Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options
CDC Home

Section 5: ART Trends 2002–2011

Click on titles or images to go back to Section 5.


Figure 43 is a line graph with three lines representing the numbers of ART cycles performed, live-birth deliveries, and infants born using ART, by year from 2002 to 2011

  • 2002: 115,392 ART cycles, 33,141 live-births, 45,751 infants born
  • 2003: 122,872 ART cycles, 35,785 live-births, 48,756 infants born
  • 2004: 127,977 ART cycles, 36,760 live-births, 49,458 infants born
  • 2005: 134,260 ART cycles, 38,910 live-births, 52,041 infants born
  • 2006: 138,198 ART cycles, 41,343 live-births, 54,656 infants born
  • 2007: 142,435 ART cycles, 43,412 live-births, 57,569 infants born
  • 2008: 148,055 ART cycles, 46,326 live-births, 61,426 infants born
  • 2009: 146,244 ART cycles, 45,870 live-births, 60,190 infants born
  • 2010: 147,260 ART cycles, 47,090 live-births, 61,564 infants born
  • 2011: 151,923 ART cycles, 47,818 live-births, 61,610 infants born

Figure 44 is a line graph with one line representing the numbers of ART cycles performed for banking all fresh nondonor eggs or embryos, by year from 2002 to 2011.

  • 2002: 514 ART banking cycles
  • 2003: 504 ART banking cycles
  • 2004: 744 ART banking cycles
  • 2005: 875 ART banking cycles
  • 2006: 1,247 ART banking cycles
  • 2007: 2,020 ART banking cycles
  • 2008: 3,773 ART banking cycles
  • 2009: 5,039 ART banking cycles
  • 2010: 7,163 ART banking cycles
  • 2011: 11,116 ART banking cycle

Figure 45 is a line graph with four lines representing the numbers of ICSI procedures performed, by type of ART cycle, by year from 2002 to 2011.

  • 2002:  Fresh nondonor with ICSI 45,611 cycles, Frozen nondonor 16,383 cycles, Fresh donor with ICSI 4,919 cycles, Frozen donor 3,922 cycles
  • 2003:  Fresh nondonor with ICSI 50,872 cycles, Frozen nondonor 17,517 cycles, Fresh donor with ICSI 5,565 cycles, Frozen donor 4,464 cycles
  • 2004:  Fresh nondonor with ICSI 54,276 cycles, Frozen nondonor 18,560 cycles, Fresh donor with ICSI 5,947 cycles, Frozen donor 4,919 cycles
  • 2005:  Fresh nondonor with ICSI 58,193 cycles, Frozen nondonor 20,657 cycles, Fresh donor with ICSI 6,376 cycles, Frozen donor 5,541 cycles
  • 2006:  Fresh nondonor with ICSI 61,835 cycles, Frozen nondonor 22,023 cycles, Fresh donor with ICSI 7,039 cycles, Frozen donor 5,992 cycles
  • 2007:  Fresh nondonor with ICSI 64,629 cycles, Frozen nondonor 23,133 cycles, Fresh donor with ICSI 7,500 cycles, Frozen donor 6,130 cycles
  • 2008:  Fresh nondonor with ICSI 67,328 cycles, Frozen nondonor 25,261 cycles, Fresh donor with ICSI 8,088 cycles, Frozen donor 6,344 cycles
  • 2009:  Fresh nondonor with ICSI 66,490 cycles, Frozen nondonor 26,069 cycles, Fresh donor with ICSI 7,871 cycles, Frozen donor 6,659 cycles
  • 2010:  Fresh nondonor with ICSI 66,859 cycles, Frozen nondonor 28,425 cycles, Fresh donor with ICSI 7,882 cycles, Frozen donor 7,162 cycles
  • 2011:  Fresh nondonor with ICSI 67,603 cycles, Frozen nondonor 32,180 cycles, Fresh donor with ICSI 8,013 cycles, Frozen donor 7,733 cycles

Figure 46 is a line graph with six lines representing percentages of transfers that resulted in live births, by type of ART cycle and ICSI, by year from 2002 to 2011.

  • 2002: Fresh nondonor without ICSI 36.5%, Fresh nondonor with ICSI 33.8%, Frozen nondonor 24.8%, Fresh donor without ICSI 52.9%, Fresh donor with ICSI 47.8%, Frozen donor 28.8%
  • 2003: Fresh nondonor without ICSI 36.2%, Fresh nondonor with ICSI 33.9%, Frozen nondonor 27.0%, Fresh donor without ICSI 52.1%, Fresh donor with ICSI 49.9%, Frozen donor 30.1%
  • 2004: Fresh nondonor without ICSI 35.9%, Fresh nondonor with ICSI 33.1%, Frozen nondonor 27.7%, Fresh donor without ICSI 53.3%, Fresh donor with ICSI 48.8%, Frozen donor 30.5%
  • 2005: Fresh nondonor without ICSI 36.1%, Fresh nondonor with ICSI 33.5%, Frozen nondonor 28.0%, Fresh donor without ICSI 54.5%, Fresh donor with ICSI 51.0%, Frozen donor 30.9%
  • 2006: Fresh nondonor without ICSI 37.2%, Fresh nondonor with ICSI 34.6%, Frozen nondonor 28.9%, Fresh donor without ICSI 55.6%, Fresh donor with ICSI 52.8%, Frozen donor 32.1%
  • 2007: Fresh nondonor without ICSI 37.2%, Fresh nondonor with ICSI 35.4%, Frozen nondonor 29.9%, Fresh donor without ICSI 56.3%, Fresh donor with ICSI 54.7%, Frozen donor 31.9%
  • 2008: Fresh nondonor without ICSI 38.0%, Fresh nondonor with ICSI 36.2%, Frozen nondonor 30.6%, Fresh donor without ICSI 57.7%, Fresh donor with ICSI 54.0%, Frozen donor 33.2%
  • 2009: Fresh nondonor without ICSI 37.5%, Fresh nondonor with ICSI 36.3%, Frozen nondonor 30.8%, Fresh donor without ICSI 56.1%, Fresh donor with ICSI 54.8%, Frozen donor 34.0%
  • 2010: Fresh nondonor without ICSI 38.0%, Fresh nondonor with ICSI 36.4%, Frozen nondonor 33.7%, Fresh donor without ICSI 57.3%, Fresh donor with ICSI 55.3%, Frozen donor 34.9%
  • 2011: Fresh nondonor without ICSI 36.0%, Fresh nondonor with ICSI 35.8%, Frozen nondonor 34.5%, Fresh donor without ICSI 55.6%, Fresh donor with ICSI 54.6%, Frozen donor 35.7%

Figure 47 is a line graph with five lines through 2006 and six lines starting with 2007 representing percentages of transfers that resulted in live births for ART cycles using fresh nondonor eggs or embryos, by age group, by year from 2002 to 2011.

  • 2002:  Age <35, 43.0%; Age 35–37, 37.1%; Age 38–40, 26.4%; Age 41–42, 14.7%; Age >42, 6.6%
  • 2003:  Age <35, 43.2%; Age 35–37, 36.6%; Age 38–40, 26.1%; Age 41–42, 15.1%; Age >42, 5.9%
  • 2004:  Age <35, 42.7%; Age 35–37, 35.5%; Age 38–40, 25.3%; Age 41–42, 14.8%; Age >42, 6.1%
  • 2005:  Age <35, 43.4%; Age 35–37, 35.9%; Age 38–40, 25.4%; Age 41–42, 14.9%; Age >42, 5.8%
  • 2006:  Age <35, 44.7%; Age 35–37, 37.1%; Age 38–40, 26.7%; Age 41–42, 15.1%; Age >42, 6.6%, Note: 2006 was the last year in which data were reported together for women older than 42.
  • 2007:  Age <35, 45.9%; Age 35–37, 36.9%; Age 38–40, 27.1%; Age 41–42, 16.0%; Age 43–44, 8.4%; Age >44, 3.2%, Note: 2007 was the first year in which data for women older than 42 were subdivided into ages 43–44 and >44.
  • 2008:  Age <35, 47.1%; Age 35–37, 37.4%; Age 38–40, 28.2%; Age 41–42, 16.5%; Age 43–44, 7.8%; Age >44, 2.8%
  • 2009:  Age <35, 47.2%; Age 35–37, 38.1%; Age 38–40, 28.2%; Age 41–42, 16.7%; Age 43–44, 7.2%; Age >44, 2.5%
  • 2010:  Age <35, 47.6%; Age 35–37, 38.3%; Age 38–40, 28.1%; Age 41–42, 16.7%; Age 43–44, 7.4%; Age >44, 1.8%
  • 2011:  Age <35, 46.0%; Age 35–37, 38.4%; Age 38–40, 27.3%; Age 41–42, 16.5%; Age 43–44, 7.6%; Age >44, 2.1%

Figure 48 is a line graph with five lines through 2006 and six lines starting with 2007 representing percentages of transfers that resulted in singleton live births for ART cycles using fresh nondonor eggs or embryos, by age group, by year from 2002 to 2011. 

  • 2002:  Age <35, 26.3%; Age 35–37, 24.0%; Age 38–40, 19.3%; Age 41–42, 11.9%; Age >42, 6.2%
  • 2003:  Age <35, 26.6%; Age 35–37, 24.8%; Age 38–40, 19.3%; Age 41–42, 12.4%; Age >42, 5.3%
  • 2004:  Age <35, 27.3%; Age 35–37, 24.3%; Age 38–40, 19.0%; Age 41–42, 12.3%; Age >42, 5.6%
  • 2005:  Age <35, 27.9%; Age 35–37, 24.9%; Age 38–40, 19.0%; Age 41–42, 12.7%; Age >42, 5.1%
  • 2006:  Age <35, 29.3%; Age 35–37, 26.0%; Age 38–40, 20.7%; Age 41–42, 12.7%; Age >42, 6.0%, Note: 2006 was the last year in which data were reported together for women older than 42.
  • 2007:  Age <35, 29.9%; Age 35–37, 25.7%; Age 38–40, 20.6%; Age 41–42, 13.6%; Age 43–44, 7.7%; Age >44, 2.8%, Note: 2007 was the first year in which data for women older than 42 were subdivided into ages 43–44 and >44.
  • 2008:  Age <35, 30.4%; Age 35–37, 26.2%; Age 38–40, 21.1%; Age 41–42, 13.9%; Age 43–44, 6.9%; Age >44, 2.1%
  • 2009:  Age <35, 30.9%; Age 35–37, 27.0%; Age 38–40, 21.8%; Age 41–42, 14.0%; Age 43–44, 6.6%; Age >44, 2.0%
  • 2010:  Age <35, 31.4%; Age 35–37, 27.3%; Age 38–40, 21.5%; Age 41–42, 13.7%; Age 43–44, 6.6%; Age >44, 1.6%
  • 2011:  Age <35, 31.3%; Age 35–37, 27.6%; Age 38–40, 21.2%; Age 41–42, 13.9%; Age 43–44, 6.8%; Age >44, 2.0%

Figure 49 is a bar graph representing percentages of fresh nondonor cycles that involved the transfer of one, two, three, or four or more embryos, by year from 2002 to 2011.  

  • 2002:  One, 7%; Two, 32%; Three, 34%; Four or more, 28% Note: Total does not equal 100% due to rounding.
  • 2003:  One, 7%; Two, 36%; Three, 33%; Four or more, 24%
  • 2004:  One, 8%; Two, 39%; Three, 32%; Four or more, 21%
  • 2005:  One, 9%; Two, 43%; Three, 29%; Four or more, 18% Note: Total does not equal 100% due to rounding.
  • 2006:  One, 11%; Two, 46%; Three, 28%; Four or more, 16% Note: Total does not equal 100% due to rounding.
  • 2007:  One, 12%; Two, 48%; Three, 26%; Four or more, 14%
  • 2008:  One, 12%; Two, 50%; Three, 25%; Four or more, 14% Note: Total does not equal 100% due to rounding.
  • 2009:  One, 14%; Two, 52%; Three, 23%; Four or more, 12% Note: Total does not equal 100% due to rounding.
  • 2010:  One, 15%; Two, 53%; Three, 21%; Four or more, 10% Note: Total does not equal 100% due to rounding.
  • 2011:  One, 17%; Two, 54%; Three, 20%; Four or more, 9%

Figure 50 is a bar graph representing percentages of fresh nondonor cycles that involved the transfer of one, two, three, or four or more embryos among women who were younger than age 35 and set aside extra embryos for future use, by year from 2002 to 2011. 

  • 2002:  One, 1%; Two, 55%; Three, 35%; Four or more, 9%
  • 2003:  One, 2%; Two, 62%; Three, 29%; Four or more, 7%
  • 2004:  One, 3%; Two, 68%; Three, 25%; Four or more, 5% Note: Total does not equal 100% due to rounding.
  • 2005:  One, 4%; Two, 72%; Three, 20%; Four or more, 4%
  • 2006:  One, 7%; Two, 75%; Three, 16%; Four or more, 3% Note: Total does not equal 100% due to rounding.
  • 2007:  One, 9%; Two, 76%; Three, 13%; Four or more, 2%
  • 2008: One, 10%; Two, 77%; Three, 11%; Four or more, 2%
  • 2009:  One, 14%; Two, 77%; Three, 8%; Four or more, 1%
  • 2010:  One, 19%; Two, 75%; Three, 6%; Four or more, 1% Note: Total does not equal 100% due to rounding.
  • 2011:  One, 22%; Two, 73%; Three, 5%; Four or more, <1% Note: Total does not equal 100% due to rounding.

Figure 51 is a line graph with four lines representing percentages of elective single embryo transfer (eSET) among all transfers using fresh nondonor eggs or embryos, by age group, by year from 2002 to 2011.  Note: All ages >40 years are reported together due to the small number of transfers performed with eSET.

  • 2002:  Age <35, 0.6%; Age 35–37, 0.4%; Age 38–40, 0.2%; Age >40, <0.1%
  • 2003:  Age <35, 0.8%; Age 35–37, 0.4%; Age 38–40, 0.2%; Age >40, 0.1%
  • 2004:  Age <35, 1.2%; Age 35–37, 0.7%; Age 38–40, 0.3%; Age >40, 0.1%
  • 2005:  Age <35, 2.1%; Age 35–37, 1.4%; Age 38–40, 0.5%; Age >40, 0.2%
  • 2006:  Age <35, 3.3%; Age 35–37, 2.0%; Age 38–40, 0.8%; Age >40, 0.3%
  • 2007:  Age <35, 4.6%; Age 35–37, 2.7%; Age 38–40, 1.1%; Age >40, 0.3%
  • 2008:  Age <35, 5.2%; Age 35–37, 3.3%; Age 38–40, 1.1%; Age >40, 0.6%
  • 2009:  Age <35, 7.4%; Age 35–37, 4.2%; Age 38–40, 1.3%; Age >40, 0.5%
  • 2010:  Age <35, 10.0%; Age 35–37, 5.6%; Age 38–40, 1.9%; Age >40, 0.6%
  • 2011:  Age <35, 12.2%; Age 35–37, 7.0%; Age 38–40, 2.2%; Age >40, 0.7%

Figure 52 is a line graph with four lines representing percentages of transfers that resulted in live births using fresh nondonor eggs or embryos, by number of embryos transferred, by year from 2002 to 2011.

  • 2002:  One, 12.8%; Two, 39.5%; Three, 37.7%; Four or more, 31.4%
  • 2003:  One, 13.2%; Two, 40.2%; Three, 36.9%; Four or more, 30.1%
  • 2004:  One, 13.7%; Two, 40.0%; Three, 35.4%; Four or more, 28.8%
  • 2005:  One, 16.7%; Two, 40.9%; Three, 34.3%; Four or more, 27.6%
  • 2006:  One, 18.8%; Two, 41.9%; Three, 35.1%; Four or more, 27.9%
  • 2007:  One, 20.8%; Two, 42.6%; Three, 34.8%; Four or more, 27.8%
  • 2008:  One, 22.0%; Two, 43.7%; Three, 34.7%; Four or more, 27.2%
  • 2009:  One, 24.5%; Two, 44.0%; Three, 33.2%; Four or more, 25.1%
  • 2010:  One, 27.9%; Two, 43.9%; Three, 31.7%; Four or more, 24.9%
  • 2011:  One, 28.5%; Two, 42.3%; Three, 30.6%; Four or more, 23.0%

Figure 53 is a line graph with four lines representing percentages of transfers that resulted in multiple-infant live births using fresh nondonor eggs or embryos, by number of embryos transferred, by year from 2002 to 2011.

  • 2002:  One, 0.3%; Two, 13.2%; Three, 14.4%; Four or more, 11.8%
  • 2003:  One, 0.3%; Two, 13.2%; Three, 13.7%; Four or more, 10.9%
  • 2004:  One, 0.3%; Two, 13.1%; Three, 12.3%; Four or more, 9.7%
  • 2005:  One, 0.3%; Two, 13.6%; Three, 11.8%; Four or more, 9.0%
  • 2006:  One, 0.3%; Two, 13.6%; Three, 11.8%; Four or more, 8.4%
  • 2007:  One, 0.5%; Two, 14.5%; Three, 11.6%; Four or more, 8.2%
  • 2008:  One, 0.4%; Two, 15.1%; Three, 11.5%; Four or more, 8.8%
  • 2009:  One, 0.5%; Two, 15.3%; Three, 10.5%; Four or more, 6.8%
  • 2010:  One, 0.5%; Two, 15.4%; Three, 10.4%; Four or more, 6.9%
  • 2011:  One, 0.5%; Two, 14.5%; Three, 9.3%; Four or more, 5.4%

Figure 54 is a line graph with five lines through 2006 and six lines starting with 2007 representing percentages of ART cycles that resulted in multiple-infant live births using fresh nondonor eggs or embryos, by age group, by year from 2002 to 2011.

  • 2002:  Age <35, 38.9%; Age 35–37, 35.4%; Age 38–40, 26.9%; Age 41–42, 18.6%; Age >42, 6.5%
  • 2003:  Age <35, 38.4%; Age 35–37, 32.1%; Age 38–40, 26.1%; Age 41–42, 17.4%; Age >42, 10.2%
  • 2004:  Age <35, 36.1%; Age 35–37, 31.5%; Age 38–40, 24.9%; Age 41–42, 16.8%; Age >42, 8.2%
  • 2005:  Age <35, 35.6%; Age 35–37, 30.9%; Age 38–40, 25.1%; Age 41–42, 14.5%; Age >42, 12.8%
  • 2006:  Age <35, 34.4%; Age 35–37, 29.8%; Age 38–40, 22.6%; Age 41–42, 15.4%; Age >42, 9.4%. Note: 2006 was the last year in which data were reported together for women older than 42.
  • 2007:  Age <35, 34.9%; Age 35–37, 30.4%; Age 38–40, 23.9%; Age 41–42, 15.4%; Age 43–44, 8.9%; Age >44, 13.0%. Note: 2007 was the first year in which data for women older than 42 were subdivided into ages 43–44 and >44.
  • 2008:  Age <35, 35.4%; Age 35–37, 30.0%; Age 38–40, 25.2%; Age 41–42, 15.9%; Age 43–44, 11.3%; Age >44, 23.8%
  • 2009:  Age <35, 34.6%; Age 35–37, 29.0%; Age 38–40, 22.9%; Age 41–42, 16.2%; Age 43–44, 8.4%; Age >44, 19.0%
  • 2010:  Age <35, 34.0%; Age 35–37, 28.7%; Age 38–40, 23.3%; Age 41–42, 18.0%; Age 43–44, 10.2%; Age >44, 14.3%
  • 2011:  Age <35, 32.0%; Age 35–37, 28.2%; Age 38–40, 22.3%; Age 41–42, 15.8%; Age 43–44, 10.4%; Age >44, 5.6%

Figure 55 is a bar graph representing percentages of transfers that resulted in live births and percentages of multiple-infant live births for ART cycles using fresh nondonor eggs or embryos, by year from 2002 to 2011.   

  • 2002:  Percentage of live births, 34.8%. Of these live births, 65% were singletons, 32% were twins, and 4% were triplets or more. Note: Total does not equal 100% due to rounding.
  • 2003:  Percentage of live births, 34.7%. Of these live births, 66% were singletons, 31% were twins, and 3% were triplets or more.
  • 2004:  Percentage of live births, 34.1%. Of these live births, 67% were singletons, 30% were twins, and 3% were triplets or more.
  • 2005:  Percentage of live births, 34.3%. Of these live births, 68% were singletons, 30% were twins, and 2% were triplets or more.
  • 2006:  Percentage of live births, 35.4%. Of these live births, 69% were singletons, 29% were twins, and 2% were triplets or more.
  • 2007:  Percentage of live births, 35.9%. Of these live births, 69% were singletons, 29% were twins, and 2% were triplets or more.
  • 2008:  Percentage of live births, 36.7%. Of these live births, 68% were singletons, 30% were twins, and 2% were triplets or more.
  • 2009:  Percentage of live births, 36.6%. Of these live births, 69% were singletons, 29% were twins, and 2% were triplets or more.
  • 2010:  Percentage of live births, 36.8%. Of these live births, 70% were singletons, 29% were twins, and 1% were triplets or more.
  • 2011:  Percentage of live births, 35.8%. Of these live births, 71% were singletons, 27% were twins, and 1% were triplets or more. Note: Total does not equal 100% due to rounding.
 

ART 2011 National Summary Presentation.
[PDF - 860KB]

Contact Us:
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    1600 Clifton Rd
    Atlanta, GA 30333
  • 800-CDC-INFO
    (800-232-4636)
    TTY: (888) 232-6348
  • Contact CDC-INFO
USA.gov: The U.S. Government's Official Web PortalDepartment of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention   1600 Clifton Rd. Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) TTY: (888) 232-6348 - Contact CDC–INFO
A-Z Index
  1. A
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. E
  6. F
  7. G
  8. H
  9. I
  10. J
  11. K
  12. L
  13. M
  14. N
  15. O
  16. P
  17. Q
  18. R
  19. S
  20. T
  21. U
  22. V
  23. W
  24. X
  25. Y
  26. Z
  27. #