creator: Sophia Greer, Epidemiologist, CDC

Contact phone: (770) 488-5467

Contact email: fgz3@cdc.gov


Heart Disease Mortality, Age Adjusted Rates by County, 1995 through 2009 Heart Disease Mortality, Age Adjusted Rates by County, 1995 through 2009

Click to download PDF [PDF-182K]

Abstract: Age adjusted heart disease mortality rates by Minnesota county are shown in three 5-year time periods from 1995 through 2009. The quartile cutpoints are held constant across all three 5-year time periods to show both the ranking of counties within time periods, and also the county-specific and statewide decline in heart disease mortality over the 15 year time period. The 10 counties with the highest rates in each time period are highlighted in yellow to identify those counties with persistently high mortality. The overall rate for the state and the total number of deaths are shown under each map. This map was included in Heart Disease & Stroke in Minnesota: 2011 Burden Report, published in Spring 2011.

Location: MN

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3.1

Data used: Mortality Data from the Minnesota Department of Health Center for Health Statistics

Methods used: County level mortality data are compiled in three 5-year time periods in order to provide enough cases in small population counties to produce a rate. Age-adjusted rates (2000 US Standard Population) for all counties across all time periods are ranked into quartiles, with those quartile cutpoints held constant across the three time periods. This allows the viewer to see both the relative ranking of each county within each time period, but follow the general decline across all counties over the time period. The 10 counties with the highest rates in each time period are highlighted in yellow to help identify counties with persistently high mortality.

Creator: James Peacock, Epidemiologist Senior, Minnesota Department of Health

Contact phone: (651) 201-5405

Contact email: james.peacock@state.mn.us


Spatial Variations in Health Insurance Coverage for Lower Income Population in Georgia Counties, 2006 Spatial Variations in Health Insurance Coverage for Lower Income Population in Georgia Counties, 2006

Click to download PDF [PDF-671K]

Abstract: In 2006, 15.8% of U.S. residents did not have health insurance. The percentage was higher in Georgia (17.6%). Those near or below poverty have higher rates of non-insurance compared to the general population. For the under 65 population who are at or below 200% poverty, one large cluster of high non-insurance rates appears in north Georgia, extending from the north side of the Atlanta metro area to the TN-NC-GA border. Two smaller clusters of low non-insurance rates appear in east-central and southwest Georgia. Health disparities are observed in areas with high levels of non-insurance, especially amongst those with lower incomes. Findings here inform policy makers of areas with high levels of non-insured amongst lower income populations, clarifying descriptive statistics by documenting clusters of similar non-insurance rates.

Location: GA

Software used: Arc GIS 9.3, Geoda 0.95i

Data used: U.S. Census Bureau Small Area Health Insurance Estimates (SAHIE), 2006

Methods used: Uni-variate Local Indicators of Spatial Autocorrelation (LISA) with a Queens Weight matrix; counties with statistically significant correlations mapped.

Creator: Todd Matthews, Assistant Dean, College of Social Sciences and Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of West Georgia

Contact phone: (678) 839-6325

Contact email: tmatthew@westga.edu


Food Deserts in Texas; 2005 and Social Impacts Food Deserts in Texas; 2005 and Social Impacts

Click to download PDF [PDF-162K]

Abstract: Of Texas' 258 counties, 58 counties are considered Food Deserts according to the USDA definition and criteria. The criteria include lack of availability of fresh produce and limited or no presence of large grocery stores (stores with 4 or more employees) . The areas identified as Food Deserts were further analyzed based on health rankings, population below 4000, and socio-economic rankings. Counties were displayed in subsequent maps based on negative impact of the examined social criteria and their position as a Food Desert. Finally, counties that exhibited negative social impact based on all examined categories and designated as Food Deserts were identified. There are several areas within the United States that meet the USDA criteria and have been identified as Food Deserts. Texas was chosen for analysis based on its large area, varied topography, representation of a full spectrum of income levels and diverse ethnic presence. Further analysis is warranted to determine the impact of available public transportation, fast food chains, ethnic pockets, land use and hydrological analysis and climate and weather patterns before making any meaningful assessments and conclusions.

Location: TX

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3.1

Data used: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; Landsat 7; Albers Equal Area Projection

Methods used: Subsetting; Chloropleth; Remote Sensing

Creator: Crystal Guest; Brittany Bailey; Michelle Cash, Students in the Environmental Spatial Analysis, Environmental Studies majors, Gainesville State College

Contact phone: (678) 524-7435

Contact email: 924185249@gsc.edu


2007 Estimates of the Percentage of Adults with Diagnosed Diabetes 2007 Estimates of the Percentage of Adults with Diagnosed Diabetes

Click to download PDF [PDF-383K]

Abstract: The map shows crude rates of diagnosed diabetes among adults at least 20 years of age. The map shows counties with the highest diagnosed diabetes rates are located primarily in the Southeast. This map was created as part of a series of maps displayed on the Division of Diabetes Translation web site showing rates of diagnosed diabetes and related risk factors. County-level maps for each state are also available on the web site. These maps document the geographic disparities that exist in diagnosed diabetes across the United States. They are intended to be used to inform policy makers and researchers about the disproportionate geographic burden of diagnosed diabetes in the U.S. To map the burden of diabetes. Findings are reported in Gregg EW, Kirtland KA, Cadwell BL, Burrows NR, Barker LE, Thompson TJ, Geiss LS, Pan L. Estimated county-level prevalence of diabetes and obesity – United States, 2007. MMWR 2209;58(45):1259-1263.

Location: USA

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3, ESRI

Data used: Center's for Disease Control and Prevention Behaviorial Risk Factor Surveillance System, and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates

Methods used: The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes by county was estimated using data from CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Population Estimates Program.1 The BRFSS provided state-specific information on behavioral risk factors and preventive health practices. Respondents were considered to have diabetes if they responded "yes" to the question, "Has a doctor ever told you that you have diabetes?" Women who indicated that they only had diabetes during pregnancy were not considered to have diabetes. Three years of data were used to improve the precision of the year-specific county-level estimates of diagnosed diabetes estimates. Estimates were restricted to adults 20 years of age or older to be consistent with population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau, which provides year-specific county population estimates by demographic characteristics. The county-level estimates for the 3,141 counties or county equivalents in the 50 U.S., states and the District of Columbia were based on indirect model-dependent estimates. The model-dependent approach employed a statistical model that “borrows strength” in making an estimate for one county from BRFSS data collected in other counties. Bayesian multilevel modeling techniques were used to obtain estimates. Separate models were developed for each of the four census regions: West, Midwest, Northeast and South. Multilevel Poisson regression models with random effects of demographic variables (age 20–44, 45–64, 65+; race; sex) at the county-level were developed. State was included as a county-level covariate.

Creator: Karen Kirtland, Data Analyst, Division of Diabetes Translation

Contact phone: (770) 488-8518

Contact email: gon6@cdc.gov

Related links: http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/DDT_STRS2/NationalDiabetesPrevalenceEstimates.aspx


Map of PCI Capability in Idaho, 2010 Map of PCI Capability in Idaho, 2010

Click to download PDF [PDF-285K]

Abstract: This maps depicts the availability of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) capability at Idaho hospitals (as of Sept. 2010). The map also depicts transportation elements such as highways and hospitals with helicopter bases. This map has been used by EMS providers to know the end goal for transportation of ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) patients. Also, EMS directors will use the map in the development of their local STEMI plans.

Location: ID

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3

Data used: Data on cities with hospitals was gathered from Idaho Hospital Association, data on availability of PCI services and helicopter facilities was collected by HDSP and the Cardiac EMS subcommittee.

Methods used: This is the 5th iteration of this map. Changes have been made due to new information on PCI capability as well as input from the Cardiac EMS subcommittee. Based on their recommendations, the map has evolved into an outline of the state and counties (with no color fill) and a minimal legend.

Creator: Robert Graff, chronic disease epidemiologist, Idaho Dept. of Health and Welfare

Contact phone: (208) 334-6521

Contact email: graffr@dhw.idaho.gov


Service Areas for Mammography Clinics via Public Transportation Service Areas for Mammography Clinics via Public Transportation

Click to download PDF [PDF-440K]

Abstract: This project constructed and used a geographic information system and network analysis to quantify spatial and temporal accessibility to mammography facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area. This map shows the areas around each mammography facility that can be reached via public transportation in < 45 minutes, < 60 minutes and < 90 minutes travel time. To highlight public transportation barriers to mammography facilities for those census tracts where the population was most likely to to use public transportation.

Location: GA

Software used: Network Analyst, ESRI, ArcGIS9.3, ESRI, Microsoft EXCEL

Data used: U.S. Census data from 2000, TeleAtlas/GTD_ID boundary files, transportation files from MARTA, FDA MPRIS data on locations of certified mammography facilities, Georgia Cancer Screening Program facility locations

Methods used: Construction of multi-modal transportation network (rail lines bus routes, walk times, bus stops, rail stops, transfers) for Atlanta, GA. Calculation of mean travel time and distance to the closest mammography facility from population weighted centroids of census tracts.

Creator: Lucy Peipins, Epidemiologist, CDC/NCCDPHP/DCPC/EARB

Contact phone: (770) 488-3034

Contact email: lbp6@cdc.gov


Stroke Death Rates, 2000-2006, Adults Ages 35+, by County Stroke Death Rates, 2000-2006, Adults Ages 35+, by County

Click to download PDF [PDF-683K]

Abstract: The map shows that concentrations of counties with the highest stroke death rates - meaning the top quintile - are located primarily in the Southeast, with heavy concentrations of high-rate counties in Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Arkansas. Pockets of high-rate counties also are found in Tennessee, Oklahoma, parts of Texas, and along the coastal plains of North Carolina and South Carolina. This map was created as part of a series of maps displayed on the Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention web site showing heart disease and stroke hospitalizations and deaths. These maps document the large geographic and population-based disparities that exist in cardiovascular disease across the United States. They are intended to be used to inform policy makers and researchers about the disproportionate geographic burden of cardiovascular disease in the U.S.

Location: USA

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3 ESRI

Data used: National Center for Health Statistics Vital Statistics Compressed Mortality Files 2000-2006, U.S. Census Bureau County Population Estimates 2000-2006 from Vintage 2006 data

Methods used: ICD-10 codes for stroke: I60-I69. Age-adjusted death rates for adults 35 years and older were calculated using the 2000 U.S. standard population and are displayed by county per 100,000 total population. Rates were spatially smoothed to enhance the stability of rates in counties with small populations by using a spatial moving average. Deaths (numerators) and population counts (person–year denominators) for each county were combined with the deaths and population counts of the immediate neighboring counties (i.e., contiguous counties) and then divided to produce an average rate. A county was determined to have insufficient data for the display of the death rate if the total number of deaths in that county plus its neighbors was fewer than 20 during the specified time period or if the population count was less than 5 during the specified time period. For the contiguous U.S., we used an Albers conic equal area projection; for Alaska, we used a Miller's Cylindrical projection; and for Hawaii, we used geographic coordinates. Alaska and Hawaii are not in proper geographic scale relative to the continental U.S.

Creator: Linda Schieb, Epidemiogy, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Contact phone: (770) 488-5348

Contact email: lschieb@cdc.gov

Related links: /dhdsp/maps/


Asthma Emergency Department Visit Rates - Rates/10,000, 2005-2008 Asthma Emergency Department Visit Rates - Rates/10,000, 2005-2008

Click to download PDF [PDF-90K]

Abstract: Asthma ED rates/10,000 are shown for pediatric and adult asthma cases. The shading is determined by quartiles of the rates with outliers indicated by yellow outlines. Each county has its individual rate displayed. County level maps of asthma rates are shared with state legislators who may follow up with resource requests in areas of higher rates. County and local health departments can use these county level maps to target specific programs for higher rate areas.

Location: MN

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3.1

Data used: County level ED visit data combined over years 2005-2008. Data obtained from the Minnesota Hospital Association by the Asthma Program of the Minnesota Department of Health

Methods used: Data are displayed for pediatric cases (0-17) and Adults (18+). Shading represents quartiles of rates/10,000 population. Counties indicated as outliers were determined to be higher that 1.5 times the interquartile range (75th-25th percentile). Rates were calculated per 10,000 population

Creator: Paula Lindgren, Biostatistician, Minnesota Department of Health

Contact phone: (651) 201-5636

Contact email: paula.lindgren@state.mn.us


Diabetes Hospitalization Rates by Race/Ethnicity in Massachusetts Counties 2002-2008 Diabetes Hospitalization Rates by Race/Ethnicity in Massachusetts Counties 2002-2008

Click to download PDF [PDF-393K]

Abstract:

Location: MA

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3.1

Data used: Inpatient Hospital Discharge Data, MDPH Division of Healthcare Finance and Policy

Methods used: Rates per 100,000 age-adjusted to the 2000 US Census population. Counts less than 7 suppressed. 2002-2008 years aggregated.

Creator: Katrina D'Amore, Evaluator/Epidemiologist, Massachusetts Department of Public Health

Contact phone: (617) 624-5415

Contact email: katrina.damore@state.ma.us


Heart Disease Mortality by Gender Heart Disease Mortality by Gender

Click to download PDF [PDF-266K]

Abstract: This map displays Heart Disease mortality rates by county and gender. The histograms provided illustrate the differing distributions of heart disease mortality between men and women.

Location: MA

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3.1

Data used: Inpatient Hospital Discharge Data, MDPH Division of Healthcare Finance and Policy

Methods used: Rates per 100,000 age-adjusted to the 2000 US Census population. 2000-2006 years aggregated.

Creator: Katrina D'Amore, Evaluator, Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention and Control Program

Contact phone: (617) 624-5415

Contact email: katrina.damore@state.ma.us


Age-Adjusted Heart Disease Mortality Rates among Adults Ages 35 and Older in Arkansas by County, 2000-2006 Age-Adjusted Heart Disease Mortality Rates among Adults Ages 35 and Older in Arkansas by County, 2000-2006

Click to download PDF [PDF-96K]

Abstract: This map displays county-level age-adjusted heart disease mortality rates among Arkansas adults ages 35 and older for years 2000-2006. Counties colored in darker green are those with higher heart disease mortality rates while those counties in lighter green shading have lower mortality rates.

Counties with the highest mortality rates for heart disease were mainly located along the eastern border of the state, although there are a few counties in the mid-southern portion and mid-western portion of the state that also showed disproportionate levels of heart disease mortality.

Results from this map can be used to target educational messages for the public and to establish partnerships with health care organizations in the area. Maps such as this will be created in a series to examine the patterns of heart disease and stroke mortality and its risk factors in Arkansas for the burden report. In addition, this information will be shared with partners and legislatures to educate about heart disease and stroke in the state and to guide initiatives and resources to appropriate areas and populations.

Location: AR

Software used: ArcGIS9.3 ESRI

Data used: CDC WONDER, National Center for Health Statistics, Vital Statistics Compressed Mortality Files, 2000-2006

Methods used: Age-adjustment of mortality rates using the 2000 U.S. standard population. ICD-10 codes for heart disease were I00-I09, I11, I13, I20-I51.

Creator: Lucy Im, epidemiologist, Arkansas Department of Health

Contact phone: (501) 280-4365

Contact email: lucy.im@arkansas.gov


Massachusetts Stroke Death Rates 2000-2006 Massachusetts Stroke Death Rates 2000-2006

Click to download PDF [PDF-43K]

Abstract: This map displays the Stroke Mortality Rates of those aged 35 and older for each of 13 Massachusetts counties. It also displays Massachusetts cities, highlighting the state capital of Boston. Franklin and Nantucket counties have the highest stroke mortality rates while Norfolk county has the lowest.

Location: MA

Software used: ArcMap

Data used: NCHS Compressed Mortality File

Methods used: Age Adjusted county mortality rates of those aged 35 and older. Rates per 100,000; 2000 US Standard Population used

Creator: Katrina D'Amore, Epidemiologist/Evaluator, MDPH

Contact phone: (617) 624-5415

Contact email: katrina.damore@state.ma.us


Age-adjusted stroke mortality rates per 100,000 people 35 years and older, by county, Montana, 2000-2006 Age-adjusted stroke mortality rates per 100,000 people 35 years and older, by county, Montana, 2000-2006

Click to download PDF [PDF-886K]

Abstract: This map illustrates Montana's age-adjusted stroke mortality rates over a 7-year time-period (2000-2006). It is apparent, from the map, that many counties (especially in central and southeast Montana) had less than 20 stroke deaths and county level data had to be suppressed. It appears that there are certain areas, which cover several adjacent counties, that have high stroke mortality rates. The purpose of this draft map was to illustrate stroke mortality in Montana by county.

Location: MT

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3

Data used: National Center for Health Statistics mortality data provided at the May 2010 training

Methods used: Statistical methods, age-adjusted to the US 2000 population

Creator: Carrie Oser, Epidemiologist/Evaluator, Montana DPHHS

Contact phone: (406) 444-4002

Contact email: coser@mt.gov


Age-adjusted five year mortality rates for heart disease by county, 2002-2006 Age-adjusted five year mortality rates for heart disease by county, 2002-2006

Click to download PDF [PDF-227K]

Abstract: This map is part of a series included in the Impact of Heart Disease and Stroke in Michigan: 2008 Report on Surveillance. The report is a result of a collaborative effort between the Michigan Cardiovascular Alliance, Chronic Disease Epidemiology Section and the Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Unit at MDCH. The maps in the report portray the geographic disparities in cardiovascular disease (CVD), a range of heart diseases and stroke death rates, hospitalization rates, hospital locations, emergency medical system structure, health care resources and relevant programs within the state. This report includes a large number of maps and can be downloaded from www.michigan.gov/cvh. The maps in the report portray the geographic disparities in cardiovascular disease (CVD), a range of heart diseases and stroke death rates, hospitalization rates, hospital locations, emergency medical system structure, health care resources and relevant programs within the state. This report includes a large number of maps and can be downloaded from www.michigan.gov/cvh.

Location: MI

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3 ESRI

Data used: Michigan Department of Community Health Vital statistics, CDC Wonder, ICD 10 codes I00-I09, I11. I13, I20-I51

Methods used: Display, Choropleth mapping, Statistics

Creator: Beth Anderson, Epidemiology, Michigan Department of Community Health

Contact phone: (517) 335-8754

Contact email: andersonb@michigan.gov

Related links: www.michigan.gov/cvh


Major Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Rates by Colorado Counties: Identifying Areas of Need, 2002-2006 Major Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Rates by Colorado Counties: Identifying Areas of Need, 2002-2006

Click to download PDF [PDF-265K]

Abstract: This map is one in a series of maps that documented the mortality burden of cardiovascular diseases in Colorado including age-adjusted mortality rates per 100,000 and number of deaths by county. Ten counties were above the US rate of 289.5 and 27 of counties were above the state rate of 247.5. These data suggest areas where prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease are most needed.

Location: CO

Software used: ArcGIS 9.3 ESRI

Data used: Vital statistics Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, 2000-2005. CDC Wonder 2000-2006 Underlying Cause of Death ICD-10 Codes 100-178

Methods used: Display, Choropleth mapping, Statistics

Creator: Mario Rivera, Epidemiology, Planning, and Evaluation Branch, Colorado Dept of Public Health

Contact phone: (303) 692-3010

Contact email: mmrivera@smtpgate.dphe.state.co.us


 
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