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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

CDC’s Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Program


What is the purpose of the Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Program?

The Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Program (CCDP) was established to build and strengthen state health department capacity and expertise to effectively and efficiently prevent chronic disease and promote health. This important nation-wide support was created to—

  • Ensure that every state has a strong foundation for chronic disease prevention and health promotion.
  • Maximize the reach of chronic disease programs in states for heart disease and stroke, diabetes, obesity, cancer, arthritis, tobacco, nutrition, and physical activity by leveraging shared basic services.
    • These include functions such as data management, communication, and partnership development; capacity to achieve policy and environmental change, health systems changes, and enhanced clinic-community linkages; and a statewide chronic disease plan and coalition of partners.
  • Provide leadership and expertise to work collaboratively across chronic disease conditions and risk factors to most effectively meet population health needs, especially for populations at greatest risk or with the greatest burden.
  • Improve CDC’s assistance to state health departments in chronic disease prevention and health promotion.

How many states were funded?

A total of 58 grantees were funded.

  • 50 States
  • 6 Pacific Islands
  • Puerto Rico
  • District of Columbia

Which CDC funded programs are part of this coordinated cooperative agreement?

The program's purpose is to establish or strengthen Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Programs within Health Departments. The program provides leadership and coordination and supports the development, implementation, and evaluation of CDC funded Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion programs. The focus of the program is on the top five leading chronic disease causes of death and disability (e.g., heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, and arthritis) and their associated risk factors to increase efficiency and impact of categorical diseases and risk factor prevention programs, including, but not limited to heart disease, cancer prevention and control, stroke, arthritis, diabetes, nutrition, physical activity, and obesity. The Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion cooperative agreement supports states to build key cross-cutting chronic disease prevention and health promotion functions that all categorical chronic disease programs can rely on.

What is the federal funding source for the FY 2011 state awards for Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion?

The funding available to support state awards for Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion comes from the FY 2011 Prevention and Public Health Fund.

What is the difference between Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, and proposals for consolidation included in the FY 2012 President’s Budget?

They are quite different. The FY 2012 President’s Budget proposes to consolidate CDC budget line items for several different chronic disease programs including heart disease and stroke, diabetes, cancer, arthritis and other conditions, nutrition, health promotion, prevention centers, and non-HIV/AIDS school health activities. The Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Program ensures that all states will maintain a strong foundation in chronic disease prevention and public health promotion. The awards also allow states the opportunity to pursue new ways of delivering effective and efficient chronic disease prevention and control within their states and pursue a more coordinated approach working with CDC.

Do Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Program awards to states replace funding for categorically funded chronic disease programs including heart disease and stroke, diabetes, cancer, arthritis, and nutrition, physical activity, and obesity?

Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Program awards to states do not replace CDC funding for categorical chronic disease programs. Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Program state awards will strengthen existing chronic disease capacity in cross-cutting areas that all categorical programs in the state depend on, and ensure that all states maintain a strong foundation in chronic disease prevention and health promotion in coming years. It is expected that the chronic disease program will be able to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of categorical programs by strengthening these cross-cutting areas and provide leadership and coordination across the existing categorical programs.

One of the key components of the Funding Opportunity Announcement is expanded surveillance, particularly to identify health disparities. Are states permitted to use funds available through this FOA to expand BRFSS data collection activities and increase sample size to assure adequate data are available to define the burden of chronic diseases and describe associated health disparities?

Resources provided from this FOA may be used to increase state surveillance and epidemiology capacity and to increase BRFSS sample size to obtain data to identify chronic disease disparities.

Does this initiative address any of the newly-formed Healthy People 2020 goals?

This program addresses the Healthy People 2020 focus area(s) obesity, heart disease and stroke, cancer, arthritis, diabetes, nutrition and weight status and physical activity.

What areas should awardee activities be aimed at affecting?

There are eight broad categories in the Funding Opportunity Announcement that awardees are required to address. These areas are: program management and leadership, surveillance and epidemiology, evaluation, state chronic disease prevention and health promotion plan, organizational structure, collaborative processes, communication, and policy.

Over the next 3 years, each state will make substantial progress in developing capacity and implementing a plan of action in four key areas—

  • Achieving policy and environmental changes to improve healthy behaviors.
  • Achieving important improvements to the way that health care systems in the state detect manage and control chronic diseases, conditions and risk factors through better use of chronic disease early detection and clinical preventive services.
  • Enhancing clinic-community linkages so that people at high risk can better take charge of their health through self-management and other community supports.
  • Providing data and information for decision making at the state level through a strong foundation in surveillance and epidemiology. For example, providing expertise in effectively using data and information to identify disease and risk factor burden, prioritize unmet needs, plan public health responses, document outcomes, and communicate important steps that individuals and organizations can take to prevent and control chronic disease.

 
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