This application is not supported by your web browser.
Please open this application in FireFox, Chrome, Safari or IE 9.

If you are on an unsupported browser, errors may occur during the duration of the training.
Click anywhere to close.

You are currently using the lite version
of this application, designed for mobile devices.
For the best experience use a desktop computer.

Touch anywhere to close.

CDC Logo

LESSON 1 QUIZ QUESTION 1

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury (or TBI) caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or by a hit to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth.

  • A

    True

  • B

    False

Submit

LESSON 1 QUIZ QUESTION 2

Which of the following is true?

  • A

    Most concussions occur without loss of consciousness.

  • B

    Athletes who have ever had a concussion are at increased risk for another concussion.

  • C

    Young children and teens are more likely to get a concussion than adults and they take longer to recover than adults.

  • D

    All of the above.

Submit

LESSON 1 QUIZ QUESTION 3

Why is it important to recognize and respond properly to a suspected concussion?

  • A

    Not giving the brain enough recovery time after a concussion can be dangerous. A repeat concussion that occurs before the brain recovers from the first concussion can slow recovery or increase the chances for long-term problems.

  • B

    You can’t see a concussion like you can a broken bone, but it is a disruption of how the brain works and a serious issue.

  • C

    While rare, permanent brain damage and death are two potential consequences of not identifying and responding to a concussion in a proper or timely manner.

  • D

    All of the above.

Submit
SIGNS OBSERVED
by COACHING STAFF
SYMPTOMS REPORTED
by ATHLETES

Explore both sections to continue.

Close

SIGNS OBSERVED
BY COACHING STAFF

  • Appears dazed or stunned
  • Is confused about assignment or position
  • Forgets sports plays
  • Is unsure of game, score, or opponent
  • Moves clumsily
  • Answers questions slowly
  • Loses consciousness (even briefly)
  • Shows behavior or personality changes
  • Can't recall events prior to hit or fall
  • Can't recall events after hit or fall
Close

SYMPTOMS REPORTED
by ATHLETES

  • Headache or "pressure" in head
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Balance problems or dizziness
  • Double or blurry vision
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Sensitivity to noise
  • Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy
  • Concentration or memory problems
  • Confusion
  • Does not "feel right"

LESSON 2 QUIZ QUESTION 1

To help recognize a concussion, you should watch for and ask others to report which of the following two things among your athletes:

  • A

    A forceful bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body that results in rapid movement of the head.

  • B

    Dehydration.

  • C

    Any concussion signs or symptoms, such as a change in the athlete’s behavior, thinking, or physical functioning.

  • D

    Hunger.

LESSON 2 QUIZ QUESTION 2

Out of the following list, please choose five signs or symptoms of a concussion:

  • 1

    Appears dazed or stunned

  • z

    Is confused about assignment or position

  • 2

    Forgets an instruction

  • 3

    Is unsure of game, score, or opponent

  • 4

    Moves clumsily

  • 5

    Answers questions slowly

  • 6

    Loses consciousness (even briefly)

  • 7

    Shows mood, behavior, or personality changes

  • 8

    Can’t recall events prior to hit or fall

  • 9

    Can’t recall events after hit or fall

  • 10

    Headache or “pressure” in head

  • 11

    Nausea or vomiting

  • 12

    Balance problems or dizziness

  • 13

    Double or blurry vision

  • 14

    Sensitivity to light

  • 15

    Sensitivity to noise

  • 16

    Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy

  • 17

    Concentration or memory problems

  • 18

    Confusion

  • 19

    Just not “feeling right” or is “feeling down”

Submit

LESSON 2 QUIZ QUESTION 3

Out of the following list, please choose three signs, called danger signs, of a severe concussion requiring immediate medical attention:

  • 1

    One pupil larger than the other

  • 2

    Drowsiness or inability to wake up

  • 3

    A headache that gets worse and does not go away

  • 4

    Weakness, numbness, or decreased coordination

  • 5

    Repeated vomiting or nausea

  • 6

    Slurred speech

  • 7

    Convulsions or seizures

  • 8

    Inability to recognize people or places

  • 9

    Increasing confusion, restlessness, or agitation

  • 10

    Unusual behavior

  • 11

    Loss of consciousness

Submit

LESSON 4 QUIZ QUESTION 1

After sustaining a concussion, you speak with a health care professional regarding your athlete’s condition and it was determined he could return to play. What is the first step in this process?

  • A

    Begin heavy, non-contact physical activity–including sprinting/running, high-intensity stationary biking, regular weightlifting routine and non-contact sports-specific drills.

  • B

    Start light aerobic exercise, but only to increase an athlete’s heart rate–meaning 5-10 minutes on an exercise bike, walking, or light jogging. No weight lifting, jumping, or hard running.

  • C

    Begin activities that increase the athlete’s heart rate and incorporate limited body or head movement–including moderate jogging, brief running, moderate-intensity stationary biking, and moderate-intensity weightlifting.

  • D

    Put the athlete back into unrestricted play.

  • E

    Reintegrate the athlete in practice sessions, even full contact in controlled practice if appropriate to the sport.

Submit

LESSON 4 QUIZ QUESTION 2

After sustaining a concussion, you speak with a health care professional regarding your athlete’s condition and it was determined he could return to play. What is the second step in this process?

  • A

    Begin heavy, non-contact physical activity–including sprinting/running, high-intensity stationary biking, regular weightlifting routine and non-contact sports-specific drills.

  • B

    Start light aerobic exercise, but only to increase an athlete’s heart rate–meaning 5-10 minutes on an exercise bike, walking, or light jogging. No weight lifting, jumping, or hard running.

  • C

    Begin activities that increase the athlete’s heart rate and incorporate limited body or head movement–including moderate jogging, brief running, moderate-intensity stationary biking, and moderate-intensity weightlifting.

  • D

    Put the athlete back into unrestricted play.

  • E

    Reintegrate the athlete in practice sessions, even full contact in controlled practice if appropriate to the sport.

Submit

LESSON 4 QUIZ QUESTION 3

Concussions affect people differently. While most athletes with a concussion recover quickly and fully, some will have symptoms that last for days, or even weeks. A more serious concussion can last for months or longer.

  • A

    True

  • B

    False

Submit

POST TEST QUESTION 1

A concussion is a:

  • A

    type of traumatic brain injury (or TBI) caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or by a hit to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth.

  • B

    a brain bruise.

  • C

    loud sound heard from far away.

Submit

POST TEST QUESTION 2

When can concussions occur?

  • A

    Only when playing full contact sports.

  • B

    Only when the individual who was hit or jolted loses consciousness.

  • C

    In any organized or unorganized recreational sport or activity and the most occur without loss of consciousness.

Submit

POST TEST QUESTION 3

How do you identify a concussion?

  • A

    By looking at CT or MRI scans of an individual’s brain.

  • B

    By watching for different types of signs or symptoms, such as a change in the athlete’s behavior, thinking, or physical functioning.

  • C

    Asking an athlete if they had their “bell rung” in the last hit.

Submit

POST TEST QUESTION 4

Which of the following are signs of a concussion that you as a coach may identify?

  • A

    The athlete appears stunned, is unsure of the game, score, or opponent, is confused about their assignment or position, and is answering questions slowly.

  • B

    The athlete follows the rules for safety and the rules of the sport, practices good sportsmanship, and uses the proper equipment for the sport.

  • C

    The athlete looks pale, their tongue is white, and after gently pinching the skin, it does not immediately snap back into place.

Submit

POST TEST QUESTION 5

Which of the following are symptoms of a concussion that an athlete may describe?

  • A

    The athlete complains of shoulder pain that radiates down the arm to a tingling feeling in the fingers.

  • B

    The athlete feels weak, tired, and has stopped sweating.

  • C

    The athlete states the lights hurt their eyes, they feel confused, “not right,” and complains of an odd headache with “pressure” in their head.

Submit

POST TEST QUESTION 6

If an athlete has had a previous concussion he or she:

  • A

    is more likely to sustain another concussion, especially if the first concussion has not had time to heal.

  • B

    will never have another concussion.

  • C

    will not sustain another concussion from a similar blow or jolt.

Submit

POST TEST QUESTION 7

What is the first thing you should do as a coach when one of your players has sustained a bump or blow to the head or body and isn’t acting right?

  • A

    Immediately rush an athlete to the hospital–even if none of the Danger Signs are present.

  • B

    Allow the athlete to finish out the quarter/period/half, etc. and then take the athlete for a medical examination.

  • C

    Remove the athlete from play and look for signs or symptoms of a concussion–even those that may appear hours later.

Submit

POST TEST QUESTION 8

Which of the following would be considered Danger Signs of a severe concussion and require rushing an athlete to the emergency department immediately:

  • A

    The athlete seems slightly off balance, complains of a headache, did not lose consciousness, but just “isn’t feeling right”.

  • B

    The athlete lost consciousness, has slightly slurred speech, and seems to become increasingly more confused and restless.

  • C

    The athlete complains of a headache and appears slightly dazed or stunned.

Submit

POST TEST QUESTION 9

When can an athlete return to play after a concussion?

  • A

    As soon as they are feeling better.

  • B

    After being evaluated by a health care professional.

  • C

    After being cleared by a health care professional and after a five-step process in which the athlete’s activity level is slowly increased over a period of days, weeks, or months depending on the athlete’s response to the increasingly challenging activities.

Submit

POST TEST QUESTION 10

When should you talk to the athlete’s parents about the possible concussion he/she may have had?

  • A

    The evening of the event or the following day.

  • B

    Immediately following the game or practice-before allowing the child to go home. You should provide information to the parents regarding the signs and symptoms of concussion, encourage them to see a health care professional, and follow up regarding the status of the athlete.

  • C

    Before the next game/match/event so as to make sure the child is cleared for play.

Submit

POST TEST QUESTION 11

How can you help prevent concussions?

  • A

    By ensuring that all athletes wear properly fitted gear, play with good sportsmanship at all times, and obey the rules of safety.

  • B

    By working with parents, athletes, school and club administrators to spread awareness about concussions all year: pre-season, during the season, and post-season.

  • C

    Both A and B.

Submit

Congratulations

You have successfully completed the Heads Up Training for Coaches.
Please take a moment to save your Certificate of Completion now.

When you close your browser, this information will not be saved.

Certificate Thumbnail

Download Certificate

Having Trouble Printing? – If you are using IE9 or below you
may print this version of the certificate.

Wallet Sized Certificate - you may print an additional wallet-size
copy of the certificate.

DOWNLOADABLE TOOLS — CONCUSSION INFORMATION

View CDC's “Heads Up” Concussion Educational Materials

“Heads Up” for youth sports coaches, administrators, and parents

“Heads Up” for high school coaches, athletic directors, athletic trainers, and parents

“Heads Up” for school nurses, parents, teachers, counselors, and other school professionals

“Heads Up” for health care professionals

Baseline Testing

FAQs on Baseline Testing Fact Sheet

Download a Fact Sheet on Overall Sports Safety: Protect the Ones You Love

For parents

Order Free Copies of CDC's “Heads Up” Educational Materials

Materials on Concussion in Sports

Materials for Health Care Providers

Materials for School Professionals

Learn More about the Brain and How it Works

Order Free Copies of CDC's “Heads Up” Educational MaterialsInteractive Brain [Exit Disclaimer]

Concussion Educational Materials for all NCAA Sports

Download Materials [Exit Disclaimer]

Watch a Video or PSA on Concussion

NFL PSA on Concussion Safety [Exit Disclaimer]

Keeping Quiet Can Keep You Out of the Game [Exit Disclaimer] [Movie: 2:00 minutes]

Read more about Tracy's Story [PDF 187KB]

Keeping Quiet Can Keep You Out of the Game... A Mother's Story [Exit Disclaimer] [Movie: 2:00 minutes]

Brandon's Story News segment from PBS News Hour with Jim Lehrer, which originally aired on January 26th, 2000.

For High School Coaches:

“Concussion in Sports: What You Need to Know,” [Exit Disclaimer]

Free Online Training (Developed in partnership with the National Federation of State High School Associations)

Listen to a Radio PSA

Coach and Team [Audio: 0:30 seconds]

Mom and Daughter [Audio: 0:30 seconds]

Teens [Audio: 0:30 seconds]

Announcers [Audio: 0:30 seconds]

Listen to a Podcast

Heads Up! Play It Safe When It Comes to Concussions! [Podcast: 6:49 minutes]

Heads Up! [Podcast: 0:59 seconds]; in Spanish [Podcast: 1:27 minutes]

Send a Health eCard

Heads Up!

Prevent Concussions

Prevent Head Injuries

Sports Safety

Students Play Safe

Youth Sports Safety

ORDER FREE PRINT COPIES OF CDC'S CONCUSSION RESOURCES

Order Free Copies of CDC's “Heads Up” Educational Materials

Materials on Concussion in Sports

Materials for  Health Care Providers

Materials for School Professionals

Order Large Quantities of CDC's “Heads Up Educational Materials

To order bulk quantities of CDC's concussion resources free-of-charge contact CDC by email (CDC-INFO@cdc.gov) or toll-free at 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636).

Include the title of the publication, quantity requested, mailing address, and subject heading: “Concussion in Sports”)

VIDEOS FROM EXPERTS AND FOR MORE INFORMATION

Watch a Video or PSA on Concussion

NFL PSA on Concussion Safety [Exit Disclaimer]

Keeping Quiet Can Keep You Out of the Game [Exit Disclaimer] [Movie: 2:00 minutes]

Read more about Tracy's Story [PDF 187KB]

Keeping Quiet Can Keep You Out of the Game... A Mother's Story [Exit Disclaimer] [Movie: 2:00 minutes]

Brandon's Story News segment from PBS News Hour with Jim Lehrer, which originally aired on January 26th, 2000.

For High School Coaches:

“Concussion in Sports: What You Need to Know,” [Exit Disclaimer]

Free Online Training (Developed in partnership with the National Federation of State High School Associations)

GET MORE INFORMATION ON CONCUSSION and
TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY IN THE UNITED STATES

Statistics

Causes

Outcomes

Prevention

COMMUNICATING EFFECTIVELY ABOUT CONCUSSIONS

Communicating Effectively about Concussions [PDF 348KB]

DOWNLOAD SPORT-SPECIFIC CONCUSSION INFORMATION

Baseball

Field Hockey

Football

Ice Hockey

Lacrosse

Rugby

Soccer

Softball

Volleyball

Play Mute
Back Next
Participating Orginizations

Amateur Athletic Union
Amateur Softball Association/USA Softball
American Academy of Neurology
American Academy of Pediatrics
American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
American College of Sports Medicine
American Medical Society for Sports Medicine
American School Health Association
American School Health Association
American Sports Education Program
Brain Injury Association of America
Brain Trauma Foundation
Center for Injury Research and Policy, the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital
Children's National Medical Center
Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center
Emergency Nurses Association
Health Resources and Services Administration, EMS for Children
Health Resources Services Administration, Traumatic Brain Injury Program
Massachusetts Department of Public Health
Matthew Alan Gfeller Sport-Related TBI
Research Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
May Clinic
MSU, Institute for the Study of Youth Sports
National Academy of Neuropsychology
National Alliance for Youth Sports
National Association of School Nurses
National Association of Secondary School Principals
National Council for Youth Sports
National Education Association
National Education Association Health Information Network
National Federation of State High School Associations
National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association
National Program for Playground Safety
National Recreation and Park Association
North American Brain Injury Society
Pop Warner Little Scholars, Inc.
President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports
Safe Kids Worldwide
Safe States Alliance
Sarah Jane Brain Foundation
Society of State Directors of Health, Physical Education & Recreation
Sports Legacy Institute
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Sports Medicine Concussion Program
US Lacrosse
US Soccer
USA Baseball
USA Football
USA Rugby
USA Volleyball
YMCA of the USA