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Section 4: ART Cycles Using Donor Eggs

Are older women undergoing ART more likely to use donor eggs or embryos?

As shown in Figures 16 and 35, eggs produced by women in older age groups form embryos that are less likely to implant and more likely to result in miscarriage if they do implant. As a result, ART using donor eggs is much more common among older women than among younger women. Donor eggs or embryos were used in approximately 12% of all ART cycles performed in 2011 (18,530 cycles). Figure 38 shows the percentage of ART cycles using donor eggs in 2011 according to the woman’s age. Few women younger than age 40 used donor eggs; however, the percentage of cycles performed with donor eggs increased sharply after age 40. Among women older than age 48, for example, 88% of all ART cycles used donor eggs.

Figure 38: Percentages of ART Cycles Using Donor Eggs, by Age of Woman, 2011.

Download Slide 38 [PDF - 238KB]

Do percentages of transfers that result in live births differ by age between women using ART with fresh donor eggs and those using ART with their own eggs?

Figure 39 compares percentages of transfers that resulted in live births for ART cycles performed in 2011 using fresh embryos from donor eggs with those for ART cycles using a woman’s own eggs, among women of different ages. The likelihood of a fertilized egg implanting is related to the age of the woman who produced the egg. Thus, the percentage of transfers resulting in live births for cycles using fresh embryos from women’s own eggs declines as women get older. In contrast, since egg donors are typically in their 20s or early 30s, the percentage of transfers that resulted in live births for cycles using embryos from donor eggs remained consistently above 50% among women of most ages.

Figure 39: Percentages of Transfers That Resulted in Live Births for ART Cycles Using Fresh Embryos from Own Eggs and ART Cycles Using Fresh Embryos from Donor Eggs, by Age of Woman, 2011.

Download Slide 39 [PDF - 238KB]

How successful is ART when donor eggs are used?

Figure 40 shows percentages of transfers that resulted in live births and singleton live births for ART cycles performed in 2011 using fresh embryos from donor eggs among women of different ages. For all ages, an average of 55% of transfers resulted in live births while 35% of transfers resulted in singleton live births. Singleton live births are an important measure of success because of a much lower risk than multiple-infant births for adverse infant health outcomes, including prematurity, low birth weight, disability, and death.

Figure 40: Percentages of Transfers That Resulted in Live Births and Singleton Live Births for ART Cycles Using Fresh Embryos from Donor Eggs, by Age of Woman, 2011.

Download Slide 40 [PDF - 241KB]

What is the risk of having a multiple-fetus pregnancy or multiple-infant live birth from an ART cycle using fresh donor eggs?

Multiple-infant births are associated with greater problems for both mothers and infants, including higher rates of caesarean section, prematurity, low birth weight, and infant disability or death.

Part A of Figure 41 shows that among the 6,323 pregnancies that resulted from ART cycles using fresh embryos from donor eggs, approximately 56% were singleton pregnancies, 36% were twins, and 2% were triplets or more. About 6% of pregnancies ended before the number of fetuses could be accurately determined. Therefore, the percentage of pregnancies with more than one fetus might have been higher than what was reported (approximately 38%).

Part B of Figure 41 shows 5,353 live births in 2011 resulted from ART cycles that used fresh embryos from donor eggs. Approximately 36% of these live births produced more than one infant. This compares with a multiple-infant birth rate of slightly more than 3% in the general U.S. population.

Although total percentages for multiples were similar for pregnancies and live births, there were more triplet or higher order pregnancies than births. Triplet or higher order pregnancies may be reduced to twins or singletons by the time of birth. This can happen naturally (e.g., fetal death), or a woman and her doctor may decide to reduce the number of fetuses using a procedure called multifetal pregnancy reduction. CDC does not collect information on multifetal pregnancy reductions.

Figure 41: Distribution of Multiple-Fetus Pregnancies and Multiple-Infant Live Births Among ART Cycles Using Fresh Embryos from Donor Eggs, 2011.

Download Slide 41 [PDF - 263KB]

How do percentages of transfers that result in pregnancies, live births, and singleton live births differ between ART cycles using frozen donor embryos and those using fresh donor embryos?

Figure 42 shows that percentages of transfers that resulted in pregnancies, live births, and singleton live births for ART cycles using frozen donor embryos in 2011 were substantially lower than for ART cycles using fresh donor embryos. The average number of embryos transferred was the same (1.9) for cycles using frozen donor embryos and those using fresh donor embryos.

Figure 42: Percentages of Transfers That Resulted in Pregnancies, Live Births, and Singleton Live Births for ART Cycles Using Frozen Donor Embryos, Compared with ART Cycles Using Fresh Donor Embryos, 2011.

Download Slide 42 [PDF - 238KB]

 

ART 2011 National Summary Presentation.
[PDF - 860KB]

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