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CDC’s Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Program


The Coordinated Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Program (CCDP) was established to build and strengthen state health department capacity and expertise to effectively prevent chronic disease and promote health.

This important nationwide support was created to—

  • Ensure that every state has a strong foundation for chronic disease prevention and health promotion.
  • Maximize the reach of chronic disease programs in states for heart disease and stroke, diabetes, obesity, cancer, arthritis, tobacco, nutrition, and physical activity through shared basic services.
    • These include functions such as data management, communication, and partnership development; capacity to achieve policy and environmental change, health systems changes, and enhanced clinic-community linkages; and a statewide chronic disease plan and coalition of partners.
  • Provide leadership and expertise to work collaboratively across chronic disease conditions and risk factors to most effectively meet population health needs, especially for populations at greatest risk or with the greatest burden.
  • Improve CDC’s assistance to state health departments in chronic disease prevention and health promotion.

Chronic Disease in the United States—Challenges and Opportunities

Nationally, we have made significant progress in chronic disease prevention and control in recent years.

  • Death rates from heart disease and stroke have declined noticeably, and lung, breast, and colorectal cancer incidence and mortality have all declined significantly.1,2
  • Chronic diseases account for more than 75% of the $2.5 trillion spent on health care in the United States. High health care costs burden individuals, businesses, employers, governments, and the nation as a whole.3

However, the national burden of chronic disease remains large in scale, in both health and economic terms.

  • In 2005, 133 million Americans—almost 1 out of every 2 adults—had at least one chronic illness.
  • Chronic diseases and conditions cause major limitations in daily living for almost 1 of 10 Americans or about 25 million people.
  • Chronic diseases account for more than 75% of the more than $2.5 trillion spent on health care in the United States each year. High health care costs burden individuals, businesses, employers, governments, and the nation as a whole.
  • This burden will grow as our population ages. Every day, 10,000 baby-boomers turn 65.

References

  1. Roger VL, Go AS, Lloyd-Jones DM, et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics—2012 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2012;125:e2-e220.
  2. Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al. SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2008. Bethesda, MD. National Cancer Institute; 2008. Available at http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2008.
  3. National Health Expenditures Aggregate, per capita amounts, percent distribution and average annual percent change: Selected calendar years 1960–2010 Website. Available at https://www.cms.gov/NationalHealthExpendData/downloads/tables.pdf [PDF - 565KB]
 
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