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Racial/Ethnic Differences

Differences in the Prevalence and Impact of Arthritis Among Racial/Ethnic Groups in the United States

The following estimates are from our most recent, published analysis of racial/ethnic differences using three years (2002, 2003, and 2006) of data from the National Health Interview Survey. The National Health Interview Survey is a annual health survey of more 30,000 adults conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics. This study reports first-ever national estimates of arthritis prevalence for Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders (8%) and American Indians/Alaska Natives (25%) and documents disparities in work limitation, activity limitation, and severe pain.

Figure 1. – Prevalence of Arthritis by Race/Ethnicity

Non-Hispanic White
23.8%
Non-Hispanic Black
19.4%
Hispanic
11.1%
American Indian/Alaska Native
25.2%
Asian/Pacific Islander
8.4%
Multiracial/Other
20.7%

Source: National Health Interview Survey 2002, 2003, 2006

*The prevalence of among Hispanics in the 2002, 2003, 2006 and 2008 National Health Interview Survey is described later on this page


Among adults with doctor-diagnosed arthritis more than one-third (37.7%) had arthritis-attributable activity limitations, 31.2% had a work limitation (adults aged 18–64 years), and 25.6% had severe pain. Non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics had worse arthritis impact despite having the same or lower prevalence of arthritis compared to non-Hispanic whites.


Figure 2. – Activity Limitation Among Adults
with Arthritis by Race/Ethnicity


Non-Hispanic White
36.2%
Non-Hispanic Black
44.6%
Hispanic
43.2%
American Indian/Alaska Native
39.1%
Asian/Pacific Islander
38.2%
Multiracial/Other
49.5%

Source: National Health Interview Survey 2002, 2003, 2006

*The prevalence of among Hispanics in the 2002, 2003, 2006 and 2008 National Health Interview Survey is described later on this page

Figure 3. - Work Limitation Among Working Age Adults
with Arthritis by Race/Ethnicity


Non-Hispanic White
28.8%
Non-Hispanic Black
41.6%
Hispanic
39.7%
American Indian/Alaska Native
37.7%
Asian/Pacific Islander
28.2%
Multiracial/Other
46.4%

Source: National Health Interview Survey 2002, 2003, 2006

*The prevalence of among Hispanics in the 2002, 2003, 2006 and 2008 National Health Interview Survey is described later on this page

Figure 4. – Severe Pain Among Adults with
Arthritis by Race/Ethnicity


Non-Hispanic White
23.1%
Non-Hispanic Black
38.3%
Hispanic
36.4%
American Indian/Alaska Native
28.7%
Asian/Pacific Islander
18.5%
Multiracial/Other
36.6%

Source: National Health Interview Survey 2002, 2003, 2006

*The prevalence of among Hispanics in the 2002, 2003, 2006 and 2008 National Health Interview Survey is described later on this page


Physical activity and arthritis self-management education have been proven to reduce pain and improve function among adults with arthritis. Evidence-based programs, including Spanish language and other culturally tailored strategies, should be made more available and accessible to all people with arthritis, and especially racial/ethnic groups with higher rates of pain and activity limitation.

In summary, arthritis is a frequent problem with a large impact on all racial/ethnic groups, but the disabling effects of arthritis (arthritis-attributable activity limitations, work limitations, and severe pain) affect racial/ethnic minorities more frequently. Read more about improving arthritis pain with physical activity.

The burden of arthritis is high across Hispanic subgroups

CDC examined the prevalence of arthritis and its effects among US adults across seven Hispanic subgroups. An estimated 3.1 million Hispanics reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis.

Among Hispanic subgroups, the prevalence of doctor- diagnosed arthritis is highest among Puerto Ricans and lowest among Cuban/Cuban-Americans

Graphic chart: Hispanic subgroups- Puerto Rican=22, Other or Multiple Hispanic/Latin=19, Mexican American=18, Mexican=14, Dominican=16, Central/South American=13, Cuban/Cuban American=12

Age-adjusted prevalence of arthritis across Hispanic subgroups

Source: National Health Interview Survey 2002, 2003, 2006 and 2008


Across all Hispanic subgroups, at least 1 in 5 report an arthritis-attributable effect.

Graphic chart: In the Hispanic subgroups, the percentage of arthritis-attributable activity, work limitations and severe joint pain are as follows (respectively); Puerto Rican=50, 40, 45. Other/Multiple HIspanic subgroups=45, 35, 25. Mexican America=45, 43, 28. Mexican=45, 38, 40. Dominican/Dominican American=35, 38, 40. Central/South American=38, 40, 32. Cuban/Cuban American = 20, 40, 28.

* Subgroups are presented in decreasing order of arthritis-attributable activity limitation .

From: Murphy LB, Bolen J, Schieb L, Hootman, JM, Langmaid GA, Cheng YJ, et al. Prevalence of Doctor-Diagnosed Arthritis and Arthritis-Attributable Effects Among Hispanic Adults, by Hispanic Subgroup — United States, 2002, 2003, 2006, and 2009. MMWR 2011;60(6):167-171. html pdf [1.1MB]

Figure 5. – Among Hispanics with arthritis, arthritis attributable activity limitations are
most prevalent among Puerto Ricans and least prevalent among Cuban/Cuban-Americans


Mexican
42%
Mexican American
44%
Central/South American
32%
Puerto Rican
49%
Other/Multiple Hispanic subgroups
44%
Cuban/Cuban American
21%
Dominican/Dominican American
22%

Age-adjusted prevalence of arthritis-attributable activity limitations across Hispanic subgroups

Source: National Health Interview Survey 2002, 2003, 2006 and 2008


Figure 6. – Among Hispanics with arthritis, arthritis attributable work limitations are most
prevalent among Mexican Americans and least prevalent among Central/South Americans


Mexican
39%
Mexican American
42%
Central/South American
33%
Puerto Rican
39%
Other/Multiple Hispanic subgroups
35%
Cuban/Cuban American
39%
Dominican/Dominican American
37%

Age-adjusted prevalence of arthritis-attributable activity limitations across Hispanic subgroups

Source: National Health Interview Survey 2002, 2003, 2006 and 2008

Reference

Bolen J, Schieb L, Hootman JM, Helmick CG, Theis K, Murphy LB, et al. Differences in the prevalence and impact of arthritis among racial/ethnic groups in the United States, National Health Interview Survey, 2002, 2003, and 2006. Prev Chronic Dis 2010;7(3):1–5. html pdf [320k]

 
 

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