Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Funding Opportunity Announcement: National Implementation and Dissemination for Chronic Disease Prevention (DP14-1418)

Please continue to check this FAQ page where responses will be posted as questions are received. Please check questions similar to ones you submitted, since not all questions will be posted verbatim and responses may be combined.

Click on the FAQ topic headings below to view an expanded list of questions and responses.

 

CDC appreciates your interest in this funding opportunity announcement. The FAQ section of the National Implementation and Dissemination for Chronic Disease Prevention (DP14-1418) is where questions and answers from the past 12 weeks are posted. Unfortunately, the deadline to submit questions through our website was July 14, 2014 at 11:59 p.m. U.S. Eastern Daylight Time. We regret that we are no longer able to respond to questions.

For questions related to application submission please refer to the FOA. For all other questions please review the FAQ section of National Implementation and Dissemination for Chronic Disease Prevention (DP14-1418).

 

CDC has received several questions asking about how to conduct a specific activity or task or what type of interventions would be appropriate for the FOA. These include questions such as:

  1. Please give an example of a "point of sale” communication strategy.
  2. Will CDC provide more information on an appropriate scope of work for the individual strategies?

We regret that we are unable to respond to these kinds of questions. The purpose of the FAQs is to provide clarification on the funding opportunity announcement, not to provide specific technical assistance.

Frequently Asked Questions

General

Purpose

Eligibility

Funding

Application Process

Scoring

Recipient Activities

Evaluation

Other

General


 

 

Can cohorts be defined by population and/or geographic region?

Yes. As long as each cohort is comprised of a different set of chapters/affiliates. Both cohorts should be comprised of 15-20 sub-recipients, and will be funded for two years. Cohort #1 will run from 2014-2016. Cohort #2 will run from 2015-2017.

Does staffing have to be new and entirely dedicated staff, or can it be existing staff with percentage time allocated to the program?

No. Staff can be newly hired or existing staff. The awardee must, however, have dedicated staff for the positions listed on page 13 of the FOA.

Is tobacco cessation separate from tobacco prevention?  

CDC cannot respond to this question. The purpose of the FAQs is to provide clarification on the funding opportunity announcement, not to provide specific technical assistance.

Are Category A applicants required to have experience administering grants to local agencies; if yes, can an applicant partner with another organization that has grant administration experience?

No to both questions; however, applicants must, demonstrate the ability to fund, monitor, and support their own sub-recipients in the activities listed on pages 15-16 of the FOA.

Can an awardee concentrate on strategies within one risk factor?

Yes. Awardees are allowed to focus on one risk factor.

Does the awardee have to implement all of the strategies listed under the risk factors on pages 18 and 19?

No. Category A applicants may select one or more risk factor(s), but they are not required to implement all of the strategies listed. The list provided on pages 18 and 19 include examples of suggested evidence-based strategies.

Please clarify the role of Category A awardees in providing technical assistance.

Category A awardees will be expected to serve as a first line of technical support to the sub-recipients. Category B awardees will provide more detailed and community-specific technical support, including tools and other resources, for the Category A sub-recipients.

Should a Category A applicant coordinate with a Category B applicant during the application process?

No. It is not necessary for Category A and Category B applicants to coordinate efforts during the application process. However, Category A and B awardees will be expected to coordinate after funds have been awarded.

Is there a list somewhere of organizations who submitted an LOI?

No. CDC will not list the names of organizations that submitted an LOI.

Can a national organization that has chosen Category B include elements of Category A in its application? If so, can CDC provide examples of what might be accepted?

Category B applicants will be expected to conduct the individual Category B activities outlined on pages 20 -23 of the FOA and the joint Category A and B activities on page 20. There should be no other duplication of Category A activities by a Category B awardee.

Can an applicant change categories after the CDC receives the Letter of Intent (indicating to apply as either Category A or B)?

No. The applicant's category must match the category selected in the original LOI.

Are there any resources that can help applicants identify their "priority populations" (e.g., income, education, racial/ethnic background, etc.)?

Yes. Applicants may access these data using this recommended website, www.communitycommons.org/chi-planning, and selecting the tab “Access Target Area Intervention Tool” (Note that this website requires users to log in with a user ID and password). Data can also be found on the Census Bureau website: http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/community_facts.xhtml.

How will Category B awardees know how to coordinate with Category A to distribute the curricula?

According to page 22 of the FOA, Category B awardees will meet with CDC and other Category B awardees to determine how the work will be coordinated, within 30 days of award.  

Are Category A awardees required to pay for sub-recipient travel and meeting space?

Yes. Category A awardees will pay for their sub-recipients' travel to required meetings and will collaborate with other Category A and B awardees to pay for meeting space and other logistics.

Can the same organization submit 2 separate applications for the same category?

No.

Do we need to implement a competitive process for selecting sub-recipients?

Organizations must follow and  use their own internal procedures, competitive or otherwise, for selecting sub-recipients but must ensure their policies adhere to applicable Federal law and the guidance outlined in 45 CFR, Part 74 and 92.

Does this program duplicate other CDC funded activities? How will you ensure there is no duplication?

No. CDC will work with awardees to ensure there are no duplicative CDC funded activities and that all CDC funded activities are complementary and synergistic. This will occur through monitoring the work of CDC awardees and consulting with fellow CDC divisions and programs.

How will program activities be sustained at the end of the funding period?

In Year 1, both Category A and B awardees are encouraged to develop sustainability plans that detail how they will ensure that their collaborations, partnerships, and population-based strategies will be continued beyond this program’s funding. Additionally, Category A sub-recipients are encouraged to develop similar sustainability plans within their first year of funding to ensure that local population-based improvements are continued. Funds received under this FOA should supplement, not supplant, existing activities.

How many awards will be made?

There will be two to four awards for Category A; and two to four awards for Category B, respectively.  

What are the two components of this FOA? Can I apply for both components?

National organizations will be funded under two different categories: 1) Category A – Community Building and Implementation, and 2) Category B – Dissemination and Training.

National organizations can only apply for one category. However, National Organizations may be sub-awardees on applications from other primary applicant National Organizations, provided there is no duplication of funded activities.

What is the project period for the awards?

The project period begins September 30, 2014 and ends September 29, 2017.

What is the start date for the awards?

The proposed award start date is September 30, 2014.

Is it acceptable to have two lead organizations (one of which is applicant/fiscal agent)? If so, is it acceptable to have co-Principal Investigators (PIs)? If not, does the PI need to be a staff member of the fiscal agent agency?

No. It is not acceptable.  All awardees will be national organizations; as such they should have sufficient staff, experience, and resources to manage their award.  

Awardees may have as many co-PIs as they wish, but CDC will only acknowledge one of the PIs as the primary lead. PIs must be a staff of the fiscal agent entity.  

Is direct assistance (DA) for personnel available through this FOA?

Direct assistance is not available through this FOA.

Do Category A sub-recipients need to be selected and identified prior to submitting the application?

Sub-recipients do not have to be selected prior to the start of the project period.  Applicants must, however, describe their process for identifying, selecting, funding, and supporting their sub-recipients within their applications.  All sub-recipients will require CDC approval prior to their funding.

Is there a minimum target population size or location (for example, neighborhoods, communities, cities, states, multi-state)?

There is no ideal target population size or geographic location sub-recipients should reach. Instead, sub-recipients should implement strategies that reach at least 50% of the targeted community at large.

How will this Funding Opportunity Announcement build upon previous CDC Community Health initiatives?

This FOA builds upon the Division of Community Health’s (DCH) history of working with national organizations to provide financial resources, guidance, training, tools, and other assistance to local coalitions interested in creating communities where all people can achieve optimal health through developing their capacity to implement policy, systems, and environmental improvements. The new FOA will allow awardees to build capacity for implementing and implement population-based strategies that address the greatest predictors of chronic disease (i.e., heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and obesity), namely tobacco use and exposure, poor nutrition, physical inactivity, and lack of access to chronic disease prevention, risk reduction and management opportunities.

Can funds be used to support research?

No.

Can grantees collaborate with Prevention Research Centers on activities, such as evaluation, even though this is a non-research FOA?

Yes, awardees can collaborate with Prevention Research Centers on activities, such as evaluation.

Define health equity as it relates to this FOA.

Health equity is attainment of the highest level of health for all people.  Achieving health equity requires valuing everyone equally with focused and ongoing societal efforts to address avoidable inequalities, historical and contemporary injustices, and the elimination of health and healthcare disparities.  (source:  http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/npa/templates/browse.aspx?lvl=1&lvlid=34 ) Health inequity as it relates to this FOA requires a strategy combining population-wide and high-risk approaches (dual action).  The application should promote integrated approaches, evidence-based programs and best practices to reduce these disparities.

For the purposes of this FOA, how do you define infrastructure?

An infrastructure change includes establishing systems, procedures, and protocols within communities, institutions, and networks that support healthy behaviors. This includes improving linkages among service agencies, public health, and public health care systems. Note that funding from this FOA cannot be used for construction and/or modernization projects.

The call in number and participant passcode is the same number and time/date for CDC FOA-DP14-1419PPHF14 (REACH). Is this a mistype for both funding opportunities? Is there a new number for CDC-RFA-DP14-1418 (National Implementation & Dissemination for Chronic Disease Prevention)?

The Informational conference call for potential applicants for CDC-RFA-DP14-1418 (National Implementation & Dissemination for Chronic Disease Prevention) is Call-in number is 888-955-8965 (toll free), Participant passcode: 9658383; May 30, 2014 from 1:30 - 3:00 p.m. U.S. Eastern Daylight time.

 

Top of Page

Purpose


 

What is the purpose of the new Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA)?

The purpose to this FOA will fund national organizations to implement, evaluate, and disseminate evidence- and practice-based community health activities that will build local-level capacity and implement population-based strategies to prevent and reduce chronic diseases, reduce health disparities, and develop a stronger evidence-base for effective prevention programming. National organizations will be funded in two categories, Category A and Category B. Category A and B awardees will work individually and collectively to implement this FOA.

What are the anticipated outcomes of this FOA?

  1. Short-term Outcomes – Category A awardees and sub-recipients will be expected to build community infrastructure to complete population-based efforts, that include:
    1. Increased collaboration between national and community partners
    2. Increased community capacity to implement policy, systems, and environmental improvements (e.g., multi-sectorial coalition, community data, community action plan CAP)
    3. Increased messages on the importance of policy, systems, and environmental improvements
  2. Intermediate Outcomes - Category A awardees will be expected to ensure that their sub-recipients measure and report short-term outcomes [see bullets (1.) – (4.) below] that are relevant to the chronic disease risk factors that are the focus of their community action plans. Outcomes (1.) through (4.) are referred to as “awardee reach” or the estimated number of people with access to healthier environments and opportunities. CDC will provide guidance on estimating sub-recipient reach, after awards are made.  Intermediate outcome (5.) is optional at the discretion of the Category A awardee. CDC will aggregate Category A awardees and their sub-recipients’ intermediate outcome data as part of the National Organization Evaluation Plan. Intermediate-term outcomes include:
    1. Increased access to smoke-free or tobacco-free environments;  
    2. Increased access to environments with healthy food or beverage options;
    3. Increased access to physical activity opportunities;
    4. Increased opportunities for chronic disease prevention, risk reduction or management through clinical and community linkages; and
    5. Positive changes in attitudes, beliefs, knowledge, awareness, and behavioral intentions for relevant strategies (optional outcome)
  3. Long-Term Outcomes - As part of the National Organization Evaluation Plan, CDC will be responsible for measuring long-term outcomes.  Because available data are typically not adequate to measure these changes in an individual community, CDC will identify communities with similar strategies and aggregate available data (e.g., from BRFSS) from multiple communities, as possible. In larger communities, adequate data may be available for awardees to assess long-term outcomes. Long-term outcomes include:
    1. Reduced exposure to secondhand smoke;
    2. Increased daily consumption of fruit;
    3. Increased daily consumption of vegetables;
    4. Increased consumption of healthy beverages;
    5. Increased physical activity; and
    6. Increased use of community-based resources related to better control of chronic disease
  4. Impact - As part of the National Organization Evaluation Plan, CDC will be responsible for estimating impact. CDC will model changes in impact based on performance monitoring and intermediate outcome data. Impact includes:
    1. Reduce rates of death and disability due to tobacco use by 5%;
    2. Reduce prevalence of obesity by 3%; and
    3. Reduced rates of death and disability due to diabetes, heart disease, and stroke by 3% in the implementation area

Top of Page

 

Eligibility


 

Must our partner be listed as the lead applicant since they have bylaws?

Yes, if your partner has the appropriate documentation in their by- laws, they should be listed as the lead organization (pg. 34). Category A and B organizations must demonstrate evidence of having members, affiliates, and/or chapters within twenty-five (25) or more U.S. states and territories by submitting a copy of their organization’s bylaws.  

Is the funding range total costs or direct costs only?

The proposed average one-year amount includes total costs for the budget period.

Does each affiliate have to be named in the national organization's by-laws and/or show each state where affiliates are located?

Category A and B organizations must demonstrate evidence of having members, affiliates and/or chapters within twenty-five (25) or more U.S. states and territories by submitting a copy of their organization’s bylaws. The bylaws may or may not include a list of the individual members, chapters and affiliates and their locations but should be descriptive enough to show evidence that they have members, affiliates and/or chapters within U.S. states and territories.

Who is eligible to apply for funding?

This cooperative agreement is limited to national organizations (to include nonprofit and for-profit organizations) that serve communities across the nation.

Are previous REACH or CTG awardees able to apply?

The application is open to all national organizations that serve communities across the nation.

Is there a preference in this FOA for organizations that have received funding through the Division of Community Health’s programs in the past?

No.

Are non-profits which are not designated as a 501(c)(3) organization eligible to apply?

Yes

May a non-profit foundation with a 501(c)(3) designation serve as the applicant organization on behalf of an organization that does not have this designation?

No.

Can an organization be both the lead applicant on an application as well as be included as a pre-selected sub-recipient in a different grant application?

Yes, although all federal grant policy restrictions must be adhered to and FOA requirements must be met.

Top of Page

 

Funding


 

Does an applicant organization comprised of regional divisions, nationwide meet the criteria of chapters/affiliates to which an awardee can distribute funds to support coalition building?

An applicant organization that is structured through divisions must still be able to demonstrate evidence of having members, affiliates and/or chapters within twenty-five (25) or more U.S. states and territories.

Once established, are coalition members considered sub-recipients and allowed to distribute funding?

Category A awardees will distribute money to their directly-funded sub-recipients; not to individual coalition members. Organizations must follow and use their own internal procedures, competitive or otherwise, for selecting sub-recipients but must ensure their policies adhere to applicable Federal law and the guidance outlined in 45 CFR, Part 74 and 92.

Can any of the CDC funding be redistributed to the awardee’s current (or future) partners?

Awardees must use their organization’s process for identifying and funding their sub-recipients, some of whom may or may not be partners.

Please explain the 75% requirement, given the definitions of that requirement are different on pages 3 and 11.

Per page 11 of the FOA, Category A awardees must use at least 75% of their annual awards to fund two 2-year groups of 15-20 chapters/affiliates (sub-recipients). At least 75% of Category A awardee’s annual award must be awarded to the sub-recipients.

Please explain the annual funding amount for each year.

Per FOA requirements, no less than 75% of the total annual award must be awarded to sub-recipients. The actual dollar amounts for cohort 1 and cohort 2 do not need to be the same. In year three, Category A recipients will also use funds to support the joint training efforts as described in the FOA pages 9, 11, 12, and 20. Funds for the training in year three count towards meeting the 75% requirement for that year.

Should the budget and budget justification be for one year?

Yes. The applicant should submit a detailed year one budget and a general overarching budget for years 2 and 3 as described on pages 32 and 42 of the FOA.

Can you define clinical care? Is this definition inclusive of health education, lactation consultants, or healthy habit follow-up management (e.g. Sweet Success program activities)?

Funds cannot be used to pay for clinical care (i.e., health care services delivered by a health care provider such as counseling, screening, treatment) or other direct services (e.g. other health education).

Can you define direct services?

In general, a direct service relates to the delivery of one-on-one or one-on-small group services. For example, using funds to pay the salary of a community health worker/representative to provide a service to individuals, or free transportation to individuals participating in a program would be an inappropriate use of federal funds and are not within the scope of this FOA. However use of funds related to a programmatic activity resulting in policy, environmental, or systems improvements are allowable. For example, the use of funds to train a multi-disciplinary team, including community health workers/representative, to increase cultural competencies is allowable.

How much funding is available for the FOA?

The approximate total fiscal year funding available is $10 million. The total project funding is $30 million.

When will funds be made available to award recipients?

The funds will be made available to award recipients on September 30, 2014.  

What will be the average funding award for awardees?

The approximate average amount of funding available for this FOA is $2,000,000 - $3,000,000 for Category A, and $200,000 - $500,000 for Category B.

Can I apply for more than the ceiling listed in the FOA?

No.

Are PPHF funds used to support this FOA?

No.

Should travel costs for required meetings be included in the budget?

Yes, travel costs for required meetings should be included in the budget.

Are matching funds required?

No.

Can funds in this FOA be used to purchase: 1) video-conferencing equipment, recording and streaming equipment and other interactive learning tools that can be used for community education and outreach on chronic disease, and; 2) telemedicine equipment that can be utilized in the community and in schools to provide patient counseling and guidance on chronic disease prevention and management?

According to 2CFR225, Appendix A and Appendix B, Selected Items of Cost, items 11 and 15, the acquisition costs of “special purpose equipment” (see definition below) are allowable as direct charges if it is determined to be necessary for the CDC project. However, in this instance, video conferencing and telemedicine equipment do not align with or support the population-based approach described in the FOA, and therefore would not be approved for purchase with CDC funds. Grantees may work with partners to pursue other sources of funding for this equipment if desired.
“Special purpose equipment” means equipment, which is used only for research, medical, scientific, or other technical activities. Examples of special purpose equipment include microscopes, x-ray machines, surgical instruments, and spectrometers.

Can funds be used for construction?

This program is not authorized to conduct construction and/or modernization projects. Construction projects are applicable only to "construction" funding opportunity announcements under the Public Health Service Act (PHSA), Section 307(b)(10) [Section 307(b)(10)]. This authority does not apply to "program" specific FOA's. Therefore, recipients may not use funding for construction (including, but not limited to, labor or materials). Funds may be used, for example, to assess support for a community initiative and educate community members, educate intervention population members, identify requirements for facilities, and conduct planning in preparation for construction. Any funds used for construction purposes would need to be provided by another source.

Will funding be available to build capacity?

Individually, Category A awardees will each provide funding for capacity building and implementation and will provide on-going technical assistance to two (2) cohorts of 15-20 sub-recipients. For Category A sub-recipients, funding will support the creation or enhancement of local coalitions, supplement local data through a community assessment process, and implementation of evidence- and practice-based strategies that address previously-identified community gaps and needs in multiple settings in order to reduce the prevalence of chronic disease and their risk factors.  In order to improve chronic disease outcomes related to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and obesity at the local level, Category A sub-recipients will develop or strengthen their coalitions and examine community needs assessment information in the first six months of the sub award. These funded chapters/affiliates will then have 15-months to implement PSE strategies that have both broad reach and moderate to large effects on chronic disease risk factors. Strategies should focus, at a minimum, on one of the following four chronic disease risk factors or community conditions in each setting:

  1. Tobacco use and exposure,
  2. Poor nutrition,
  3. Physical inactivity, and
  4. Lack of access to chronic disease prevention, risk reduction, and management opportunities.

For Category A applicants, is there a requirement as to how much funding I sub-award?

Yes.  Each Category A awardee must distribute at least 75% of their award to their sub-recipients.

.

Top of Page

 

Application Process


 

An applicant sent an LOI to the wrong FOA email address (e.g., sent to PICH Orgs rather than PICH).  Will CDC assign the LOI to the correct FOA?

Yes. As long as the LOI was clearly labeled

To whom should Letters of Support be addressed?

Letters of support should be addressed to the Procurement and Grants Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

What should be included in the 25 page limit and is there a page limit for the attachments?

There is a 25-page limit for the project narrative, which includes the work plan and evaluation plan. Additional attachments as stated on page59 (e.g., CVs/Resumes, Organizational Charts/Evidence of Organizational Capacity, Letters of Involvement, and Letters of Support) do not count towards the 25-page limit for the narrative. Content appropriate for the Evidence of Organizational Capacity is an allowable attachment and would include items found on (pages 49) such as media reports, news/magazine articles, op-eds, community newsletters and as evidence of possessing the characteristics listed on page50. There is no page limit for additional attachments listed in the FOA.

Applicants proposing a strategy in a new population or setting are required to conduct an outcome evaluation. However, the outcome evaluation portion of the plan is not required in the application, and should be submitted within 30 days after finalizing the CAP with the Project Officer.

Does CDC anticipate receiving many applications and will it be competitive?

CDC does not know how many organizations will apply at this time. This is a competitive funding opportunity announcement.

Can CDC provide the correct web link to the Target Intervention Area Tool?

The correct link is: www.communitycommons.org/chi-planning.[Note: This web site requires users to log in with a userid and password]. These data can alternatively be obtained from the census bureau: http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/community_facts.xhtml.

When are applications due, and when will awards be announced?

The applications are due July 22, 2014, 11:59 p.m. U.S. Eastern Daylight Time, on www.grants.gov.  The awards are scheduled to begin September 30, 2014.  

How can people ask questions about the FOA?

Questions can be submitted via the FOA webpage: www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/about/PICHORGS.

Are applicants required to submit Letters of Support/Involvement?

No. Letters of Support are not required. However, applicants must provide materials (per page 28) which demonstrate their capacity and established relationships to perform this work.

Should the letters of support be sent directly to CDC and to whom?

Letters of support can be a part your application to demonstrate the level of commitment from collaborating and partnering organizations.

How will a grantee know if their LOI was received?

If the LOI is sent through the email box referenced in the FOA, a confirmation reply with be sent.

Is there a page limit for the project narrative?

Yes, there is a 25-page limit for the project narrative.

Is the budget included as part of the total page limit for applications? Is there a page limit specific to the budget narrative?

No, the budget is not included as a part of the total page limit.  No, there is not a page limit specific to the budget narrative.

Should the Work Plan be included in the narrative or as an attachment? Do attachments count towards the 25-page limit for the narrative?

The Work Plan should be included in the project narrative’s 25 pages.  No, attachments do not count towards the 25-page limit for the narrative.

Will the conference call meeting notes be available to those unable to make the call?

Yes, the scripts from the conference calls will be made available online: www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/about/PICHORGS.

Are applicants required to submit detailed budgets for sub-awardees as a part of the application?

No.

Top of Page

 

Scoring


 

What type of review process will occur for this competition?

Applications will undergo a three-phase review process.  Phase I, CDC staff and PGO will review the applications for initial completeness.  Phase II, a review panel will evaluate eligible applications in accordance with the “Criteria” section of the FOA.  Phase III, the Selecting Official shall rely on the rank order established by the objective review as the primary factor in making awards.  the applications will be reviewed to ensure that they contain the following:

  • Geography.  The intent is to fund awards in a manner that achieves geographic diversity across applicants.
  • Diversity of eligible applicants.  The intent is to fund applicants representing a variety of national organizations serving communities across the nation.   
  • Project focus.  The intent is to balance awards across eligible categories serving the primary focus areas (tobacco use and exposure; poor nutrition; physical inactivity; and lack of access to chronic disease prevention, risk reduction and management opportunities) to assure that no single focus is significantly underserved in comparison with other foci.

Where are the application review criteria in the FOA?

The application review criteria are located in Section E – Application Review Information criteria can be found on page 48 of the FOA.  

Top of Page

 

Recipient Activities


 

On page 16 of the FOA, does the post-award timeline for Category A sub-recipients begin when Category A National Organization awardees are funded, or when Category A sub-recipients are funded?

The timeline for Category A sub-recipients begins once the sub-recipients receive funding.

Please clarify if Category A sub-recipients are the target audience for the Category B awardees' training activities and if Category B applicants need to specify target audience(s) for training and/or dissemination activities.

Yes. Category A sub-recipients are the target audience for the Category B awardees' training activities. Category B awardees will develop and provide trainings and tools to support Category A sub-recipient activities and strategies.

Should Category A awardees expect to use Year 3 funds for collaborative efforts with Category B awardees?

Yes. In year 3, Category A awardees will be expected to use their funding to collaborate with Category B awardees to convene a joint training and to collaborate on joint communication and dissemination efforts.

What are the lobbying restrictions concerning this grant?  Can a 501(c)(3) organization conduct lobbying activities and apply for a grant?

Federal funds cannot be used for lobbying.  Successful applicants must comply with the Anti-lobbying requirements set forth in Section 503, Division F, Title V, FY12 Consolidated Appropriations Act and CDC’s Additional Requirement (AR)12, which is  a term and condition of this FOA.

In addition, please note that the grantee is not restricted to engage in those activities under Section 503 if the grantee is using funding sources other than Federal appropriations unless the grantee activities are otherwise limited by state law or other applicable restrictions, such as provisions in the Internal Revenue Code.  Grantees may wish to consult with their tax and/or accounting advisors for assistance.  
For additional information, please refer to Anti Lobbying Restrictions for CDC Grantees at http://www.cdc.gov/od/pgo/funding/grants/Anti-Lobbying_Restrictions_for_CDC_Grantees_July_2012.pdf [PDF 509KB].

What kinds of activities will awardees conduct?

This FOA supports two funding level categories:  Category A – Community Building and Implementation, and Category B – Dissemination and Training.  Applicants may not apply for both categories. Pg. 38

Collectively, Category A and B awardees will implement communication and dissemination activities to address larger societal issues related to tobacco use and exposure, poor nutrition, physical inactivity, lack of access to chronic disease prevention, and risk reduction, and management opportunities. Additionally, they will collaborate in convening joint trainings and disseminating key messages and success stories.

Individually, Category A awardees will each provide funding for capacity building and implementation and will provide on-going technical assistance to two (2) cohorts of 15-20 sub-recipients. For Category A sub-recipients, funding will support the creation or enhancement of local coalitions, supplement local data thru a community assessment process, and implementation of evidence- and practice-based strategies that address previously-identified community gaps and needs in multiple settings in order to reduce the prevalence of chronic disease and their risk factors.  

Category B awardees will develop and provide trainings and tools to support Category A sub-recipient activities and strategies. Additionally, Category B awardees will use their award and other resources to develop and disseminate national and local stories that detail the importance of this work and the progress and lessons learned from community work conducted under this funding opportunity.

For a listing of more specific activities under each category, please refer to the National Organization FOA. (see pages 10-18 of FOA for a complete listing of activities)

Top of Page

 

Evaluation


 

Are site visits to each sub-recipient required as part of the Evaluation and Performance Measurement Plan?

No. Site visits are encouraged but not required. Awardees should prioritize site visits based upon their sub-recipients' needs and to ensure that monitoring requirements on pages 10 and 15 of the FOA are fulfilled.

Should the applicant submit an evaluation plan?

Yes. The evaluation plan must contain the following: (pg. 31 of FOA):

  • Describe how key program partners will be engaged in the evaluation and performance measurement planning processes.
  • Describe the type of evaluations to be conducted (i.e., process and/or outcome).
  • Describe key evaluation questions to be answered.
  • Describe other information, as determined by the CDC program (e.g., performance measures to be developed by the applicant) that must be included.
  • Describe potentially available data sources and feasibility of collecting appropriate evaluation and performance data.
  • Describe how evaluation findings will be used for continuous program and quality improvement.
  • Describe how evaluation and performance measurement will contribute to development of that evidence base, where program strategies are being employed that lack a strong evidence base of effectiveness.

Awardees will be required to submit a more detailed evaluation and performance measurement plan within the first six months of the project, as outlined in the reporting section of the FOA. (pgs. 40-42 of FOA)

  • Implementing the National Evaluation Plan which is based on the four levels of outcome measures.
    1. Aggregating short-term outcomes across Category A sub-recipients by strategies, as appropriate.
    2. Measuring intermediate-term outcomes.  Intermediate-term outcomes will reflect changes in targeted health-related behaviors (see outcome measures, above) at the population level.   Because available data are typically not adequate to measure these changes in an individual community, CDC will identify communities whose strategies have similar objectives and aggregate available data (e.g., BRFSS) for multiple communities, as possible.
    3. Modeling long-term outcomes from Category A sub-recipients Performance Monitoring and Reach data.
    4. Modeling impact from awardee performance monitoring data and awardee reach data.

Top of Page

 

Other


 

Are the staff persons listed on pg. 13 of the FOA required to be staff of the fiscal agent?

Evaluators may be contractors, however all other positions must be staff of the awardee. (Note: Applicants must serve as their own fiscal agents).

Do all positions have to be physically located at the awardee's national office?

No. Staff does not have to be physically located at the organization's national office.

Pre-Application Call Questions

Do Category A awardees have to implement a competitive process to determine their sub-recipients?

Organizations must follow and use their own internal procedures, competitive or otherwise, for selecting sub-recipients but must ensure their policies adhere to applicable Federal law and the guidance outlined in 45 CFR, Part 74 and 92.

Will funded organizations be expected to work with their chapters/affiliates in at least 25 states?

No. However, category A awardees will be expected to fund two cohorts of 15 to 20 chapters/affiliates.

Are organizations that do not have chapters/affiliates in at least 25 states eligible to apply for this funding?

No. Category A and B organizations must demonstrate evidence of having members, affiliates and/or chapters within 25 or more U.S. states and territories.

Is submitting the bylaws the only way to demonstrate evidence of having members, affiliates and/or chapters? Are there other ways to provide evidence or demonstrate being a national organization?

A variety of documents may be provided (e.g. minutes, coalition roster) to document the length of time a coalition has been in existence.

Can an organization be identified as a sub-recipient or affiliate for both Categories A and B?

Yes. Although a sub-recipient can work across multiple grants or cooperative agreements, the work cannot be duplicative.

Is there an ideal population size which a sub-recipient should target?

No. Sub-recipients can choose to work with any size community (e.g., rural, small, large, etc.), but they must implement strategies that will reach at least 50% of that targeted community.  

Since it may take at least 30 days for an awardee to have their sub-contractors approved after the FOA is awarded, would it be advantageous for organizations to identify sub-contractors in advance?

Yes. If would be advantageous for organizations to identify sub-contractors in advance, if all required elements outlined in the budget guidelines document are included within the applicant’s budget. However, additional points will not be awarded for having contractors identified at the time the application is submitted.

What is the definition of “community” as it relates to this FOA?

For purposes of this FOA a community is defined as a geographic area that encompasses a population. For example, a community may be defined as a city, town, county, municipality, or geographic region.  A community for this FOA is not defined by or limited to membership, group affiliation, attendance, etc.

Is there a difference in Category A sub-recipient cohorts (#1 and #2)? What are the two year periods for each of the cohorts of 15-20 chapters/affiliates?

Yes. Each cohort will be comprised of a different set of chapters/affiliates. Both cohorts will be funded for two years.  Cohort #1 will run from 2014-2016. Cohort #2 will run from 2015-2017.  

Are the funding levels the same in each of the three years of the opportunity?

Yes. The funding levels are the same for each year.

Is the work plan template available electronically?

Yes. The work plan will be posted to the CDC FOA Website.

Are awardees or CDC responsible for measuring short-term, intermediate, and long-term outcomes?

Awardees will be required to report short-term outcomes, as well as intermediate outcomes associated with reach (increased access). CDC will be responsible for measuring the long-term outcomes.

Will organizations be restricted from selecting sub-recipients that were previously funded by other DCH FOAs?

No. There will be no restrictions.

Can local governmental entities such as a local park and recreation center be funded as a sub-recipient?

Yes. Sub-recipients can be local entities.

Are evaluators required to be staff from the national organization or can they be contractors?

Funded organizations may use contracted evaluators.

What is the definition of “limited experience and/or capacity of” of sub-recipients?

Category A awardees may fund sub-recipient chapters/affiliates that have limited experience and/or capacity in working with multi-sectoral coalitions on community improvement initiatives. Some examples of “limited experience and/or capacity” are those chapters or affiliates with limited staff or partner groups, that lack data or experience, have been operational for less than two years, and/or have had limited success to data.

Regarding the positions listed on page 13 of the FOA, are awardees required to have a 1.0 Full-time Employee (FTE) for each staffing position listed?

No. The only full-time requirement of 1.0 FTE is for the Program Manager/Coordinator position.

Is the CDC interested in using this cooperative agreement to only fund national organizations addressing specific racial and ethnic health disparities?

No. CDC is not limiting the populations or communities where awardees work.

Are “collective impact” organizations encouraged to apply?

CDC is looking for national organizations (non-profit and for-profit) that serve communities. The national organization must have evidence of members, affiliates or chapters in 25 U.S. states or territories.

How will the two cohorts for Category A receive funding?

Category A awardees should have in place two-year agreements for Cohort 1 in year one and Cohort 2 in year two.  Each cohort will receive 75% of their two-year award in the first year and the remaining 25% in their second year.

Would an organization that actively represents tribal governments be eligible to apply knowing that tribal governments are not necessarily members, affiliates or chapters underneath a national organization?

CDC will fund national organizations that have bylaws and other elements in place. The applicant must have representation and resolutions from tribes in 25 U.S. states that empower the organization to represent them as the awardee.

Does it matter if organizations target youth, adults, or both populations?

No. There are no limits.

Is a church organization operating in 25 states eligible to apply?

Yes. The church must have resolutions with members/chapters/affiliates in 25 states to be eligible.

Are coalitions serving small communities, encouraged to apply?  Or is this for large communities serving a larger number of residents?

This FOA provides direct funding to national organizations who work with their local affiliates.

Can an organization apply for both Category A and Category B?

No. A national organization can only apply for one, not both categories.

What is the definition of affiliate?

A national organization’s affiliate is a subordinate organization whose mission and established governance, bylaws, policies, procedures, and activities are responsive to and in direct alignment with those of a national parent organization.

Can an organization be the lead for Category A and propose to partner or be a sub-recipient of Category B?

Yes.

Is there a limit to how many organizations an awardee can partner or be listed as sub-recipient with?

No. There is no limit. However, there should be no duplication of services.

What is required to be included in the Letter of Intent (LOI)?

See page 38 of the FOA. The LOI should include the following:

  • Name, address, telephone number, and email address of the Principal Investigator or Project Director, or both
  • Name, address, telephone number, and e-mail address of the primary contact for writing and submitting this application
  • Number and title of this FOA
  • The category for which they are applying. (Note organizations can only apply for funding under Category A or B – not both)
  • Organizations should also indicate which areas (counties, cities, communities) they are planning to target through their sub-award process.

Top of Page

 
Contact Us:
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP)
    4770 Buford Hwy, NE
    MS F-76
    Atlanta, GA 30341-3717
  • 8am-8pm ET
    Monday-Friday
    Closed Holidays
  • Page last reviewed: May 7, 2014
  • Page last updated: July 21, 2014
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC-INFO