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Section 1: Overview

Where are United States ART clinics located, how many ART cycles did they perform in 2010, and how many infants were born from these ART cycles?

Although ART clinics are located throughout the United States, generally in or near major cities, the greatest number of clinics is in the eastern United States. Figure 1 shows the locations of the 443 reporting clinics. Individual clinic tables with success rates and clinic profiles are published in the 2010 Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report, arranged in alphabetical order by state, city, and clinic name. The number of clinics, cycles performed, live-birth deliveries, and infants born as a result of ART all have increased steadily since CDC began collecting this information in 1995 (see Section 5). Because in some cases more than one infant is born during a live-birth delivery (e.g., twins), the total number of infants born is greater than the number of live-birth deliveries. CDC estimates that ART accounts for slightly more than 1% of total U.S. births..

Figure 1: Locations of ART Clinics in the United States and Puerto Rico, 2010.
Number of ART clinics in the United States in 2010 474
Number of ART clinics that submitted data in 2010 443
Number of ART cycles reported in 2010 147,260*
Number of live-birth deliveries resulting from ART cycles started in 2010 47,090
Number of infants born as a result of ART cycles performed in 2010 61,564
* Note: This number does not include 4 cycles in which a new treatment procedure was being evaluated (see Figure 2).

What types of ART cycles were performed in the United States in 2010?

Figure 2 shows the types of ART cycles performed in the United States in 2010. For approximately 69% of ART cycles performed in 2010, fresh nondonor eggs or embryos were used. ART cycles that used frozen nondonor embryos were the next most common type, accounting for approximately 19% of the total. In about 12% of cycles, eggs or embryos were donated by another woman or couple. A very small number of cycles (less than 0.1%) involved the evaluation of a new treatment procedure. Cycles in which a new treatment procedure was being evaluated are not included in the total number of cycles reported in this report or the 2010 Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report. Thus, data in this report presented in subsequent figures and in the National Summary table are based on 147,260 ART cycles.

Figure 2: Types of ART Cycles—United States, 2010.

How old were women who used ART in the United States in 2010?

Figure 3 presents ART cycles performed in the United States in 2010 according to the age of the woman who had the procedure. The average age of women using ART services in 2010 was 36. The largest group of women using ART services were women younger than age 35, representing approximately 39% of all ART cycles performed in 2010. Approximately 20% of ART cycles were performed among women aged 35–37, 20% among women aged 38–40, 10% among women aged 41–42, 6% among women aged 43–44, and 5% among women older than age 44.

Figure 3: ART Use by Age Group—United States, 2010.

How did the types of ART cycles performed in the United States in 2010 differ among women of different ages?

Figure 4 shows that, in 2010, the type of ART cycles varied by the woman’s age. The vast majority (97%) of women younger than age 35 used their own eggs, whereas about 3% used donor eggs. In contrast, 37% of women aged 43–44 and 73% of women older than age 44 used donor eggs. Across all age groups, more ART cycles using fresh eggs or embryos were performed than cycles using frozen embryos.

Figure 4: Types of ART Cycles by Age Group—United States, 2010.

How is clinic size related to percentages of ART cycles performed in the United States in 2010 that resulted in live births?

The number of ART procedures performed every year varies among fertility clinics in the United States. For Figure 5, clinics were divided equally into four groups (called quartiles) based on the number of ART cycles it performed in 2010. The percentage for each quartile by type of ART represents the average percentage of ART cycles that resulted in live births for clinics in that quartile.

In 2010, percentages of ART cycles that resulted in live births using fresh nondonor eggs or embryos were similar regardless of the number of cycles performed in a clinic. However, for fresh donor cycles, the percentage of cycles that resulted in live births generally increased as the clinic size increased. Among frozen nondonor and frozen donor cycles, the percentage of cycles that resulted in live births varied by clinic size.

Figure 5: Percentages of ART Cycles That Resulted in Live Births, by Type of ART and Clinic Size—United States, 2010.
Figure 5: Percentages of ART Cycles That Resulted in Live Births, by Type of ART and Clinic Size—United States, 2010.
 

ART 2010 National Summary Presentation.
[PDF - 1.75MB]

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