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When mom drives me a short distance to a friend's house or school, I don't always wear my seatbelt. Is it worth it for such a short car ride?

I take the shortcut through the park to get to my friend's house. I never see anyone back there, so it must be safe, right?

I am on my way to play some soccer and my cleats are worn down. Plus, the grass is wet from last night's rain. Is it still OK to play? I mean, cleats, or other special sport shoes, don't make that big of a difference, do they?


QuestionWhen mom drives me a short distance to a friend's house or school, I don't always wear my seatbelt. Is it worth it for such a short car ride?

AnswerA car wreck can happen anywhere, whether you're right around the corner or 50 miles from home. In fact, a little more than half of all car crashes that take place each year are only 5 miles away from where they started. There is no way to predict when the circumstances for an accident will be right. But seatbelts are a sure bet. Eleven thousand lives are saved each year from people wearing their seatbelts. That's why it's better to get into the habit of wearing your seatbelt so that you are safe no matter what happens.


QuestionI take the shortcut through the park to get to my friend's house. I never see anyone back there, so it must be safe, right?

AnswerNot necessarily. It can seem way easier to go the back way, but you never know who could be there. And, if you're by yourself, it would be hard to get help if you needed it. It's much safer to go a way where you can see lots of people—even if it takes you a little longer. Look around and make sure there are plenty of lights. And, make sure you know where to get help if you need it.

P.S. While you are walking, riding your bike, or rollerblading, stay on the sidewalk and wear your safety gear. While you are on the way, if a stranger approaches you, be prepared to handle the situation.


QuestionI am on my way to play some soccer and my cleats are worn down. Plus, the grass is wet from last night's rain. Is it still OK to play? I mean, cleats, or other special sport shoes, don't make that big of a difference, do they?

AnswerBefore you play any sport, be sure your equipment, gear, and field are in top form. Even though it doesn't seem like a big deal, lots of kids are injured every year because their equipment is in bad condition. Safety padding, shoes, and helmets are a few examples of the equipment you should keep in tiptop shape. You also need to know the right equipment to use for the activity you are involved in. For more information, check out Gear Up.

 

 

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