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Spotlight Arthritis Expenditures

Total Medical Expenditures Among U.S. Adults with Arthritis Increased by 100 Billion Dollars

Picture of a stethoscope and money

A CDC study found that from 1997 to 2005, total expenditures among U.S. adults with arthritis increased by 22% from $252 billion in 1997 to $353 billion in 2005. Medical expenditures increased because the number of people with arthritis increased by 22% and medical expenditures for each person with arthritis increased by 15%.

Prescription drug costs accounted for the biggest portion of this increase. Costs for ambulatory care also increased while hospital care costs decreased.

Medical expenditures among people with arthritis are likely to continue rising as another recent CDC study projected that the number of people with arthritis would rise by 40% from 2005 to 2030.

In Summary

  • Medical expenditures rose by $100 billion between 1997 and 2005.
  • Medical expenditures increased because of a 22% increase in the number of people with arthritis and a 15% increase in average medical expenditures among people with arthritis.
  • Medical expenditures are likely to rise as an increase in the number of people with arthritis is projected to rise.

Further information on arthritis related costs statistics is available.

Reference

Cisternas MG, Murphy LB, Yelin EH, Foreman AJ, Pasta DJ, Helmick CG. Trends in medical care expenditures of U.S. adults with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions 1997 to 2005. J Rheumatol 2009;36(4):2531–8. abstract

 
 

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