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Importing Animals (including Pets) and Animal Products

A group of small green turtles. Photo courtesy Istock.

A group of small green turtles.

What is required to bring an animal into the U.S. when you travel or import a pet?

What is required to bring an animal product into the U.S.?

Dog confinement agreements: learn more about them and download forms.

Final Rule on Regulations for the Importation of Nonhuman Primates

On February 15, 2013, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) posted a final rule that revises HHS/CDC Regulation 42 Code of Federal Regulations Part 71.53, the regulations for importation of nonhuman primates (NHPs) into the United States. The final rule clarifies the process for importing NHPs and explains all requirements importers must follow to prevent the spread of disease from NHPs to humans. The final rule is effective beginning April 16, 2013.

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Internet Adoption Scams Involving Imported Pets

dog

The CDC has learned that Internet scammers are falsely representing themselves as CDC employees in e-mails to U.S. citizens.

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Regulations to Establish a User Fee for Filovirus Testing of Nonhuman Primates

On February 12, 2013, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published a final rule establishing a user fee for filovirus testing of nonhuman primates (NHPs). According to the final rule, CDC will charge a $540 user fee to cover the costs for testing of NHP samples submitted to the CDC. Filovirus antigen-capture testing is required for all Old World NHPs that die for any reason other than trauma during the mandatory 31-day quarantine period or that have illness consistent with filovirus infection. This rule became effective on March 14, 2013.

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About Animal Importation

Each day millions of animals and animal products are brought into the United States, increasing the potential for the introduction of infectious diseases. CDC works with other federal agencies to protect US borders against diseases carried by animals and animal products.

CDC’s current regulations govern the importation of pet dogs and cats, African rodents, turtles, monkeys, and civets, as well any product made from parts of these animals. Other animals or animal products may also be prohibited if they are known to be a risk to human health.

 
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