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Funding Opportunity Announcement: A Comprehensive Approach to Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country – financed solely by Prevention and Public Health Funding (CDC-DP14-1421PPHF14)

Please continue to check this FAQ page where responses will be posted as questions are received. Please check questions similar to ones you submitted, since not all questions will be posted verbatim and responses may be combined.

Click on the FAQ topic headings below to view an expanded list of questions and responses.

 

CDC appreciates your interest in this funding opportunity announcement. The FAQ section of the A Comprehensive Approach to Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country – financed solely by Prevention and Public Health Funding (CDC-DP14-1421PPHF14) is where questions and answers from the past 12 weeks are posted. Unfortunately, the deadline to submit questions through our website was July 14, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. U.S. Eastern Daylight Time. We regret that we are no longer able to respond to questions.

For questions related to application submission please refer to the FOA. For all other questions please review the FAQ section of A Comprehensive Approach to Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country – financed solely by Prevention and Public Health Funding (CDC-DP14-1421PPHF14).

 

CDC has received several questions asking about how to conduct a specific activity or task or what type of interventions would be appropriate for the FOA. These include questions such as:

  1. Please give an example of a "point of sale” communication strategy.
  2. Will CDC provide more information on an appropriate scope of work for the individual strategies?

We regret that we are unable to respond to these kinds of questions. The purpose of the FAQs is to provide clarification on the funding opportunity announcement, not to provide specific technical assistance.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

General

Purpose

Eligibility

Funding and Budget

Application Process

Review Process

Recipient Activities

Evaluation

Scoring

Other

General

In the Logic Model for Component Two, Inputs include providing Leadership, Technical Assistance, and Training for Component One awardees. Please clarify whether this is correct.

The Logic Model  incorrectly states assistance should be provided to Component One awardees ONLY.  Instead, Component Two applicants should plan to provide Leadership, Technical Assistance, and Training to half plus one or more of the tribes within their IHS designated areas, including sub-awardees identified by Component Two applicants within their work plans.

Is it possible to set up a call with someone to discuss eligibility and proposal ideas?

In order to ensure an open and fair competition we do not host individual phone calls to discuss FOAs, to include eligibility and proposal ideas. The Question and Answer section on the website contains additional information about the FOA. If you still have a question after you have reviewed the questions and answers, please post your question using the “submit a question” link provided on the website.

Can you give examples of documented evidence for “providing public health services and public health system improvement, recent examples of the content and methodology of the capacity building efforts implemented, and capacity building outcomes or benefits that were demonstrated.” (See page 29 of FOA.)

Documented evidence of past successful organizational capacity providing public health service/system improvement could include:

  • Program/system descriptions with outcome measurements.
  • Policy implementation with evidence of impact.
  • Environmental strategies with documented sustainability and expanded reach or effect.

On page 37 of the FOA, is the "CDC Background" referenced in "a. Background" the information contained on pages 10-12? Also, is the "iv. Strategy and Activities" mention of "CDC Project Description: Strategies and Activities" the information on pages 17-23?

Yes.

On page 4 of the FOA, the narrative states that "...strategies must meet a significant proportion of tribal members." Can you please define what is meant by a "significant proportion"?

The intent of “significant proportion” is that, at a minimum, more than half (51%) of all tribal members represented by the Tribal Organization in the proposed work of the FOA will be impacted by the design and intent of the work plan.

Will tribes or Indian organizations be able to partner with tribes for the scientific partner?

The FOA does not reference “scientific partners” per se. However, as identified in the FOA, awardees are expected to collaborate with organizations external to CDC, deemed necessary to achieve project outcomes. Such organizations may include tribes, tribal organizations, Tribal Epidemiology Centers, local, state, federal agencies, educational institutions, non profit organizations and others.

Is there a list of past awardees for this funding opportunity?

This is a new Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), there are no previous grantees or awardees.

I realize that the CDC just released a plethora of grants, and you said that they are reviewed independently, but does that mean that one organization who is eligible could receive multiple awards?

An organization that applies for, let’s say, 3 Funding Opportunity Announcements could conceivably receive three awards.

I have a question regarding sub-awards under Component 2.  If a Tribal Organization were to be awarded funding, and wanted to provide sub-awards to a tribe or tribes who had not been awarded a grant under Component 1, is that acceptable?

Yes, that is acceptable and is encouraged. The expectation under Component 2 is that Tribal Organizations will be working with the tribes in their IHS Administrative Area to facilitate the kinds of activities that would be supported under Component 1. So we would like to see small financial support to tribes to instigate that kind of activity.

What is the definition of a community?

For the purposes of this FOA, “community” is used in several different ways. For example, in “community health representative” and “community-clinical linkages,” “community” refers to a place outside the clinic setting where health supporting activity occurs. In “community action plan” or “community assessment,” “community” refers to a collection of people bound by geography and culture that can encompass an entire jurisdictional boundary (such as a reservation or a county) or a sub-division within that jurisdiction (e.g., the people residing in a district or town and the geographic boundaries of the district or town). A “community” must be comprised of tribal/village members sharing a geographically defined area with jurisdictional boundaries, either in its entirety or a subdivision thereof, and having common characteristics or interests.

Can a region with multiple villages be considered a community as represented by a duly elected tribal health organization?

Yes. Prospective applicants may apply for either Component 1 as a federally recognized American Indian Tribe (or tribes) or Alaskan Native Village (or multiple villages), or for Component 2 as a Tribal Organization, with Tribe and Tribal Organization defined on page 66 of the glossary within the FOA. Federally recognized Alaskan Native villages may apply under Component 1, or may apply in aggregate as a part of a Tribal Organization, so long as that organization meets the “half plus one” criteria found on page 34 of the FOA.

What are the qualifications to be considered a Tribe?

Any Indian tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community, including any Alaskan Native village or regional or village corporation as defined in or established pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (85 Stat. 688), which is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians. Eligible applicants are listed on the Bureau of Indian Affairs website (www.bia.gov/DocumentLibrary/index.htm).

What are the qualifications to be considered a “Tribal Organization”?

“Tribal organization” means: the tribally recognized intertribal organization which the recognized governing bodies of two or more Indian tribes on a reservation authorizes to provide public health leadership and/or programming on their behalf. For the purposes of this FOA, tribal organizations will be those which the recognized governing bodies of half plus 1 of the federally recognized tribes located in an IHS administrative area authorizes to provide public health leadership and/or programming on their behalf.

How many awards will be made?

We anticipate making 12 awards total directly to American Indian Tribes/Alaskan Native Villages.  Our goal is to fund one award in each of the 12 IHS Administrative Areas. Depending on the applications we receive and the strength of those applications, we may fund two awards in one Area and no awards in another Area.

We anticipate making 12 awards total to Tribal Organizations.  Our goal is to fund one award in each of the 12 IHS Administrative Areas. Depending on the applications we receive and the strength of those applications, we may fund two awards in one Area and no awards in another Area.

Is direct assistance (DA) for personnel available through this FOA?

Applicants may request that CDC provide Direct Assistance (DA) in the form of federal personnel as a part of the grant awarded through this FOA.  If your request for DA is approved as a part of your award, CDC will reduce the funding amount provided directly to you as a part of your award.  The amount by which your award is reduced will be used to provide DA; the funding shall be deemed part of the award and as having been paid to you, the awardee.

What is the project period/approximate start date of the awards?

The project period is for 5 years. The approximate start date will be no later than September 30, 2014.

Do we need to implement a competitive process for selecting sub-recipients?

Component 2 applicants will need to propose criteria to select tribes in their respective areas and may provide sub awards to initiate Component 1 activities. Applicants must follow guidance as stated in 45 CFR Part 92 or 74.

Can funds be used to support research?

No.

For the purposes of this FOA, how do you define infrastructure?

An infrastructure change includes establishing systems, procedures, and protocols within communities, institutions, and networks that support healthy behaviors. This includes improving linkages among service agencies, public health, and health care systems. Note that this program is not authorized to conduct construction and/or modernization projects.

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Purpose


 

What is the purpose of the new Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA)?

The primary purpose of this funding is to establish or strengthen and broaden the reach and impact of effective chronic disease prevention programs that improve the health of tribal members and communities. The approach includes a combination of policy and environmental approaches, community clinical linkages, and health system interventions.

What are the anticipated outcomes of this FOA?

As shown in the Logic Model and on pages 13-16 of the FOA, a series of short and intermediate-term outcomes are expected to be achieved as a result of awardee efforts.  The literature indicates that these outcomes are important drivers of the long-term impacts related to chronic disease burden and risk factor prevalence.

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Eligibility


 

If there are 2 tribes in my service area does our tribal organization need to serve both in order to be eligible for these funds?

Yes. Tribal organizations eligible to apply as Component 2 applicants must represent half plus one of the tribes/villages in their IHS designated area.

Page 43 refers to "eligibility criteria." Is there a list of eligibility criteria or is that the Phase II Review elements?

The reference to eligibility requirement on page 43 refers to the eligibility information on page 34 of the FOA.

Are tribal epidemiology centers eligible to apply as component 2?

A variety of different entity types may apply under Component 2, including Tribal Epi Centers, if the criteria for a Component 2 applicant are met as described on page 34 of the FOA.

Component 2 applicants may apply for funding amounts, as described on page 17, depending upon number of tribes in the IHS Administrative Area served by the applicant.

Are tribal organizations that serve only a portion of the IHS service area in our state eligible to apply?

Tribal Organizations eligible to apply as Component 2 applicants must represent half plus one of the tribes/villages in their IHS designated area.

Are non-federally recognized tribes eligible to apply?

No. Only federally recognized tribes are eligible to apply as Component 1 applicants.

What does limited competition mean?

Limited competition means the competition is not open to everyone. This distinction is made in the eligibility criteria.

Are National 501C3 organizations, governed by Native American's eligible to apply? If so does the resolution for applying come from the Board of Directors?

Eligible applicants are:

Component 1: American Indian Tribes and Alaskan Native Villages
Component 2: American Indian or Alaska Native Tribal Organizations

In order to be eligible, the National 501C3 organizations, governed by Native American’s would have to meet one of the below definitions.

Qualifications to be considered a Tribe:
Any Indian tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community, including any Alaskan Native village or regional or village corporation as defined in or established pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (85 Stat. 688), which is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians. Eligible applicants are listed on the Bureau of Indian Affairs website (www.bia.gov/DocumentLibrary/index.htm).

Qualifications to be considered a “Tribal Organization”:
“Tribal organization” means: the tribally recognized intertribal organization which the recognized governing bodies of two or more Indian tribes on a reservation authorizes to provide public health leadership and/or programming on their behalf. For the purposes of this FOA, tribal organizations will be those which the recognized governing bodies of half plus 1 of the federally recognized tribes located in an IHS administrative area authorizes to provide public health leadership and/or programming on their behalf.

If the “National 501C3 organization” is a tribally recognized intertribal organization and is authorized by two or more Indian tribes on a reservation to provide public health leadership and/or programming on their behalf and is an organization which the recognized governing bodies of half plus 1 of the federally recognized tribes located in an IHS administrative area authorizes to provide public health leadership and/or programming on their behalf, then the “National 501C3 organization” is eligible to apply.

Is a letter of intent required?

No, a letter of intent is not required

Is an IHS service unit eligible to apply on behalf of a tribal community?

No, stipends are only allowable when permitted by authorizing statute usually for trainees and fellowship awards.  Therefore it is not allowable for this FOA.

Is an IHS service unit eligible to apply on behalf of a tribal community?

Eligible applicants are:
Component 1: American Indian Tribes and Alaskan Native Villages
Component 2: American Indian or Alaska Native Tribal Organizations

In order to be eligible, the IHS unit would have to meet one of the below definitions.

Qualifications to be considered a Tribe:
Any Indian tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community, including any Alaskan Native village or regional or village corporation as defined in or established pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (85 Stat. 688), which is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians. Eligible applicants are listed on the Bureau of Indian Affairs website (www.bia.gov/DocumentLibrary/index.htm).

Qualifications to be considered a “Tribal Organization”:
“Tribal organization” means: the tribally recognized intertribal organization which the recognized governing bodies of two or more Indian tribes on a reservation authorizes to provide public health leadership and/or programming on their behalf. For the purposes of this FOA, tribal organizations will be those which the recognized governing bodies of half plus 1 of the federally recognized tribes located in an IHS administrative area authorizes to provide public health leadership and/or programming on their behalf

If the IHS service unit is a tribally recognized intertribal organization and is authorized by two or more Indian tribes on a reservation to provide public health leadership and/or programming on their behalf and is an organization which the recognized governing bodies of half plus 1 of the federally recognized tribes located in an IHS administrative area authorizes to provide public health leadership and/or programming on their behalf, then the IHS service unit is eligible to apply.

We are a regional consortium, representing a portion of the entire Area, is this FOA specific to the entire Area? Would we be expected to serve the entire Area?

To meet the conditions of the FOA, your organization must have letters of support/resolutions from half plus one of the tribes/villages in your IHS area. Per the FOA, you may sub award to another tribal organization, as appropriate, to accomplish the work in the entire area.

Should we use the definition of BIA areas or IHS administrative areas to define the area we are responsible for serving?

Applicants should refer to IHS administrative areas. See http://www.ihs.gov/locations/ for the IHS Areas.

We are the only tribe in our IHS administrative area. Are we eligible to apply for Component 2?

No. You are eligible to apply for Component 1

We are eligible as a Tribal Organization under a number of designations, and our program serves all tribes in a designated Indian Health Service Region. However, the Board of Directors of the organization only serves the tribes in 1 of the 3 states. Would we still be eligible to apply?

Yes, the criteria described would meet the eligibility requirements and you would be eligible to apply. You would be expected to serve half plus one or more of the Tribes in your IHS administrative area.

My tribe was awarded a grant from CDC for Community Transformation, and many of the goals and objectives of this new program are very similar to what we are currently doing in our community, and what we have completed [for CTG] (the assessment, etc.).  I am wondering if we are still eligible to apply for this and would we be able to get an award to continue our current work with the Community Transformation Grants?

If you are a tribe, you are eligible to apply for this grant; however you would be applying to do the work that is described in this Funding Opportunity Announcement, not to continue the work that was funded under the Community Transformation Grant Program. However, as you point out, there are a number of similarities between the two programs.

Will national organizations be allowed to apply under Component 2? And if so, will they be in a separate category from regional IHS Area Tribal Organizations?

In order for a national organization to be eligible, they would have to meet the terms of the Tribal Organization definition. They would also have to work in an Area, and represent ½ plus 1 of tribes in that Area.

CDC has released several excellent RFPs over this last week; they’re all coming out at the same time, with deadline dates that are at the same time. We would be eligible for several of these awards. Given the time frame and requirements and so forth, would CDC consider funding 2, or even 3, proposals from the same Tribal Organization?

Each Funding Opportunity Announcement will be reviewed independently, and we will not be looking at who is being awarded for which Funding Opportunity Announcement before deciding whether to award for funding opportunities. These are each independent processes. However, once awards are made, we and awardees will need to ensure that awards are not duplicative and that no awardee is receiving funds from multiple streams to accomplish the same work.

I have a question about the “half plus 1” tribal resolutions or letters of support. Do those need to be specifically addressing this grant application or can they be tribal resolutions or letters of support for the Tribal Epidemiological Center?

They can be either of those things. They can be the resolution that supports your organization, or they can be specific to this particular funding opportunity announcement.

Our Tribal Organization serves 23 tribes in Arizona, but the Tribal Epi Center (TEC) serves over 30 tribes in three different states in UT, NV, and AZ, which is considered our IHS Area. Since the Tribal Epi Center is part of the overall Tribal Organization, which funding amount are we eligible to apply for? Under Component 2 it says “tribes fewer than 25, can receive up to $650,000” and [“tribes 25 and over”] may receive up to $850,000.

It would depend on which organization is applying for this FOA, and the number of tribes they would be serving. You may not apply to serve all 30 tribes and then only serve 23.

Our Tribal Organization would apply for the grant, but the lead program under ITCA would be the TEC, and so we are wondering which amount would we apply for, the $650,000 or the $850,000 based on the number of tribes served between the ITCA and the TEC?

You apply for the amount based on the tribes that you are serving in the Area, and you would be expected to serve those tribes. You could not apply based on the 30+ tribes, then only work with the 23 tribes.

Are Urban Indian Health Organizations eligible to apply?

Eligible applicants are:

Component 1: American Indian Tribes and Alaskan Native Villages
Component 2: American Indian or Alaska Native Tribal Organizations

In order to be eligible, the Urban Indian Health Organization would have to meet one of the below definitions.

Qualifications to be considered a Tribe:
Any Indian tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community, including any Alaskan Native village or regional or village corporation as defined in or established pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (85 Stat. 688), which is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians. Eligible applicants are listed on the Bureau of Indian Affairs website (www.bia.gov/DocumentLibrary/index.htm).

Qualifications to be considered a “Tribal Organization”:
“Tribal organization” means: the tribally recognized intertribal organization which the recognized governing bodies of two or more Indian tribes on a reservation authorizes to provide public health leadership and/or programming on their behalf. For the purposes of this FOA, tribal organizations will be those which the recognized governing bodies of half plus 1 of the federally recognized tribes located in an IHS administrative area authorizes to provide public health leadership and/or programming on their behalf

If the Urban Indian Health Organization is a tribally recognized intertribal organization and is authorized by two or more Indian tribes on a reservation to provide public health leadership and/or programming on their behalf and is an organization which the recognized governing bodies of half plus 1 of the federally recognized tribes located in an IHS administrative area authorizes to provide public health leadership and/or programming on their behalf, then the Urban Indian Health Organization is eligible to apply.

My question is in regards to the endorsements of the member tribes in your organization, for Component 2. Are you requiring an individual resolution from each tribe, or would a resolution from the Board of Director’s, that represents each of the tribes, suffice?

If you are constituted based on resolutions from tribes that would suffice as your eligibility. Tribes have, through the constitution of your organization, established your organization as delivering these services to the tribes. We need to be able to see in your application submission that you meet these requirements of representing “half plus 1” of the tribes.

If all members of the organization are represented by a Board of Directors, a resolution from the Board of Directors should be sufficient.

If that resolution indicates all the tribes involved, yes.

Who is eligible to apply for funding?

Component 1: American Indian Tribes and Alaskan Native Villages
Component 2: American Indian or Alaskan Native Tribal Organizations

Are Urban Tribal programs eligible to apply?

Tribal Organizations that meet the qualifications on page 66-67 of the FOA are eligible to apply.

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Funding and Budget


 

Can funds be budgeted in Year 1 for a FTE Health Educator?

The applicant should determine the best staffing mix to accomplish year one activities, which focus heavily on the cross-sector, community-level assessment. Funds for staffing would be addressed in the Budget Narrative section of the application.

Our tribe's current enrollment is approximately 4,950 members, which means that we can only apply for $200,000 per year. Assuming that we are funded and that our population surpasses 5,000 members in the next year or so, will we be able to apply for $325,000 for subsequent years?

Your organization should apply for funding based on the current membership. Subsequent years of funding are based on availability of funds and satisfactory progress. CDC will provide guidance to awardees each year regarding the funding available in support of their project.

Can funds be budgeted in Year 1 to support travel and training for Tribal health providers to attend train-the-trainer Smoking Cessation Training?

Funding to support Train-the-Trainer for cessation would need to be part of an overall health systems intervention strategy, and would be considered within the context of the overall workplan. Generally, CDC does not recommend funding cessation efforts at the individual level as it is expensive and has less impact than broader policy interventions, such as incorporating tobacco use assessment, brief cessation intervention, and referrals into all healthcare contacts with tobacco users which can be increased through health systems change interventions.

Can grant funds be used to pay costs associated with community-wide physical activities, through either shared facility use/leasing agreements or events promoting physical activities (run/walks, health fairs)?

Yes. If an applicant discovers, through their cross-sector, partnership-led community assessment, a population need that could be addressed effectively and sustainably by these activities, and follow up evaluation of activity impact is built into the planned intervention to evaluate intended impact and outcomes, then these types of activities could be supported by CDC funds. However, these activities apart from a community-level year one assessment identifying their need would be discouraged.

Is the purchase of food an allowable cost?

No. According to HHS Grant Policy Statement rules, CDC funds may not generally be used for the purchase of food.

Should a detailed budget with budget narrative be submitted for the total project period of five years, or just for the first 12 months?

You only need to submit a detailed budget with budget narrative for the first 12 months.

Are there any mandatory meetings/trainings that staff will be required to attend? If so, how many staff should we budget in travel to attend?

Expectations to participate in relevant meetings, committees, conference calls, and working groups related to the cooperative agreement requirements to achieve outcomes are noted on page 32, #13. Specific budget or personnel applications have not been projected at this time. Including a line item for travel to an annual awardee meeting, to include key program members, may be helpful for your budget planning.

Can FOA funding be used to support promotion/marketing of the activities we plan as part of our strategy for addressing the five areas of focus?

Yes, funds can be used for the promotion/marketing of prevention activities outside of "direct patient care" as part of a planned strategy to addressing focus areas.

Our Tribe is still without a reservation, twelve years after its federal acknowledgment, due to ongoing litigation over the land-into-trust process. The Tribe operates a health clinic and related behavioral and human services programs at three locations in counties that are part of our health delivery service area. Can we define our target population as members of the Tribe in those counties, plus other American Indian and Alaska Native people who are patients/clients of our services in those counties? Our population so defined would be less than 5,000 people.

Yes. For the purposes of determining funding levels in this FOA, as described on page 17, American Indian Tribe/Alaska Native Village populations refer to enrolled members of that tribe or village. However, with a holistic and comprehensive approach to health, the tribal population at large is expected to benefit from proposed interventions.

Is leveraging other CDC resources allowable (e.g., Tribal Tobacco Control)?

Yes. But, award funding may not be used to accomplish the same work that is currently funded under another funding opportunity, as this would be duplicate funding for identical purposes. Funding under this FOA may be used to expand on similar previous work that aligns with the new proposed goals and objectives identified through the community assessment.

Can funds be used to construct the building of drying racks, sweat lodges, smoke houses, or a community subsistence center?

No. These funds cannot be used for construction and/or modernization projects.
See other Q & A about construction for additional information.

How long will funding be available for this FOA, and will funding be available on an annual basis?

The funds for this FOA are available annually for a five-year project period pending the availability of funds.

If a Category 2 Tribal Organization is funded and a Tribe submits a letter of support as they are in the Tribal Organization service area, can they apply for this funding as a Tribe in the future?

We are not able to determine application requirements of future FOAs.

Which portion of the community population (American Indian/Alaska Native only, or total community population including non-native) should be considered when applying for funding amounts under the FOA funding strategy on page 17?

The FOA is intended to address health disparities in American Indian/Alaska Native populations, although non-native community members may also benefit from program interventions. For the purposes of this FOA, American Indian/Alaska Native tribal member populations should be used to determine which funding level to apply for.

On page 41 of the FOA under Funding Restrictions it says, "Awardees may not use funds for clinical care." Can you define clinical care? Is this definition inclusive of health education, lactation consultants, or healthy habit follow-up management (e.g. Sweet Success program activities)?

Funds cannot be used to pay for clinical care (i.e., health care services delivered by a health care provider such as counseling, screening, treatment) or other direct services (e.g., other health education).

Can you define direct services?

In general, a direct service relates to the delivery of one-on-one or one-on-small group services. For example, using funds to pay the salary of a community health worker/representative to provide a service to individuals, or free transportation to individuals participating in a program would be an inappropriate use of federal funds and are not within the scope of this FOA. However use of funds related to a programmatic activity resulting in policy, environmental, or systems improvements are allowable. For example, the use of funds to train a multi-disciplinary team, including community health workers/representative, to increase cultural competencies is allowable.

How many tribal organizations in each of the 12 IHS Administrative areas will be funded in component 2?

Up to 2 tribal organizations in each of the 12 IHS Administrative areas will be funded, depending of the strength of the applications.

Can funds be used for stipends?

No, stipends are only allowable when permitted by authorizing statute usually for trainees and fellowship awards. Therefore it is not allowable for this FOA.

Does contracting out for limited program services hurt the applicant, as opposed to providing similar services, directly?

No, contracting out does not hurt the applicant; as subawards or subcontracts are allowable to carry out a portion of the programmatic effort. However, the direct and primary recipient in a cooperative agreement program must perform a substantial role in carrying out project outcomes and not merely serve as a conduit for an award to another party or provider who is ineligible.

What is generally considered an acceptable expense on evaluation?

There are several categories of typical costs for conducting evaluations. For example, personnel costs, travel, supplies and materials, communications, copying and printing, consultants and subcontracts. For this FOA, we are asking that you budget at least ten percent of the total funding award for evaluation.

How much funding is available for the FOA?

  • Approximate Total Fiscal Year Funding: $14 million
  • Approximate Total Project Period Funding: $70 million
  • Approximate Number of Awards: Up to 24
  • Ceiling of Individual Award Range: Component 1: $450,000; Component 2: $1,100,000 (this amount is subject to the availability of funds).

When will funds be made available to award recipients?

Funds will be made available no later than 9/30/2014.

What will be the average one year award amount?

Approximate Average Award: Component 1: $325,000; Component 2: $850,000

Floor of Individual Award Range: Component 1: $100,000; Component 2: $650,000 (this amount is subject to the availability of funds).

Should funds be budgeted for evaluation activities?

Applicants are encouraged to budget 10% of the total funding award to evaluation activities. Evaluation is one of the 10 essential public health functions and awardees should build capacity in this area through use of internal evaluators and/or by working with Tribal Epidemiology Centers as appropriate. However, if awardees choose, they may contract with outside/independent evaluators.

Can I apply for more than the ceiling listed in the FOA?

Applicants should not request more than the ceiling listed in the FOA.

Are PPHF funds used to support this FOA?

Yes

Should travel costs for required meetings be included in the budget?

Yes

Are matching funds required?

No

Will funding be based on target population size or location?

Yes:

For Component 1, the target population includes enrolled members of federally recognized tribes and applicants may apply as follows:

  • Tribes/Alaskan native villages with populations 5,000: up to $200,000
  • Tribes/Alaskan native villages with populations of 5,000 to <20,000: up to $325,000
  • Tribes/Alaskan native villages with populations of 20,000 or more: up to $450,000

For Component 2, the target population is comprised of federally recognized tribes/Alaskan Native villages in the IHS Administrative Area to be served and applicants may apply as follows:

  • Areas with 50+ federally recognized tribes/Alaskan native villages: up to $1,100,000.
  • Areas with 25-49 federally recognized tribes/Alaskan native villages: up to $850,000.
  • Areas with fewer than 25 federally recognized tribes/Alaskan native villages: $650,000.

Component 2 applicants may provide financial support to the federally and state recognized tribes/villages to be served in the area, and to other tribal organizations, as appropriate.

The funding amounts reflect the ceiling of individual award range for a fiscal(one) year, which is subject to the availability of funds.

Can funds be used for construction?

No.

This program is not authorized to conduct construction and/or modernization projects. Construction projects are applicable only to "construction" funding opportunity announcements under the Public Health Service Act (PHSA), Section 307(b)(10) [Section 307(b)(10)]. This authority does not apply to "program" specific FOA's. Therefore, recipients may not use PPHF funding for construction (including, but not limited to, labor or materials). PPHF funds may be used, for example, to assess support for a community initiative and educate community members, educate intervention population members, identify requirements for facilities, and conduct planning in preparation for construction. Any funds used for construction purposes would need to be provided by another source.

Can funds in this FOA be used to purchase: 1) video-conferencing equipment, recording and streaming equipment and other interactive learning tools that can be used for community education and outreach on chronic disease, and; 2) telemedicine equipment that can be utilized in the community and in schools to provide patient counseling and guidance on chronic disease prevention and management?

According to 2CFR225, Appendix A and Appendix B, Selected Items of Cost, items 11 and 15, the acquisition costs of “special purpose equipment” (see definition below) are allowable as direct charges if it is determined to be necessary for the CDC project. However, in this instance, video conferencing and telemedicine equipment do not align with or support the place-based approach described in the FOA, and therefore would not be approved for purchase with CDC funds. Grantees may work with partners to pursue other sources of funding for this equipment if desired.

“Special purpose equipment” means equipment which is used only for research, medical, scientific, or other technical activities. Examples of special purpose equipment include microscopes, x-ray machines, surgical instruments, and spectrometers.

Is there a requirement as to how much funding I sub award?

No, there is not a requirement. However, a grantee must maintain sufficient funding to provide oversight and monitoring of the award.

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Application Process


 

Regarding the Work Plan, on pg. 29 of the FOA, Section d. Work Plan, it states that "A high-level work plan for years two through five should address how progress will continue." Please define "high-level"?

For this FOA, we are contrasting “high-level” with an assessment-driven, detailed level view. Information that would be necessary for a detailed-level view of years two through five would not be available until after the year one cross-sector, community assessment is completed. The best that could be expected during a pre-assessment plan for years two through five would be a general plan of work based on what is known at the community level currently.

Does the grant application require both a MOA and a MOU as listed on page 54, under item J?

No. Applicants should include only those attachments that are relevant to the proposed work.

Does the work plan include both the template and a narrative description or is the work plan template all that is needed for this item?

A sample Work Plan template is provided on page 30 of the FOA, and can be used at the discretion of the applicant. Whether the sample template is used or not, the minimum information to be included in the work plan is detailed on pages 29 and 30 of the FOA, and must include sufficient information so that proposed applicant populations to be served, infrastructure, strategies, activities, and outcomes can be evaluated by reviewers. All elements listed as "minimum" requirements on pages 29 and 30 must be addressed in the Work Plan section of the application.

As a Component 1 applicant, is it appropriate to consider as possible future partners the following types of organizations: 1) community-area and private foundations, 2) national Native re-granting institutions such as First Nations Development Institute, 3) Native-specific service agencies, 4) the local Indian Education program and 5) state-wide Native organizations such as an Indian Education Association and Indian Elders Association?

Composition of cross-sector partnerships are to be determined by applicants, and should include a broad and diverse membership that the applicant deems will maximize opportunities to address community identified gaps, leverage resources, and promote sustainability of efforts.

In describing both current and possible future collaborative partners for the Component 1 category, is it necessary that the respective Letters of Support describe the "comprehensive contribution to the overall program strategy" as described on page 62 in the Glossary section?

No. Letters of support should describe specific contributions, as well as potential contributions that prospective partners could contribute to the overall program strategy.

Which portion of the community population (American Indian/Alaska Native only, or total community population including non-native) should be considered when applying for funding amounts under the FOA funding strategy on page 17?

The FOA is intended to address health disparities in American Indian/Alaska Native populations, although non-native community members may also benefit from program interventions. For the purposes of this FOA, American Indian/Alaska Native tribal member populations should be used to determine which funding level to apply for.

There is redundancy throughout the application (e.g., the target population for intervention is requested in at least three different sections; the proposed objectives are also requested in three different sections). Is it acceptable to present a table and/or narrative referring the reader back to a specific section and page number where the information is first presented, rather than having to repeat the same information several times?

Yes, you may reference back using a section number and page number.

Should the narrative and work plan be paginated sequentially as one document, i.e. 1-25; or each as a free standing document since they are to be submitted as separate documents?

Since the Work Plan is included in the Project Narrative’s 25-page limit (FOA p. 39), pagination should be sequential and noted in the Table of Contents.

Can references for the project narrative be a separate attachment or are they included in the 25 page limit?

Yes, references can be uploaded as a separate attachment and they are not a part of the 25 page limit.

Are resumes included in the narrative page limit?

No. Additional attachments that contain resumes, CVs, or organizational charts are not apart of the narrative page limit.

Does the Calibri 12 point font size requirement apply to tables and charts too?

Yes

Where do MOUs go in the proposal?

Brief, functional descriptions of MOU’s, and how they contribute to completion of project goals, may be mentioned in the Organizational Capacity section of the Project Narrative. Actual copies of MOU’s can be submitted as an attachment, as mentioned on page 56 of the FOA.

Could you please clarify the required order for the Project narrative?

  1. Background
  2. Approach
    1. Problem statement
    2. Purpose
    3. Outcomes
    4. Strategy and Activities
      1. Collaborations
      2. Target populations
  3. Applicant Evaluation and Performance Plan

What elements are expected in the Background vs. the Problem Statement?

Background: Applicants must provide a description of relevant background information that includes the context of the problem.

Problem Statement: Applicants must describe the core information relative to the problem for the jurisdictions or populations they serve. The core information must help reviewers understand how the applicant’s response to the FOA will address the public health problem and support public health priorities.

Page 13 refers to domains. Are the three domains the 1) Policy, Systems, and Environmental Approaches, 2) Community-Clinical Linkages, and 3) Health System Interventions?

Yes

Page 17 seems to indicate that "strategic planning" is intended for Year 1 with "Strategy development and implementation" and "develop and strengthen comprehensive network of partners" going in Years 2-5. Is this correct?

At a minimum, strategic planning must be completed in year 1, applicants may proceed with development, implementation and strengthening network partners upon the completion of the planning and should continue to modify based on ongoing evaluation assessments in years 2-5.

We are planning on offering financial support to regional partners to enact strategies under the FOA. Do we need to reference the Component One logic model, etc. in our application?

If you are a Component Two applicant planning on supporting tribal programs in your area/region, then you may refer to the Component One logic model to articulate your plan or clearly list the areas you will be focusing on with the financial support to tribal programs.

The FOA requires that tribal organizations provide letters of support from "half plus one" of all tribes in their IHS designated area. This is difficult to do given the time constraint for application submission. Has this requirement changed?

No. The special eligibility requirement for tribal organizations, which is noted on page 34 of the FOA, has not changed. However, existing resolutions may be provided to meet this requirement and letters of support sent by email are acceptable.

How many short-term outcomes are applicants expected to select?

One to two short-term outcomes from each of the three domains based on their assessment of their communities.

We have a question regarding the Purpose Statement, on pages 12 and 13. We will be applying under Component 2, but in the middle of the paragraph on page 13, it says “as outlined in Component 1”. Do we have to address all of the 6 to 7 areas listed in Component 1, or do we just choose selected areas? Or how do you envision that piece?

The role of the Component 2 Tribal Organization is to really build momentum for the kinds of activities that are supported under Component 1. You would be looking across the tribes in your Area that you serve, and who are eager to join with you in this work. And they will be deciding which kinds of activities under Component 1 they are ready to implement with your training, technical assistance, and leadership. Every tribe in your Area does not need to do every one of the Component 1 activities, but you, if you are the funded organization, would be providing leadership, training, and technical assistance, bringing tribes together to share their strategies so that full range of activities could be undertaken across the tribes in the Area.

I have a couple of technical questions. On page 30, the description of the “work plan” – there are several descriptions, narrative descriptions that are listed there, as well as a Work Plan template that is provided. Is it correct that you want the descriptions in narrative form, and you want the Work Plan separately? Those are both considered the Work Plan? Because it looks like under the project narrative, on page 37, those same areas are not listed. Do I understand that correctly, that you want a narrative included with the Work Plan template that is completed?

Yes, we would like to see narrative description to support the table. Yes, we would like to see both.

When are applications due, and when will awards be announced?

Applications are due on July 22, 2014 and awards will be announced by September 30, 2014.

How can people ask questions about the FOA?

All inquiries should be directed to www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/about/tribalhealthwellness.

Do I need to provide letters of support?

Component 1 awardees must be eligible tribal applicants as noted in the Eligible Applicant section of the FOA. Eligible tribal applicants should provide support in the form of an official letter from official tribal leadership, or a tribal resolution.

All eligible Component 2 applicants must provide official letters of support or resolutions from the tribes they intend to work with under the funding announcement, representing half plus one of the tribes in their IHS designated area.

Should the letters of support be sent directly to CDC? Who should the letters be addressed to?

The letters should not be sent directly to CDC. They should be included with the application. 

The letters of support should be addressed to a designated person at the organization applying for funds.

Is there a page limit for the project narrative?

Yes, the narrative can be no more than 25 pages.

Is the budget included as part of the total page limit for applications?

No, the budget is not part of the 25 narrative page limit.

Is an itemized budget required?

Applicants must submit an itemized budget narrative. When developing the budget narrative, applicants must consider whether the proposed budget is reasonable and consistent with the purpose, outcomes, and program strategy outlined in the project narrative. The budget must include:

  • Salaries and wages
  • Fringe benefits
  • Consultant costs
  • Equipment
  • Supplies
  • Travel
  • Other categories
  • Total Direct Costs
  • Total Indirect Costs
  • Contractual Cost

For guidance on completing a detailed budget, see Budget Preparation Guidelines at: http://www.cdc.gov/od/pgo/funding/grants/foamain.shtm.

Applicants must name this file ”Budget Narrative” and upload it as a PDF file at www.grants.gov.

If requesting indirect costs in the budget, a copy of the indirect cost-rate agreement is required.  If the indirect cost rate is a provisional rate, the agreement must have been made less than 12 months earlier.  Applicants must name this file “Indirect Cost Rate” and upload it at www.grants.gov.

Should the Work Plan be included in the narrative or as an attachment?  

Work plan narrative is part of the 25-page narrative. However an applicant should use the sample work plan template on page 31. Applicants must name this file “work plan” and upload it as a PDF file at www.grants.gov.

Do attachments count towards the 25 page limit for the narrative?

No

Will the conference call meeting notes be available to those unable to make the call?

Yes, the scripts from the conference calls will be made available online at www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/about/tribalhealthwellness. Audio recordings are not available.

Are applicants required to submit detailed budgets for sub-awardees as a part of the application?

No, detailed budgets for sub awards are not required as part of the application.

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Review Process


 

What type of review process will occur for this competition?

All applications will be reviewed initially for completeness by CDC PGO staff and will be reviewed jointly for eligibility by the CDC/NCCDPHP and PGO. Incomplete applications and applications that do not meet the eligibility criteria will not advance to Phase II review. Applicants will be notified that their applications did not meet eligibility or published submission requirements.

Two separate review panels will evaluate complete, eligible applications for Component 1 and Component 2 in accordance with the “Criteria” section of the FOA.  

Where are the application review criteria in the FOA?

The review criteria are found on pages 43-47.

Will Tribes and Tribal Organizations compete against each other for funding?

No, Tribal programs will apply under Component 1 and Tribal Organizations will apply under Component 2.

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Recipient Activities


 

How will we determine our area of focus without conducting our community assessment which is to be completed in year 1?

Applicants should propose interventions they consider most relevant and needed based on what is currently known about their communities, and within the framework of the FOA. The year one assessment could expand proposed work to cover identified gaps, redirect initially proposed work entirely based upon new insights gained, or reinforce the need for ongoing work with expanded focus and impact due to the breadth of a cross-sector partnership perspective. However, work undertaken as a result of the year one assessment must be consistent with the work supported under this FOA.

Should the logic model lay out a specific set of related risk factors and outcomes? Or, because the Community Assessment must focus on all risk factors related to chronic diseases, should the logic model focus solely on collaboration-related outcomes (non-specific to risk factors and disease outcomes?)

No. The logic model should describe the collaborative approach proposed to work towards addressing chronic disease risk factors using an organizational framework of: policy and environmental approaches, community clinical linkages, and health system interventions. Specific identification of risk factors and interventions will be developed based on identification of needs (e.g., the community assessment) and collaborative planning of community-based interventions.

Does the community assessment need to focus on all of the areas (e.g., nutrition and physical activity) if we are only working on tobacco cessation?

Yes. Ultimately, grantees must first assess their communities, and based on those findings select one to two outcomes from each domain as the intended outcomes of their efforts, as described on page 13 of the FOA.

On page 16 of the FOA, it states: "awardees are expected to demonstrate measurable progress toward applicant-identified outcomes..." Who is the "applicant" in this statement? Is it the Component 2 applicant or is the awardee the component 2 applicant and the "other" applicant the Tribal Nation?

The applicant is the component 2 awardee.

Is it expected that component 2 recipients distribute sub-grantee awards in year 1?

Yes, it is expected in year one for component 2 recipients to provide sub-awards to area tribes, as appropriate to carry out component 1 intervention and evaluation strategies.

Will National 501c3 tribal organizations applying for Component 2 be expected to serve half plus 1 of all Tribes; meaning 284 of the 566 Federally Recognized Tribes?

No, National 501c3 tribal organizations applying under component 2 must represent half plus one of the tribes within the specific IHS Administrative Area where the applicant organization is physically located.  

 

What in regards to the Community Needs Assessment should be done in the first year, in regards to these 7 items?

Under the leadership and guidance of the Tribal Organization, tribes will be looking at their specific needs and gaps and opportunities, and where they can begin to address some of the health issues addressed by the FOA through the strategies that are provided in Component 1.  The first year can be an intense period of understanding for each tribe, where the most need is and where the opportunities are to start implementing the kinds of activities that are supported under this FOA.

I have a question regarding sub-awards under Component 2.  If a Tribal Organization were to be awarded funding, and wanted to provide sub-awards to a tribe or tribes who had not been awarded a grant under Component 1, is that acceptable?

Yes, that is acceptable and is encouraged. The expectation under Component 2 is that Tribal Organizations will be working with the tribes in their IHS Administrative Area to stimulate and ignite the kinds of activities that would be supported under Component 1. So we would like to see small financial support to tribes to instigate that kind of activity.

My question is related to the Strategic Planning in Year 1. Are there any limitations or restrictions to move forward with implementation sometime during Year 1? Can you begin those activities or are we bound to set aside that first year for Strategic Planning?

You may absolutely move forward with implementation in Year 1.

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Evaluation


 

On page 46 of the FOA under organizational capacity (Component 2) there is a bullet point which reads, "Describe how it will evaluate the proposed program strategies for continuous program improvement and reaching performance outcomes." Are you speaking about component 2 awardees evaluating their own approaches or are you speaking about component 2 awardees evaluating and making improvement to the Tribes' programs?

The applicant should describe how they will evaluate their proposed program strategies.

Should the applicant submit an evaluation plan? If so, are there guidelines as to what it should cover?

Applicants must provide an overall evaluation and management measurement plan that is consistent with the CDC evaluation and performance measurement strategies for either Component 1 or 2. The plan must:

  • Describe how key program partners will be engaged in the evaluation and performance measurement planning processes, including collaboration with Tribal Epidemiology Centers.
  • Describe the type of evaluations to be conducted (i.e., process and/or outcome).
  • Describe the intended populations, which may be the entire community.
  • Describe key evaluation questions to be answered.
  • Describe potentially available data sources.
  • Describe examples of data collection instruments related to the intended populations and respective interventions planned.
  • Describe how evaluation findings will be used for continuous program and quality improvement.
  • Describe how evaluation and performance measurement will contribute to our understanding of the advantages and challenges of working collaboratively across categorical programs to achieve overall health outcomes and disease- and risk factor-specific outcomes.

Include a single, tribe- or tribal organization-specific Logic Model describing the collaborative approach being proposed to work toward the outcomes specified on the overall CDC program Logic Model.

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Scoring


 

Are voting panelist given the abstract, narrative, work plan and other allowable attachments?

The review process has two parts: 1. Reviewers- Reviewers have access to all documents and use those documents as a strong burden of proof for their review summary. 2. Voting panelist- Voting panels have access to all documents, however their associated scores weigh largely from the reviewers summary of strengths and weaknesses, and associated scores based on each section.

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Other


 

What are the lobbying restrictions concerning this grant? Can a 501(c)(3) organization conduct lobbying activities and apply for a grant?

Federal funds cannot be used for lobbying. Successful applicants must comply with the requirements set out in Section 503, Division F, Title V, FY12 Consolidated Appropriations Act and Additional Requirement (AR) 12, which is CDC policy as well as a term and condition of the FOA with respect to lobbying restrictions placed on award recipients.

In addition, please note that grantee activities are not restricted under Section 503 if the grantee is using funding sources other than Federal appropriations to engage in those activities. At the same time, grantee activities may be limited by state law or other applicable restrictions, such as provisions in the Internal Revenue Code. Grantees may wish to consult their tax and/or accounting advisors for assistance.

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